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Transfer Money From Japan To Thailand


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I'm a Bank of America member in Tokyo and have tried like 4 different ways already to get about 5,000USD to Thailand (to Bangkok Bank) and none of them seem feasible... I just don't know what I can do. For one, BofA doesn't have any offices here, so I can't withdraw any more money than what the ATM allows. I have a debit card, apparently that MIGHT work at a Western Union, but lucky me, Western Union's phone number here doesn't work and they're like an hour from my apartment... and don't they charge like $50 for transfers? I can write a check to Bangkok Bank, but oh, that'll take 45 days to process she says. <deleted>??!! I called Bangkok Bank in Tokyo, what luck again, their number is invalid as well, that's assuming they'd even speak English. There's got to be a way to do this. Please help

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I'm a Bank of America member in Tokyo and have tried like 4 different ways already to get about 5,000USD to Thailand (to Bangkok Bank) and none of them seem feasible... I just don't know what I can do. For one, BofA doesn't have any offices here, so I can't withdraw any more money than what the ATM allows. I have a debit card, apparently that MIGHT work at a Western Union, but lucky me, Western Union's phone number here doesn't work and they're like an hour from my apartment... and don't they charge like $50 for transfers? I can write a check to Bangkok Bank, but oh, that'll take 45 days to process she says. <deleted>??!! I called Bangkok Bank in Tokyo, what luck again, their number is invalid as well, that's assuming they'd even speak English. There's got to be a way to do this. Please help

Do BofA have Internet banking? Why don't you do that online?

Technically and legally there is no difference if I am sending money from an Australian Bank (StGeorge) that does not have an office in Tokyo to Bangkok Bank via the Internet. Done that hundreds of times.

BKK Bank in Tokyo does not do retail banking, no need to even contact them.

Edited by think_too_mut
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Svenn,

Transferring money from Japan to Thailand is a snap :o

Here are your choices:

Western Union - They charge an arm and a leg, but the money will get there. By the way, they will close up shop in Japan on 31 Jan 2009. The contract was not renewed.

Citibank - Open an account and you should be able to transfer money. Cost is JPY 4,000. However, if you have more than JPY 10mil in the bank the transfer fees are waved. I think you can transfer without having an account, but not sure.

Lloyds TSB Japan - The easiest way to send funds. Cost is JPY 2,000 per transfer! Cheap as chips. Bring your passport and gaijin card (I think) to their office located near Tamaike-Sanno station in Tokyo. Not too far from the US Embassy... Here is the website lloydstsb.co.jp

I recommend Lloyds as signing up is very, very painless. Also you can get a bank transfer card so that you will be able to send money from just about any ATM in Japan.

If you want to do a practice transfer... I have a Kasikorn account which needs refilling. :D

Enjoy!

TheWalkingMan

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Svenn,

Transferring money from Japan to Thailand is a snap

Here are your choices:

Western Union - They charge an arm and a leg, but the money will get there. By the way, they will close up shop in Japan on 31 Jan 2009. The contract was not renewed.

Citibank - Open an account and you should be able to transfer money. Cost is JPY 4,000. However, if you have more than JPY 10mil in the bank the transfer fees are waved. I think you can transfer without having an account, but not sure.

Lloyds TSB Japan - The easiest way to send funds. Cost is JPY 2,000 per transfer! Cheap as chips. Bring your passport and gaijin card (I think) to their office located near Tamaike-Sanno station in Tokyo. Not too far from the US Embassy... Here is the website lloydstsb.co.jp

I recommend Lloyds as signing up is very, very painless. Also you can get a bank transfer card so that you will be able to send money from just about any ATM in Japan.

Nothing is so easy.

Firstly, if he does not have a job and ID card he can not open an account anywhere in Japan.

To transfer money from Citibank via Lloyds to any account (I've done that more than monthly over 6 years) he has to register Citibank account with them and after few days the permission is granted.

The transfer card is a "Help card" that saves him from typing account details over and over again - Citibank staff made it for me when I transferred money first time.

Lloyds has to be the registered account with Citibank too, only then he can move money there and then Lloyds to an account (BKK Bank) also registered with them.

