Jump to content

Beware of marijuana being misused if it’s legalised, says Thai expert


webfact

Recommended Posts

Beware of marijuana being misused if it’s legalised, says expert

By Chularat Saengpassa 
The Nation

 

1c5204231ec4be297ac0eba720f89d59.jpeg

 

Lecturer cites studies disproving claims of marijuana’s medicinal benefits; survey shows 99% support legalisation
 

A MEDICAL lecturer has cautioned policymakers against rushing to legalise marijuana, even if it’s just for medical use.

 

“Beware of becoming stupid, poor and hurt” read the title of a social-media comment posted by Asst Professor Dr Thira Woratanarat in response to calls to fast-track medical-marijuana legislation. 

 

Thira, who works at Chulalongkorn University’s Faculty of Medicine, also posted details about findings from foreign studies, which show that cannabis does not quite live up to some of the claims. 

 

Last week, Government Pharmaceutical Organisation chairman Dr Sopon Mekthon told a seminar that cannabis extracts would be ready for use as early as next January, if the Food and Drug Administration were to issue an announcement declaring it legal for medicinal purposes.

 

Professor Dr Thiravat Hema-chudha, a senior medical lecturer at Chulalongkorn University, has also been calling on Thailand to act quickly, pointing out that Britain took just six weeks to effectively legalise marijuana for medical use. 

 

Both have mentioned the many medical benefits of marijuana. 

 

Yet Thira is unconvinced.

 

“I don’t know if they are looking for research funds or if they have any hidden agenda, but I want to present academic information,” Thira said on social media, without mentioning anyone by name. 

 

13b9d0c7287b60a79eb855fb0c965ce7.jpeg

 

When contacted by The Nation, Thira said he was speaking out of concern that policymakers may not have received well-rounded information before making a decision that would affect an entire nation. 

 

“The impacts will be huge,” he predicted.

 

According to him, a meta-study had already examined more than 1,000 academic articles in a systematic review of medical cannabinoids.

 

“Cannabis extracts may ease chronic pain, but the effects are no better than alcohol consumption. If one has a 0.8 blood-alcohol level, one will not feel that much pain either,” Thira said. He added that it should also be noted that most studies touting cannabis as a painkiller have monitored its impacts for no more than two months. 

 

“Studies monitoring the impacts longer than two months have found that cannabis is not an effective painkiller,” Thira said. 

 

The medical lecturer reckoned the meta-study had concluded that cannabinoids helped with nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy, and delivered some improvement in spasticity. 

 

“But before we start growing cannabis in the hope of developing medicines based on cannabinoids, we need to conduct comprehensive and large-scale research first. Proceed carefully to determine if efforts will be worth it and cost-effective,” Thira said. “Policymakers need to consider social impacts too.” 

 

He added that the largest concern was the proposal to remove cannabis from the list of narcotics. 

 

“How will you control the use of marijuana then? Are you sure it will not leak out of the patients-only stream to the general public?” he asked.

 

Personally, he said, he does not believe Thailand should push hard for the legalisation of marijuana.

 

“Many countries that have legalised marijuana have started realising that this move is leading to many problems,” he said. 

 

He explained that it will be difficult to control the substance once it is declared legal for medical purposes, because some people might start complaining about pain just to get their hands on the narcotic. 

 

“If marijuana is abused, there could be an increase in road accidents and sexual crime,” he said. “We should not be taking such a risk.”

 

Thiravart yesterday argued that one should have the courage to step outside the box and push for development based on what is useful. 

 

“We can develop and apply, but of course, we need to conduct extensive research to ensure that our efforts will be fruitful and effective,” he said.

 

Thiravat said he will speak in favour of legalising marijuana when he attends a meeting with the Public Health Ministry-appointed panel on the legalisation of narcotics today. “But I will insist that we put in place strict control measures to ensure marijuana is used for medical purposes only,” he said. 

 

Separately, the National Legislative Assembly plans to hold a public forum to gather opinions on October 30 on the draft drug law that aims to legalise marijuana. More than 16,400 people have already shared their opinion on the plan via an online survey conducted from October 1 to October 15, and of them, 99 per cent back the idea of legalising some narcotics for a good purpose. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30357032

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-10-24
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Replies 99
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Asst. Professor Dr Thira Woratanarat appears to be an idiot based on his I'll informed comments. First of all, if you make it legal, it takes away alot of the allure for many. Second countless renowned research scientists and physicians worldwide, have proven the medicinal use already. For this second rate hack to even be questioning that is beyond ridiculous. And for anyone to take his questioning seriously, would be even sillier. Make it legal asap. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

"...He explained that it will be difficult to control the substance once it is declared legal for medical purposes, because some people might start complaining about pain just to get their hands on the narcotic..." 

 

Yes, that is exactly what will happen. It is moronic that the pathway to full legalization has to go through this process, but there is it.

 

This doctor is a bleeding idiot. Okay, that is perhaps too much, but the utility of weed as a medicine has been studied to death and the verdict is quite clear; it is a good thing to have.

 

This is simply the same old, tired, whiny arguments that we have heard for generations; they are all based on a misguided notion that weed is bad. Wrong.

 

Legalization IS coming to S E Asia, and the country that does it first will make a financial killing; step up Thailand or watch another reap the rewards.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Weed has never been a bad thing and the ill informed will always try to bring it down. Hopefully Prayuth will see how much money there is to be made by legalisation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, akirasan said:

Reefer madness 2018.

You beat me to it.  He is right the junta generate a plan, but planning, clarity, discussions just aint their style, just barge and bungle along. 

