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Identifying leak in a flat


Rc2702

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Hi, 

 

I am currently in UK and staying for two weeks with my cousin who has a flat in London.  Yesterday whilst we were out something happened as water was dripping off his ceiling in downstairs lounge. His bathroom is directly above it.  We took the bath panel off as we could not see any water and it was moist underneath but even when we ran the shower for ten minutes the issue did not occur and no leaks were visible.

 

We spoke to his neighbour who confirms she was in the bathroom during the time it happened and the same leak had happened in her lounge too.

 

So we ran the water a lot last night trying to see if this leak was caused by his bathroom. There was not a drop of water whilst we ran the shower or basin for over 10 minutes each.

 

Today it happened again and his neighbour confirmed she was using the basin during the time the leak began.

 

I consulted a tradesman mate who believes the leak is coming from my cousins neighbour.

 

We checked the two flats above and both occupants confirmed no issues.

 

The odd thing is that the neighbours ceiling does not have leakage today but my cousins does.

 

I'm wondering if this is due to the neighbour using the shower yesterday and basin today?

 

The mass of water from the shower causes hers and his ceilings to leak but the basin use only causes my cousins ceiling to be affected?

 

Does this sound correct or am I missing something?

 

When we did the tests on his flat there was no leak at all but some 7 hours later there is a leak which his neighbour confirms was the same time she used the basin.

 

Any plumbers fancy wading in on this I'd be very grateful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Not a plumber but it sounds to me if there is internal under floor interconnecting basin outlet pipes shared with the neighbour the problem leak may be there.

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Don't wait, don't try to find anything else

 

The leak from your cousins neighbour's basin plumbing needs fixing very very urgently. If it isn't it's going to get extremely expensive very quickly and it's probably dangerous as well.

 

You have water pooling on top of the ceilings where you probably have electrical cables for lighting. Water + electricity = danger.

 

You have had water pooling on top of the ceiling which is probably plasterboard. Water + plasterboard + a short time = new ceiling =£££££.

 

Fix the first leak, it maybe the only one. If there's another then fix that.

do it quickly and maybe avoid the new ceilings and the ££££ they will cost

 

If the neighbour is reluctant to get it done quickly let them know that a repair to the house will need them to pay for hotel accommodation for a couple of weeks as well as the repair costs so will cost them several thousand pounds and that insurance will not be paying as the delay is not reasonable 

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Cut a hole in the ceiling where the water is and have a look. The plaster board will be spoiled now anyway and the sooner you find the leak the less of the ceiling you will have to repair. You will need to let it air anyway as the concrete will be saturated where it has been tracking through....

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4 minutes ago, Anythingleft? said:

as the concrete will be saturated where it has been tracking through....

U. K. House, probably not plasterboard under concrete, more likely wood joists.

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4 minutes ago, alfieconn said:

Simple ! just call your insurance people and let them sort it out.

Absolutely the way to go the house contents insurance usually covers that kind of problem, it did when I lived in UK. 

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1 minute ago, Kwasaki said:

Absolutely the way to go the house contents insurance usually covers that kind of problem, it did when I lived in UK. 

It wouldn't be covered under content's but building's insurance and usually flats would have a block policy.

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2 minutes ago, alfieconn said:

It wouldn't be covered under content's but building's insurance and usually flats would have a block policy.

Just remembered we were covered for ceilings etc maybe it was a combined insurance not that expensive and essential if living in a flat I guess.

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Often you can get a leak on the water supply line to specific appliances that doesnt leak until the tap is open.

if its initially soaking into concrete then the leak may never appear if you open taps for say ten minutes, as it dries again before the next use.

 

But the time you use the tap for longer the drips start. Typical on a shower that gets used once a day, or a sink for washing up.

 

Water is probably the single most item that damages buildings inside and out....but thats stating the obvious I know

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1 hour ago, alfieconn said:

It wouldn't be covered under content's but building's insurance and usually flats would have a block policy.

The leasehold flat I have does not have a block policy. I have building insurance, content insurance is my tenants responsibility. So if I lived there it would be house and content insurance.

 

There is almost certainly a clause that states that you must take action as soon as practical once a problem is discovered to minimise damage and that an unreasonable delay will result in reduced cover, my policy certainly has something similar.

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