So, to send money to Thailand, the process was:

Citibank -> Llloyds -> WestPac

Westpac ATM card located in Thailand was used to take the money out.

Cost: 430 Yen for Citibank -> Lloyds leg (treated as intrenal transfer) , then they get their cut via exchange rate when sending to Westpac.

Edited by think_too_mut
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Svenn,

Transferring money from Japan to Thailand is a snap :o

Lloyds TSB Japan - The easiest way to send funds. Cost is JPY 2,000 per transfer! Cheap as chips. Bring your passport and gaijin card (I think) to their office located near Tamaike-Sanno station in Tokyo. Not too far from the US Embassy... Here is the website lloydstsb.co.jp

I recommend Lloyds as signing up is very, very painless. Also you can get a bank transfer card so that you will be able to send money from just about any ATM in Japan.

If you want to do a practice transfer... I have a Kasikorn account which needs refilling. :D

Enjoy!

TheWalkingMan

Thanks Walking Man. I called Lloyd's- they said that because my ATM doesn't allow me to get $5000 out in cash, It'd be easier if i set up a new account at lloyds, went to a local atm here and transferred the money into that new account (which will only cost 200 yen), then do the 2000 yen transfer. I'm not sure BofA will allow me to do that second step, to transfer $5000 in a tokyo atm machine to another bank, but we'll have to see. I've actually never heard of doing wire transfers in atm machines before. anyone know if it works?

Anyway, lloyds said it would take a week to set up my new account there. that's ok.

Oh, on their website it says if you refer someone to lloyds, you will be given 2000 yen! not sure if u can collect that or not walking man. Yes, I get weary from looking at all those zeros in my account balance, maybe I'll give my eyes a rest and send you a practice transfer to ease the load :D

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Nothing is so easy.

Firstly, if he does not have a job and ID card he can not open an account anywhere in Japan.

To transfer money from Citibank via Lloyds to any account (I've done that more than monthly over 6 years) he has to register Citibank account with them and after few days the permission is granted.

The transfer card is a "Help card" that saves him from typing account details over and over again - Citibank staff made it for me when I transferred money first time.

Lloyds has to be the registered account with Citibank too, only then he can move money there and then Lloyds to an account (BKK Bank) also registered with them.

So, to send money to Thailand, the process was:

Citibank -> Llloyds -> WestPac

Westpac ATM card located in Thailand was used to take the money out.

Cost: 430 Yen for Citibank -> Lloyds leg (treated as intrenal transfer) , then they get their cut via exchange rate when sending to Westpac.

Hmm, not sure I follow that exactly, but are you describing what I was told to do by lloyd's in the post above this one?

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sweet baby je$us! bank of america customer service is f-king closed! What modern corporate bank doesn't have a 24/7 call center??? I've had just about enough of this bank, everything with them is impossible. All I want to know is if I can use a Japanese Atm to transfer money from my account to my new one at Lloyd's.

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...I've actually never heard of doing wire transfers in atm machines before. anyone know if it works?

Wire Transfer By ATM

Actually what happens is that you transfer funds from your ABC Bank account to your registered account at Lloyds. This registered account has the details of the specific account overseas that you want the funds to go to. I don't know the mechanics of how things work once you transfer the money. I am hoping it is automatic. A few days after the transfer, you will get a letter in the mail saying that it has been completed. Not sure why they have not moved to an email notification system, surely that would save time and manpower.

If you have 3 different accounts overseas ie USA, Thailand, Canada you would have 3 accounts to transfer to.

Cheers,

TheWalkingMan

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...I've actually never heard of doing wire transfers in atm machines before. anyone know if it works?

Wire Transfer By ATM

Actually what happens is that you transfer funds from your ABC Bank account to your registered account at Lloyds. This registered account has the details of the specific account overseas that you want the funds to go to. I don't know the mechanics of how things work once you transfer the money. I am hoping it is automatic. A few days after the transfer, you will get a letter in the mail saying that it has been completed. Not sure why they have not moved to an email notification system, surely that would save time and manpower.

If you have 3 different accounts overseas ie USA, Thailand, Canada you would have 3 accounts to transfer to.

