Jump to content

PM’s poem sparks literary showdown between two National Artists


webfact

Recommended Posts

PM’s poem sparks literary showdown between two National Artists
By WASAMON AUDJARINT
THE NATION

 

429828ff68f09ef6d89f5960a7c16e4a.jpeg

 

BANGKOK: -- AS GOOD as his stated intentions are to increase social harmony, Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha has again sparked a political fire – this time between two National Artists.

 

Naowarat Pongpaiboon and Suchart Sawasdsri, National Artists in Literature of 1993 and 2011 respectively, are known to have differing political opinions, and yet they are friends. While Naowarat rallied with the yellow shirts and blew his whistle on the streets protesting against the Pheu Thai government, Suchart has kept criticising the coup and pushed against the draconian lese majeste law.

 

The two artists are now engaged in a tussle over a nine-stanza Klon poem written by Prayut about his much-promoted concept of Thailand 4.0. After Naowarat added a few lines of his own to the PM’s poem, Suchart responded on Facebook.

 

Despite its name, the PM’s poem touches little on tech-savvy details while telling Thais to “not stand against the law”, which in practice includes orders enacted under the interim charter’s Article 44, which gives Prayut absolute power. Although imperfect in rhyme, the poem was hailed by the Education Ministry, which made a series of accompanying infographics. Officials even sung a ballad version of it – although the voice recording was later removed from the ministry’s Facebook page.

 

Naowarat, who was appointed by the junta to the defunct National Reform Council in 2014, wrote a stanza adding to the PM’s poem, suggesting that Thailand should also “adopt meritocracy”, promote traditional arts and culture, develop the educational system and balance power structures.

 

The verses were read out loud by Prayut himself during his weekly TV programme show last Friday. The premier also replied to Naowarat with more poetry, emphasising morality, good governance and a corruption-free society – all of which are the stated aims of the junta government.

 

Naowarat’s stanza, however, was scolded by Suchart the next day.

 

“What you have never seen you will see, what you have never known you will know,” wrote Suchart on Facebook, without mentioning Naowarat’s name, but referring to him by saying “My son asked me to let ‘him’ go, a ‘shadow’ [of the power-that-be]. I would let ‘him’ go. ‘He’ has his way and I have mine. We’d better not see each other again …

 

“Farewell to the melodious poems,” wrote Suchart.

 

“Is this one of those 250 handpicked senators in cultural affairs?” Suchart added in reference to the next Upper House, which will be wholly selected by the ruling junta, a “shadow” of the power-that-be that apparently will be ready to fawn on them.

 

Just five and a half hours later, Naowarat countered with a Karb Yani, a poem containing 11 syllables in each verse.

 

Possibly to counter criticism against the junta premier, Naowarat argued that whatever is good or bad could provide people with lessons as long as people know how to “live and see things properly”.

 

“We can prostrate to them as long as we can keep up with them,” he wrote in the poem. Apparently in response to Suchart, Naowarat went on: “When seeing a barking dog, don’t bark back. It simply tests our instincts, justifying who is genuinely good or bad.”

 

As the poetic battle went on, Prayut himself did not seem very satisfied with the outcome of his literary attempt.

 

“Just a little bit of my poem stirred another clash. I simply wrote what I had in mind and it turned out two National Artists fought each other,” Prayut said at yesterday’s seminar on national strategy. “I’m so worried about this. I think I should stop talking for a month.”

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30319800

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-07-04
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, webfact said:

PM Prayut says "I think I should stop talking for a month.”

Straight from the horse's mouth and difficult to find argument with that. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, webfact said:

“I’m so worried about this. I think I should stop talking for a month.”

 

Comments like these should be considered jail bait for sarcastic old guys like us.

Edited by canuckamuck
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, webfact said:

 “When seeing a barking dog, don’t bark back. It simply tests our instincts, justifying who is genuinely good or bad.”

Naowarat should sincerely think about who the barking dog is.

It's the one only he hears with favor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The P.M. sais:

 

"Just a little bit of my poem stirred another clash. I simply wrote what I had in mind and it turned out two National Artists fought each other,” Prayut said at yesterday’s seminar on national strategy. “I’m so worried about this. I think I should stop talking for a month.”

 

Wow, his best idea so far!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Retiredandhappyhere said:

The P.M. sais:

 

"Just a little bit of my poem stirred another clash. I simply wrote what I had in mind and it turned out two National Artists fought each other,” Prayut said at yesterday’s seminar on national strategy. “I’m so worried about this. I think I should stop talking for a month.”

 

Wow, his best idea so far!

I can't agree. He should keep talking and let his real character shine through so nobody can be in any doubt about the true nature of the man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.





×
×
  • Create New...