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What benefit offers the registration of the marriage in your country?


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If a marriage is registrered at the Amphur, the marriage is legal in Thailand and in your country.
You are married.

What benefit offers the registration of the marriage again in your country?

I was married to a Thai before, and the benefits of regsitrering the marriage in my country was that I would get a "Family Book".
This "Family Book" would not be made if the marriage was only registrered in Thailand.

Anxious to know what other countries offer .....

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You are focused on the benefits of registering your marriage in your home country. I tend to focus on reasons for doing something. For me, the main reason would be that it makes my life easier moving between two countries. Registering my marriage in my home country was the first step that leads to permanent residency and citizenship.

 

There are spousal benefits available to my wife upon my death because of the registration of our marriage.

 

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A quick question about marriage registration. My Thai wife and I have been married over 25 years. Married in the UAE and duly registered there. Also registered in the USA via her green card process. However, we've been living in Thailand for the last 22 years and we have never done anything to register our marriage here. Question is, do we need to register our marriage here and what benefits are gained by doing so? Appreciate your input.

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54 minutes ago, paulbrow said:

A quick question about marriage registration. My Thai wife and I have been married over 25 years. Married in the UAE and duly registered there. Also registered in the USA via her green card process. However, we've been living in Thailand for the last 22 years and we have never done anything to register our marriage here. Question is, do we need to register our marriage here and what benefits are gained by doing so? Appreciate your input.

If you want a Marriage Visa/extension then to the best of my Knowledge you need to register your marriage at your local Amphur to get the KOR 2.   Benefits are less income needed/money in the bank you can spend.

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In Australia, your Thai wife will be entitled to apply for a partner visa. Once received (and assuming she moves to Australia), she can work, buy property, is covered by free health insurance etc. After 2 years, if she is still married and living with her husband, she will get permanent residency.

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Would be none, unless she lived their (USA), as not entitled to anything, govt has to offer.  Even if returned, she would get anything, unless living there for at least 3 or 5 yrs.

 

To get anything, we'd have to not tell anyone, and if she entered illegally, then jackpot, free everything,😂  

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An Australian friend registered his Thai marriage in Australia resulting in his government pension being reduced to receiving half the married rate which is less than the single rate.’

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I am Danish and I save about THB 7000 in Danish tax pr. month, because I get 2 times the deductible personal amount since I am married. The wife do not need to have ever been in Denmark.

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1 hour ago, perconrad said:

I am Danish and I save about THB 7000 in Danish tax pr. month, because I get 2 times the deductible personal amount since I am married. The wife do not need to have ever been in Denmark.

Again the UK treats it's 'citizens' appallingly when compared to european cousins. I am only allowed to transfer approx 12pc of my wife's personal allowance and she doesn't get any of my state pension when I die coupled with restricted access to the NHS despite me paying full tax on all my pensions

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A few days after I married my girlfriend in Thailand, now almost 2 decades ago, I went to the Embassy to ask if I needed to regularize my marriage in Belgium.
The answer was "Yes"and they gave me a list of documents that I needed to bring to the Embassy.
Make copies of a lot of documents, legalize and certify the copies at Chang Watthana, translate the copies by a certified translator, etc.
A lot of money spend only on certifications and translations.
A few weeks after the regularization of my marriage, my wife went to visit her mother.
At the house of her mother (my wife still had her address with her mother)  an assigned letter from Belgium had arrived.
It was a letter from my Bank in Belgium, who send a Credit Card and all the details of my bank account.
Luckelly, I could intercept that Credit Card in time and detroy it before anybody else could use it.
Later I asked the bank why they had send a Credit Card to my wife without telling me and the answer was: "You are married to "Ms. xxxx" now and according to the Belgian law your wife has full access to your bank account now (Share of belongings)".
 

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3 hours ago, chilly07 said:

Again the UK treats it's 'citizens' appallingly when compared to european cousins. I am only allowed to transfer approx 12pc of my wife's personal allowance and she doesn't get any of my state pension when I die coupled with restricted access to the NHS despite me paying full tax on all my pensions

Is that a fall-out of Brexit?

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8 hours ago, Stevemercer said:

In Australia, your Thai wife will be entitled to apply for a partner visa. Once received (and assuming she moves to Australia), she can work, buy property, is covered by free health insurance etc. After 2 years, if she is still married and living with her husband, she will get permanent residency.

yes, and she'll be entitled to 50% of all your worldly possessions....a person would be a fool to register a Thai marriage in their home country unless they were looking for residency in that country....