Cheers,

TheWalkingMan

hmm, so it takes a few days for this transfer from my American bank to go into my account here at Lloyd's? The thing I don't get is why it's only 200 yen, because in reality it's just a full-blown international wire transfer. I'm worried BofA will have some hidden fee to do it, that will cancel out the apprently 'good' deal of a 2000 yen at Lloyd's.

Actually, with all the subway tickets, photo-taking for the alien registration card (gaijin card), etc., I'm beginning to think Western Union might be a better option. Anyone know how much that costs here in Tokyo and if you need the gaijin-card for it? do I need to give them cash or can they make it work by using my debit card?

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Postal money order always worked for me, and it isn't expensive, but it does take time and planning ahead- plus you have to be there. Sounds like the other guys gave you good answers.

How does that work in Japan?

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Nothing is so easy.

Firstly, if he does not have a job and ID card he can not open an account anywhere in Japan.

To transfer money from Citibank via Lloyds to any account (I've done that more than monthly over 6 years) he has to register Citibank account with them and after few days the permission is granted.

The transfer card is a "Help card" that saves him from typing account details over and over again - Citibank staff made it for me when I transferred money first time.

Lloyds has to be the registered account with Citibank too, only then he can move money there and then Lloyds to an account (BKK Bank) also registered with them.

So, to send money to Thailand, the process was:

Citibank -> Llloyds -> WestPac

Westpac ATM card located in Thailand was used to take the money out.

Cost: 430 Yen for Citibank -> Lloyds leg (treated as intrenal transfer) , then they get their cut via exchange rate when sending to Westpac.

Hmm, not sure I follow that exactly, but are you describing what I was told to do by lloyd's in the post above this one?

They probably can't believe that you are even trying to walk in and open an account without having an Japanese ID card and a job in Japan.

If you are OK in that regard, it will be as they said.

If you are not, it is impossible to open an account anywhere in Japan.

Can you imagine what Russian mafia would do....Vladivostok is 1 hour flight from Japan.

And transfers are 430Y although they are full blown international transfers. That is what you see between a Japanese bank account and Lloyds. They (Lloyds) skin you with their exchange rate + 2000Y.

ATM wire transfer (thyat's how I have been doing it for years) works between 10am and 3pm weekdays. Money sent from Japan to anywhere (in my case to Lloyds Japan and from them to Westpac) comes into the Oz bank account at 3pm.

"Cash in letter" exists in Japan but I have never used it and I doubt it will be valid for international mail.

Edited by think_too_mut
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ATM wire transfer (thyat's how I have been doing it for years) works between 10am and 3pm weekdays. Money sent from Japan to anywhere (in my case to Lloyds Japan and from them to Westpac) comes into the Oz bank account at 3pm.

"Cash in letter" exists in Japan but I have never used it and I doubt it will be valid for international mail.

Wait, so if you can transfer to Oz, why don't i just use the ATM to transfer from my account to the my wive's in Bkk Bank, and forget about all these nonsense with 2000 yen and openening an account at lloyd's?

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ATM wire transfer (thyat's how I have been doing it for years) works between 10am and 3pm weekdays. Money sent from Japan to anywhere (in my case to Lloyds Japan and from them to Westpac) comes into the Oz bank account at 3pm.

"Cash in letter" exists in Japan but I have never used it and I doubt it will be valid for international mail.

Wait, so if you can transfer to Oz, why don't i just use the ATM to transfer from my account to the my wive's in Bkk Bank, and forget about all these nonsense with 2000 yen and openening an account at lloyd's?

To prevent Russian mafia and anyone, even well intended people, from manipulating money.

In more details, this is why:

The ATM card has to belong to the bank which ATM you are using to do the transfer; in my case, Japanese branch of Citibank.

The account you are transfering to has to be submitted, checked, approved and registered by the bank (Japanese bank).

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Got the following email from Bangkok Bank, Tokyo branch- this looks like it might work, but no mention of costs... maybe the whole thing is free?:

1. Firstly, accourding to Japanese Law of Anti-Money Laundering, our

remittance policy requires customers to make the registeration of Foreign

remittance. (We can send the application form and guidline by mail if you

give us of your address in Japan.)