 

In the US, girl scouts are not allowed to sell their cookies within 200 yards of a cannabis dispensary.  Thailand could adopt similar rules for food vendors as well.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Ganja has some serious psychological side-effects such as paranoia, especially the modern strong stuff. it's fine the way it is, if you want it it's there and the police turn a blind eye or take 500 baht to forget it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The troll posts still continue and there have been 4 public warnings.

If these and off topic posts continue members should be aware that 

suspensions may be handed out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, webfact said:

Beware of becoming stupid, poor and hurt” read the title of a social-media comment posted by Asst Professor Dr Thira Woratanarat

too late.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This academic has some legitimate points, although I would like to see evidence regarding the claims of a possible increase in sex crimes.  Why must we call this person a moron or idiot just because we don't agree? The State of Washington where it is legal for recreation and medicine, reported an increase in traffic accidents since the legalization of cannabis.

 

Remember, cannabis was demonized years ago due to a political agenda and now perhaps there is a rush to make it available possibly for state tax revenue. Of course legal or illegal there will be problems. Therefore, I think the question remains: How can cannabis be managed better, legal or illegal? It seems as though the war on drugs has not been so successful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, webfact said:

“Many countries that have legalised marijuana have started realising that this move is leading to many problems,” he said.

Really? Which "many countries" would that be, Mr. Thira?

 

As far as I am aware (and I am not a "Thai expert"), there is only a tiny handful of countries that has approved marijuana (or cannabinoids) for medicinal use, and even fewer have completely legalized it.

 

I also dare to doubt that the decriminalization "led to many problems" or that there was "an increase in road accidents and sexual crime" because of it.

 

It's probably true that a person who has consumed marijuana shouldn't be steering a motor vehicle because cannabis slows down your reaction time. But then again, you also shouldn't be driving after taking certain fever relieving drugs and pain killers or alcohol.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

i promise i will not misuse it. I have an all new celebratory bong design waiting to make up for this wonderful occasion.

This is the first step to full legalization and if the government was smart they would skip the medical only step as it will create too many issues with people making up stories to get something that really aint so bad.

Give the people what they want. As far as im concerned these people can tax the hell out of it. I dont drink or smoke tobacco so if they want my money legalize it for all and open up shops selling it legitimately.

The violence, crime and chaotic enviroment we live in im sure would change for the better pretty quick. The dreadlock smelly hippy vibe would fade. Most people dont realize that a lot of high profile people smoke including doctors, scientists and so on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Misterwhisper said:

Really? Which "many countries" would that be, Mr. Thira?

 

As far as I am aware (and I am not a "Thai expert"), there is only a tiny handful of countries that has approved marijuana (or cannabinoids) for medicinal use, and even fewer have completely legalized it.

 

Of course none of them have ever reported that the decriminalization "led to many problems" nor that there was "an increase in road accidents and sexual crime" because of it.   

Agree with your points, I think that the problems he is referring to is people using medicinal ganga for other purposes such as listening to Bob Marley. It has happened in other countries where it was approved for medicinal but not recreational use. You do not have to be much of an "expert" to foresee some of these same issues occurring here also if medical ganga is legalized.

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Misterwhisper said:

Really? Which "many countries" would that be, Mr. Thira?

 

As far as I am aware (and I am not a "Thai expert"), there is only a tiny handful of countries that has approved marijuana (or cannabinoids) for medicinal use, and even fewer have completely legalized it.

 

I also dare to doubt that the decriminalization "led to many problems" or that there was "an increase in road accidents and sexual crime" because of it.

 

It's probably true that a person who has consumed marijuana shouldn't be steering a motor vehicle because cannabis slows down your reaction time. But then again, you also shouldn't be driving after taking certain fever relieving drugs and pain killers or alcohol.   

I went back and read the full article. This guy may be an expert in something, but he is clearly not that smart especially about marijuana. Also you do not need to have big pharmaceutical companies "develop drugs from marijuana" it can be used as an oil, extract, or in dried plant form without any involvement from any drug maker. It is not a narcotic so removing it from a list of narcotics should not be problematic at all. It has clearly demonstrated beneficial medicinal uses, although some claims have been exaggerated a bit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, webfact said:

Beware of marijuana being misused if it’s legalised, says expert

 

Sigh.

 

Beware of marijuana being misused whether it’s legalized or not, replies everyone else.

 

If you can't construct a cogent argument against something, then maybe that's because there isn't one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Though I would live to get my hands on a prescription, for medical reasons of course, I worry about Thai drivers driving around stoned. There are enough drunks on the road already,and smoking seriously affects your driving abilities. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, jonclark said:

2Prior to 1979 the sale and consumption Marijuana was legal in Thailand....maybe that is why Thailand was once known as the land of smiles.

 

 

That could not be more wrong. It has been illegal here since the 1940's. Where in the world did you hear that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

This gentleman is a doctor and medical lecturer, and like much of the "established" medical community views alternative remedies as a threat.  I have seen firsthand the effectiveness of cannabis oil in treating cancer......a family member whose brain tumors were reduced to the point that the doctor had difficulty to identify them on MRI.  There are many such real testimonials out there, but this is far cheaper and more humane than chemotherapy; which generates massive revenues for big pharma and, by extension, for doctors.

Link to post
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, wombat said:

never in the history of mankind has so much money been spent on trying to prove how bad one plant is and ends in failure every time.

 

The good/bad cannabis roller-coaster ride has been ongoing since pre-1900.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...