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9 hours ago, StevieAus said:

An Australian friend registered his Thai marriage in Australia resulting in his government pension being reduced to receiving half the married rate which is less than the single rate.’

Only an old fool would do this. Especially if he has assets there...

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11 hours ago, jack71 said:

Only an old fool would do this. Especially if he has assets there...

Yes I agree but this person did other foolish things which means now he only owns a motorbike in his name !!

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18 hours ago, chilly07 said:

Again the UK treats it's 'citizens' appallingly when compared to european cousins. I am only allowed to transfer approx 12pc of my wife's personal allowance and she doesn't get any of my state pension when I die coupled with restricted access to the NHS despite me paying full tax on all my pensions

If you think that the UK treats  its citizens appallingly look at Australia where the aged pension is means tested.

I paid personal and company tax during my working life and get zero.

Many of my friends are in the same position.

If you are living overseas you have to return to Australia to apply and have to remain for two years or the pension is cancelled.

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23 hours ago, brianthainess said:

If you want a Marriage Visa/extension then to the best of my Knowledge you need to register your marriage at your local Amphur to get the KOR 2.   Benefits are less income needed/money in the bank you can spend.

Thanks for your input. So, other than the marriage visa issue (which I don't need or want), there's no other plusses or minuses to registering the marriage?

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On 4/21/2022 at 11:44 AM, Confuscious said:

A few days after I married my girlfriend in Thailand, now almost 2 decades ago, I went to the Embassy to ask if I needed to regularize my marriage in Belgium.
The answer was "Yes"and they gave me a list of documents that I needed to bring to the Embassy.
Make copies of a lot of documents, legalize and certify the copies at Chang Watthana, translate the copies by a certified translator, etc.
A lot of money spend only on certifications and translations.
A few weeks after the regularization of my marriage, my wife went to visit her mother.
At the house of her mother (my wife still had her address with her mother)  an assigned letter from Belgium had arrived.
It was a letter from my Bank in Belgium, who send a Credit Card and all the details of my bank account.
Luckelly, I could intercept that Credit Card in time and detroy it before anybody else could use it.
Later I asked the bank why they had send a Credit Card to my wife without telling me and the answer was: "You are married to "Ms. xxxx" now and according to the Belgian law your wife has full access to your bank account now (Share of belongings)".
 

Did she have an income? And if so, did this affect your tax return in Belgium?

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I'm a US citizen married to a Thai, and one benefit I get is a break when filing my taxes, get a bigger return when going the "married filing jointly" route.

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7 hours ago, Nico100 said:

Did she have an income? And if so, did this affect your tax return in Belgium?

1. She had no income when we married.

2. The taxing system in Belgium is following:
    Tax is being levied in the income, folllowing a scale system.
     Each step on the scale is divided by 3:
   a Living alone (Celibacy) = FULL taxes on that income scale
   b Living together with a somebody (family member; girlfriend/boyfriend; etc.) = deduction on that scale.
     The deduction depends on weither the member has an own income or not and how much income he/she has.
     Living together with children: deduction on that scale a ratio from amount of children and age of the children.
  c Married = lowest taxes

In my case:
1. Taxes were calculated on "Married" + "No income", which resulted in a tax reduction of 20% (about 150 Euro).
2. Pension for "Married" + "No income", which was about 250 Euro/month extra.

HTH
 

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1 hour ago, Confuscious said:

1. She had no income when we married.

2. The taxing system in Belgium is following:
    Tax is being levied in the income, folllowing a scale system.
     Each step on the scale is divided by 3:
   a Living alone (Celibacy) = FULL taxes on that income scale
   b Living together with a somebody (family member; girlfriend/boyfriend; etc.) = deduction on that scale.
     The deduction depends on weither the member has an own income or not and how much income he/she has.
     Living together with children: deduction on that scale a ratio from amount of children and age of the children.
  c Married = lowest taxes

In my case:
1. Taxes were calculated on "Married" + "No income", which resulted in a tax reduction of 20% (about 150 Euro).
2. Pension for "Married" + "No income", which was about 250 Euro/month extra.

HTH
 

Interesting, thanks for this detailed answer!

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