2. After we receive your complete of our Foreign remittace register

apllication with necessary attached copy of your identification card

such: Alien registration card, driver licence or Health insurance card.

However we can accept the application by only original mail.

3. For our reply is take around 5 business day to check the details and

send you of the registered number of applicant code number and guideline to

your address which same as mentioned on your identification with address

is in Japan.

4. The way of making remittance you can either come to Bangkok Bank, Tokyo

branch or domestice transfer to our Tokyo branch's account via ATM of

Japanese bank.

**However if you make domestic transfer, with in office hour at 15.00 of

the day to be accept. If you make domestic transfer after 15.00, your

remittance

will be process on the following day.

5. For the remittance currency, it is depended on currency of your wife

account

in Thailand if your wife holding USD account in Thailand, you can make

remittance

from JPY to USD to your wife account. However if your wife's account is

THB, so we

will make remittance from JPY to THB account.

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Got the following email from Bangkok Bank, Tokyo branch- this looks like it might work, but no mention of costs... maybe the whole thing is free?:

1. Firstly, accourding to Japanese Law of Anti-Money Laundering, our

remittance policy requires customers to make the registeration of Foreign

remittance. (We can send the application form and guidline by mail if you

give us of your address in Japan.)

2. After we receive your complete of our Foreign remittace register

apllication with necessary attached copy of your identification card

such: Alien registration card, driver licence or Health insurance card.

However we can accept the application by only original mail.

3. For our reply is take around 5 business day to check the details and

send you of the registered number of applicant code number and guideline to

your address which same as mentioned on your identification with address

is in Japan.

4. The way of making remittance you can either come to Bangkok Bank, Tokyo

branch or domestice transfer to our Tokyo branch's account via ATM of

Japanese bank.

**However if you make domestic transfer, with in office hour at 15.00 of

the day to be accept. If you make domestic transfer after 15.00, your

remittance

will be process on the following day.

5. For the remittance currency, it is depended on currency of your wife

account

in Thailand if your wife holding USD account in Thailand, you can make

remittance

from JPY to USD to your wife account. However if your wife's account is

THB, so we

will make remittance from JPY to THB account.

That is new to me that BKK Bank will do retail. I was told they service companies only.

What is red, if you have that, than OK. ID card is Japanese ID card for foreigners. The DL and Health Ins Card are, I suspect, also Japan issued documents.

Edited by think_too_mut
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  • 2 weeks later...

Did it from my Japanese Citibank account (once I eventually got my gaijin card so I could open it), to a Bangkok Bank account with no problems. Seem to remember having to send in a paper form with the transfer details, then it becoming available on my internet banking service a few days later.

Rather surprised you cant just do a foreign transfer with Bank of America. (or is it like my bank in the UK where you need to set up the first transfer in person at a branch, but can then use phone or internet banking from then on.)

Biggest hassle was the period while I was waiting for my work visa to be issued, then waiting for my gaijin card, as I needed it to open the bank account. You can't transfer money out of the country until you get the card (tried the Bangkok Bank branch - ended up getting my father to transfer some money to my account in Thailand from the UK - just to cover the electricity/water etc. for the place here.).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Any lost soul to happen upon this lonely thread: know that for the last 4 weeks I've been to about 5 different banks trying to get this to work- nothing was practical and now I'm just reduced to having to ask a friend back in the US to do the transfer for me, once he opens an account at Bank of America and I transfer online to his account. Citibank, HSBC, Lloyd's, Bangkok Bank, Japanese banks, etc etc all have huge opening fees or take a week or more to open... not to mention probably won't speak english and will take up half your working day in total trying to figure stuff out.

If you absolutley must do it, you'd have to have the patience to first get a gaijin card or buy the official receipt (the actual card takes 3 weeks to arrive), then open a domestic japanese account at a japanese bank, SOMEHOW find a way to transfer from Bank of America to that account (let me tell you, that's not going to be easy) and THEN do the wire transfer through Lloyd's to Thailand. Yea verily, Western Union and it's tantalizing $200USD transfer fee, conveniently shut down in Japan this month ....just makes me wonder- what if this was a medical emergency and she needed the funds immediately??

