Jump to content

U.S. and Thailand Work Together in Search for Missing WWII Airman


webfact
 Share

Recommended Posts

030322-U.S.-and-Thailand-Work-Together-in-Search-for-Missing-WWII-Airman_11-1140x684.jpg

The U.S. government launched a joint U.S.-Thailand operation in search of an American pilot missing for more than 70 years.

 

The airman, along with his P-38 aircraft, are believed to have gone down near Baan Mae Kua village, in Sop Prap district of Lampang province during World War II.

 

Nine specialists have arrived from the U.S. Defense Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Accounting Agency’s Hawaii headquarters to conduct the search mission, supported by the Baan Mae Kua community. Chargé d’Affaires Michael Heath, Consul General Sean O’Neill, and Colonel Alongkot Donmoon, representing the Governor of Lampang Province visited the site to meet with the team and learn about their specific duties, while assisting in the search.

 

CDA Heath said: “After more than 70 years the United States is still working to bring home all of our service members. This humanitarian mission is a symbol of the great cooperation and friendship between the United States and Thailand. On behalf of the United States of America and the American people, I want to express gratitude to the local community, the local authorities, and the government of Thailand for helping us fulfill our sacred duty and promise to the nation.”

 

Major Brian W. Smith, the mission commander, said: “Our goal here is to give the fullest possible accounting of the incident and maintain open communication with the families of the missing. A sincere thank you to our Thai hosts for helping us bring our service members home.”

 

Approximately 81,600 American personnel are still unaccounted for from past conflicts. The U.S. government is committed to providing the fullest possible accounting of the missing to the nation and their families. This mission is the first significant recovery operation in Thailand since 2007. In July 2018, DPAA obtained new information regarding three missing U.S. World War II aircraft located in northern Thailand which led to further investigation of the missing aircraft reports in the area.  Each of these losses is associated with a U.S. service member who has yet to be accounted for. This mission has been made possible by extensive research conducted by both historians and volunteers from both Thailand and the United States, and incorporates information learned from eyewitness accounts.

 

For further information on the missing American Service Member or DPAA and its mission please refer to DPAA’s website at www.DPAA.mil.

 

Source: https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-and-thailand-work-together-in-search-for-missing-wwii-airman/

 

US.jpg

-- © Copyright U.S. Embassy 2022-03-05

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, webfact said:

Approximately 81,600 American personnel are still unaccounted for from past conflicts

A way to run an army, parents send their children to war thinking the army will take care of them only for many to disappear for ever, 81,600 missing soldiers is way to huge a toll to bare...

  • Like 1
  • Confused 2
  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thai's have never been big in burying bodies so at a guess I would say that 75 years ago some Thai's found the body and had it cremated at the local Temple.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Russell17au said:

Thai's have never been big in burying bodies so at a guess I would say that 75 years ago some Thai's found the body and had it cremated at the local Temple.

Having seen what's left over after modern cremations, I suspect that even if cremated 75 years ago (low tech, low heat) there would still be sufficient remains to make a positive ID.

Link to post
Share on other sites

**** Removed post edited out ****

 

One thing I admire about the US is their commitment to bring home their MIA's.

Edited by metisdead
Link to post
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Russell17au said:

Thai's have never been big in burying bodies so at a guess I would say that 75 years ago some Thai's found the body and had it cremated at the local Temple.

If that happened they'd likely have turned over his dog tag,

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/5/2022 at 6:28 PM, ozimoron said:

**** Removed post edited out ****

 

One thing I admire about the US is their commitment to bring home their MIA's.

ok, but what is "home"? this man died over 70 years ago. His children if any are probably dead too, and he would be a stranger to his grandchildren. Buried in some state cemetery, it's honorable but serves no practical purpose while the expense must be very considerable. Anyway, since they are here I wish them success.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, arithai12 said:

ok, but what is "home"? this man died over 70 years ago. His children if any are probably dead too, and he would be a stranger to his grandchildren. Buried in some state cemetery, it's honorable but serves no practical purpose while the expense must be very considerable. Anyway, since they are here I wish them success.

Unhelpful would be the kindest spin I could put on your comment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ozimoron said:

Unhelpful would be the kindest spin I could put on your comment.

Ouch.

ok, I admit that I am not subscribing to the romantic idea that, 70 years after the fact, a mission of 9 officers from US and untold numbers of locals team together out of the blue to find this particular body. Since you seem very excited by this, perhaps you can offer an explanation of why they waited so long? And, to reiterate on my comment, what exactly is the "open communication with the families of the missing" in this case?

 

Cynical that I am, this seems more like "here's an idea to spend that leftover budget so we show that we used all funds for this fiscal year".

Link to post
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, arithai12 said:

Ouch.

ok, I admit that I am not subscribing to the romantic idea that, 70 years after the fact, a mission of 9 officers from US and untold numbers of locals team together out of the blue to find this particular body. Since you seem very excited by this, perhaps you can offer an explanation of why they waited so long? And, to reiterate on my comment, what exactly is the "open communication with the families of the missing" in this case?

 

Cynical that I am, this seems more like "here's an idea to spend that leftover budget so we show that we used all funds for this fiscal year".

Your predicate that they waited so long is false. The US has always searched for their MIA's.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, ozimoron said:

Your predicate that they waited so long is false. The US has always searched for their MIA's.

'This mission is the first significant recovery operation in Thailand since 2007. '

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/5/2022 at 6:28 AM, ozimoron said:

**** Removed post edited out ****

 

One thing I admire about the US is their commitment to bring home their MIA's.

One only hope.   Back in late 1971 or early 1972, a Laotian army unit reported to Hanoi, they were moving French POW's to a new compound.   The French government, allegedly, had ransomed or somehow repatriated all the POW's left after the war they were in before being kicked out of SEA.  Based on intell intercepts, they didn't!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...