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Planning to plant some trees and was wondering if any species like each other or if there are ones that don't like to be near each other?

Regular things like mangoes, jackfruit, bananas, mangosteen etc.

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Plant them in square holes,not round,in round holes the roots

just go round and not out into the ground, learnt that on Gardeners

World.

regards worgeordie

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You should also consider what type of soil you have,not all trees will grow well in the same soil.

We just planted a lot some ten years ago and later we decided what to keep and what  not.

Plant some extra,it is a lot easier to handle that way.

 

 

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Search for allelopathic trees and plants. They are not so many. Mango, jackfruit, banana seem to grow everywhere. Banana likes company of other bananas. They create their own micro environment and are happier that way. Alone out in the wind and sun makes them unhappy.

 

Guava and mulberry are easy growing small trees to plant between the bigger. Young trees need some shade from sun the first year. If you have the time plant some fast growing legumes first and let them provide shade and fertility. Pigeon peas, sesbania are fast growing and will give you good shade for the fruit trees. They provide carbon and nutrition to the ground when shopped down after a year or two when they done their job.

 

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9 minutes ago, Pogust said:

Search for allelopathic trees and plants. They are not so many. Mango, jackfruit, banana seem to grow everywhere. Banana likes company of other bananas. They create their own micro environment and are happier that way. Alone out in the wind and sun makes them unhappy.

 

Guava and mulberry are easy growing small trees to plant between the bigger. Young trees need some shade from sun the first year. If you have the time plant some fast growing legumes first and let them provide shade and fertility. Pigeon peas, sesbania are fast growing and will give you good shade for the fruit trees. They provide carbon and nutrition to the ground when shopped down after a year or two when they done their job.

 

Which fruit tree do you recommend that don't need regular watering? I don't have time to water them often.

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, EricTh said:

 

Which fruit tree do you recommend that don't need regular watering? I don't have time to water them often.

 

 

 

Depends on your local climate, where in Thailand you are. Best check with locals what is working there with little watering. Go for trees with a deep tap root, they will reach water easier in the dry season.

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14 hours ago, Pogust said:

Depends on your local climate, where in Thailand you are. Best check with locals what is working there with little watering. Go for trees with a deep tap root, they will reach water easier in the dry season.

Chiang Mai area.

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On 6/10/2020 at 11:08 PM, EricTh said:

I don't have time to water them often.

Sorry but I have an issue with this comment. If you can't take care of something, why would you want it?

Having vented that. Moringa is a no water needed type tree once established that is very high protein. Something for nothing really!

 

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Northern Thailand is a tropical savanna climate. It is critical to recognize there is a pronounced dry period that can go roughly half the year with little to no rain at all.

 

In terms of dozens of fruit tree varieties I have experience with including all of those mentioned in your original post I have noticed established fruit trees can indeed sustain themselves in this climate without watering them. But young trees need water or they suffer, die or become severely stunted and useless. Planting early in the wet season and letting them go isn't enough to get them started because the wet season can have deadly dry spells and after the rains are over asking a young tree that's only been out of the pot for a few months to go half a year without a drop of water is too much. I would for sure guarantee trees gets plenty of water at least the first two or three years.

 

If you really can't water at all you'd want to restrict to the most native, hardy of all trees and think beyond fruit to other edibles. Things like betel nuts, wild forest bananas (NOT any of the good banana types), bamboo, oroxylum, guava. Watering is still beneficial to minimize losses and maximize growth, but they have a good chance of making it and becoming decent even without. The advantage of such plantings is they are also remarkably good at taking care of themselves and don't need sprayed for pests or even fertilized.

 

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On 6/10/2020 at 10:08 PM, EricTh said:

 

Which fruit tree do you recommend that don't need regular watering? I don't have time to water them often.

 

 

 

Pomegranate only needs watering about once per week. 

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On 6/9/2020 at 12:12 PM, worgeordie said:

Plant them in square holes,not round,in round holes the roots

just go round and not out into the ground, learnt that on Gardeners

World.

regards worgeordie

interesting!

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On 6/9/2020 at 12:12 PM, worgeordie said:

Plant them in square holes,not round,in round holes the roots

just go round and not out into the ground, learnt that on Gardeners

World.

regards worgeordie

So the roots will creep along the straight side of the hole until they reach a 90 degree bend and think 'Oh f..k it,I'm not going round that, I'll dig into the earth straight ahead instead'

Or do the roots grow downwards. I'll have to ask Bill Sourbutts, or John Titchmarsh, or even Kim Wilde?   LOL  

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1 hour ago, stouricks said:

So the roots will creep along the straight side of the hole until they reach a 90 degree bend and think 'Oh f..k it,I'm not going round that, I'll dig into the earth straight ahead instead'

Or do the roots grow downwards. I'll have to ask Bill Sourbutts, or John Titchmarsh, or even Kim Wilde?   LOL  

Don't blame me, I am only passing on information that I heard from

people who have a lot more knowledge than I, on gardening,just take

it or leave it. sometimes you can learn things on TVF, believe it or not.

regards Worgeordie           P.S. Who is John Titchmarsh ? I know of Alan Titchmarsh, the gardener.

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1 hour ago, worgeordie said:

Don't blame me, I am only passing on information that I heard from

people who have a lot more knowledge than I, on gardening,just take

it or leave it. sometimes you can learn things on TVF, believe it or not.

regards Worgeordie           P.S. Who is John Titchmarsh ? I know of Alan Titchmarsh, the gardener.

His twin brother  555   LOL.   I was, in my usual fashion, being flippant about putting that round tree in a square hole. I appreciate most of what you post. Regards. 

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3 hours ago, worgeordie said:

Don't blame me, I am only passing on information that I heard from

people who have a lot more knowledge than I, on gardening,just take

it or leave it. sometimes you can learn things on TVF, believe it or not.

regards Worgeordie           P.S. Who is John Titchmarsh ? I know of Alan Titchmarsh, the gardener.

But who was Bill Sowerbutts you ask. No? Well I am going to tell you anyway.

Started on the BBC Home Service was Gardeners Questiontime on 9th April 1947, about the time I was conceived and came from the 'singing room' of The Broadoak Hotel in Ashton-under-Lyne, my home town and my local pub in later life. I don't think my Mum missed a single episode, we had a lovely garden.

Off topic, but that's where the wonderful Fivepenny Piece started, and Bill Tarmey (Jack Duckworth) was guest jazz singer in 90s.

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5 minutes ago, stouricks said:

But who was Bill Sowerbutts you ask. No? Well I am going to tell you anyway.

Started on the BBC Home Service was Gardeners Questiontime on 9th April 1947, about the time I was conceived and came from the 'singing room' of The Broadoak Hotel in Ashton-under-Lyne, my home town and my local pub in later life. I don't think my Mum missed a single episode, we had a lovely garden.

Off topic, but that's where the wonderful Fivepenny Piece started, and Bill Tarmey (Jack Duckworth) was guest jazz singer in 90s.

I told you , you can learn something new everyday on TVF, I did not know that.

regards worgeordie

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