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Any lost soul to happen upon this lonely thread: know that for the last 4 weeks I've been to about 5 different banks trying to get this to work- nothing was practical and now I'm just reduced to having to ask a friend back in the US to do the transfer for me, once he opens an account at Bank of America and I transfer online to his account. Citibank, HSBC, Lloyd's, Bangkok Bank, Japanese banks, etc etc all have huge opening fees or take a week or more to open... not to mention probably won't speak english and will take up half your working day in total trying to figure stuff out.

If you absolutley must do it, you'd have to have the patience to first get a gaijin card or buy the official receipt (the actual card takes 3 weeks to arrive), then open a domestic japanese account at a japanese bank, SOMEHOW find a way to transfer from Bank of America to that account (let me tell you, that's not going to be easy) and THEN do the wire transfer through Lloyd's to Thailand. Yea verily, Western Union and it's tantalizing $200USD transfer fee, conveniently shut down in Japan this month ....just makes me wonder- what if this was a medical emergency and she needed the funds immediately??

You need a US bank account that will allow you do wire (SWIFT) transfers without going to the bank. BofA is not one. Try First Internet Bank. They will let you do a SWIFT transfer with a fax request (I also use a e-mail confirmation). You can set up the bank account on the Internet as long as you have a bill or something that has your name and US address. I used my BofA bank statement printed from the Internet Banking.

Went through what you are going through several years ago while in another Asian country.

TH

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SOMEHOW find a way to transfer from Bank of America to that account (let me tell you, that's not going to be easy) and THEN do the wire transfer through Lloyd's to Thailand.

Lloyds account is like a local bank transfer, does not need to be registered with a Japanese bank. It's like paying rent or utilities.

From a Japanese bank to Lloyds is easy and only 420Y (4.30US$) for local transfer.

The thing is here: from Lloyds, the receiving end (Thai end) must be registered (apply first and wait 4-5 days) with Lloyds. Only then you can send the money. Their fee seems much lower, but it is only a bit lower as they have their own exchange rate and that's where they make their money.

Re English skills at Japanese banks: Citibank front people all speak English, many quite well, and are perfectly trained in forms and procedures.

No way something will not work at one branch and might work at another. Pretty much all staff at Japanese banks are trained to the level of robotic perfection. No way, as some reported happening in Bangkok, a smile and "look, honey, I am in rush" will make them even blink let alone bend the rules.

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It would seem what Sven is trying to do is transfer money from a US bank account to a Thailand bank account while in Japan. He shouldn't have to mess with a Japanese bank at all to do that.

Just out of curiosity, do Japanese banks allow someone to walk in with cash and no account and do a SWIFT transfer? That was one of the cool things about Malaysia, was you could do that, at least you could at May Bank. They had the forms at the counter and it was an ordinary transaction for them. Cannot remember the cost, but it was very reasonable.

TH

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It would seem what Sven is trying to do is transfer money from a US bank account to a Thailand bank account while in Japan. He shouldn't have to mess with a Japanese bank at all to do that.

If that's the case, he is just on Japanese soil and if he has bank accounts elsewhere it should not matter.

He either does not or his bank let him down.

Just out of curiosity, do Japanese banks allow someone to walk in with cash and no account and do a SWIFT transfer? That was one of the cool things about Malaysia, was you could do that, at least you could at May Bank. They had the forms at the counter and it was an ordinary transaction for them. Cannot remember the cost, but it was very reasonable.

TH

Impossible if the money goes outside of Japan. It got even stricter over last 5 years.

Just how strict they are: yesterday I sent money from Citibank to Bangkok Bank for yearly maintenance fees for my condo.

The invoice was in both mine and wife's name and I put them both in the form.

No, who is this person, she is not their customer, her name must not appear anywhere.

Edited by think_too_mut
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....No, who is this person, she is not their customer, her name must not appear anywhere.

You could have been in Thailand and got a response like that...

TH

It's rather anti money loundering law. She could have been Vladimir who bribed me to send a bag of money to his mafia boss and needed a proof he did it. In case something went wrong that could have save him from machine block around his ankles and right into the Moscow river.

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