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Long time farang in Samui


wasas

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Hi all, as the title says, Is there any farangs in Samui, that's been here more than 15, or 20 years or more, that's willing to say here on thaivisa, and tell us what it was like then and now,

I know one or two, that's been here but it's not my place to talk about them.

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The islander was further down the street near where Burger King is. When Dennis's lease came up for renewal the price skyrocketed so he built the new place. They were both in operation at the same time for a while and the current Islander was named Bamboo. Kurt, Dennis's brother, owned the Mexican restaurant and miniature golf course behind the Islander. When the lease ran out on the old place Dennis renamed Bamboo to Islander where it currently is located.

Cat Can Co and Faulty Towers both used to be on Soi Green Mango where my bar was located. Faulty moved out when I was still there and went to Boput and I hear that Cat Can Do has relocated to Bang Rak. I lived in the three story building behind SCB on the beach road. It was originally only two story and they finished the third story when I was staying there.

Like I said I could go on and on. What's funny is that I can't remember where I put my eyeglasses 5 minutes ago.

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If you want to know how Samui looked like way back, the Thai movie เกาะสวาทหาดสวรรค์ Paradise Island was shot here in 1969.

Unfortunately there are not so many scenes and nearly all are unrecognisable.

I'm not even quite sure that town center with the wooden houses are. There's even a brand new red song thiaw parked. Maybe the only one on the island at that time and the owner had to proudly show it off in the movie.

There's also a neat no-bra hula dance on the beach towards the end of the movie. It looks like the whole island has turned up to watch the dance performance, children and all watching the bouncing breasts.

Edited by Mole
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I came to stay on 29 March 1998. I had previously purchased a bar which was being run by my girlfriend, now wife of 14 years. I transferred a large amount of money here in January 1998 when the dollar topped at over 56/baht. The road through Chaweng beach was dirt and a real bog hole in rainy season. There were no malls and the closest Big C was in Surrithanni. McDonalds, Pizza Hutr/Company, and Burger King did not exist, but I think that Swensons was already there. The Islander wasn't where it is today, but Angela's in Maenam was there and made the only fresh bagels on the Island and I visited tit regularly. The only banks were in Nothon. The Raja ferry went from Donsak to Samui but the ferry that now leaves from Nathon was not Seatran and it went to Khanom. The cheapest place to stay near the beach in Chaweng was Charlie's Huts with a communal bathroom and cost about 100 baht/night. I

I could go on and on but when I built a house up north in early 2000 I spent less and less time there since I started raising Golden Retreivers. I finally sold my place in 2004 and left. My wife has been back a few times since and has told me how things have changed but I haven't been back since 2004.

I do miss the life there, especially the long walks on the beach with my mutts early every morning but with all of the changes I don't know if that would even be possible anymore.

That's a start, I'm sure that someone else will chime in.

And the beach road was two-way all along with no drainage whatsoever. There was a rickety bamboo bridge across the lake to reach Reggae Pub, I think Will Wait was where Khao San is now, but not 100%. There used to be another nightclub called Santa Fe further along Chaweng, and the Ark Bar was bamboo.

I also seem to remember a really nice open air bar called The Club just along from the Island Resort (which has just been demolished). I think it then moved to what is now Chaweng Stadium, and changed it's name to Solo Club. Long before Solo Bar.Can anyone confirm this?

The Island Resort was a really nice place to stay, with a cool little bar right on the beach. You could often even get an elephant ride on the beach at that time.

There was a restaurant called Do Drop Inn where one could sit outside on the grass with those Thai triangle cushions opposite SCB. There is a Haagen Daas there now.

Also (I don't know if you still can), you used to be able to buy a bottle of spirits in Green Mango Club, and leave it with your name on it for the next night.

Edited by phetphet
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First set foot here in 1986/7. Totally unrecognizable now and today people call it a paradise island? Paradise lost maybe ..

cheesy.gifcheesy.gifcheesy.gif

yeah, most of these people then are gone, because of that transformation. And others came because of that transformation. How many Farangs, who are here now long time, go to the beaches and into the forests? regularly, because they enjoy tropical nature on a tropical island. I would say less than 10%, maybe 1-5%. Maybe more than 60% never do that. Know a Farang for years, and she said once: boahh, have been at the beach 3 weeks ago and had to make pictures, what a fantastic sunset it was...... I said: that sunset is every day

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On the other side of the spectrum are younger generation newcomers like me who has never ever known how it used to be, but would rather very much prefer that Tesco is here as well as stable electricity and broadband internet, paved road, airport, catamaran, I could go on and on...

I don't want to offend anyone, but another reason you old people who are bickering about the good old days will also not be around on this world anymore. While newer generation will continue on with progress and development of the island (and the rest of the planet for that matter).

For us, it's not "good old days" but good days every day right now and better days ahead tomorrow.

Paradise lost? For you perhaps, but don't you worry, you'll get there soon enough.

But for the farang who decided to move and settle down here yesterday, this place right now is their paradise and that includes all the modern amenities.

Sorry, did you say "stable electricity!!" laugh.png

Aside of that, yes there are loads of modern amenities but sadly, like almost everything made here, its really crap quality that never lasts very long.

It would be far more appealing seeing all this "progress" if was was done professionally and in good quality rather than in the cheap shoddy third world manner in which everything seems to be done. Basically, if you are going to take way the natural environment and replace it with buildings then atleast do it properly

Edited by carmine
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On the other side of the spectrum are younger generation newcomers like me who has never ever known how it used to be, but would rather very much prefer that Tesco is here as well as stable electricity and broadband internet, paved road, airport, catamaran, I could go on and on...

I don't want to offend anyone, but another reason you old people who are bickering about the good old days will also not be around on this world anymore. While newer generation will continue on with progress and development of the island (and the rest of the planet for that matter).

For us, it's not "good old days" but good days every day right now and better days ahead tomorrow.

Paradise lost? For you perhaps, but don't you worry, you'll get there soon enough.

But for the farang who decided to move and settle down here yesterday, this place right now is their paradise and that includes all the modern amenities.

Sorry, did you say "stable electricity!!" laugh.png

Aside of that, yes there are loads of modern amenities but sadly, like almost everything made here, its really crap quality that never lasts very long.

It would be far more appealing seeing all this "progress" if was was done professionally and in good quality rather than in the cheap shoddy third world manner in which everything seems to be done. Basically, if you are going to take way the natural environment and replace it with buildings then atleast do it properly

I thought this thread was for 15 years plus?

Edited by notmyself
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The islander was further down the street near where Burger King is. When Dennis's lease came up for renewal the price skyrocketed so he built the new place. They were both in operation at the same time for a while and the current Islander was named Bamboo. Kurt, Dennis's brother, owned the Mexican restaurant and miniature golf course behind the Islander. When the lease ran out on the old place Dennis renamed Bamboo to Islander where it currently is located.

Cat Can Co and Faulty Towers both used to be on Soi Green Mango where my bar was located. Faulty moved out when I was still there and went to Boput and I hear that Cat Can Do has relocated to Bang Rak. I lived in the three story building behind SCB on the beach road. It was originally only two story and they finished the third story when I was staying there.

Like I said I could go on and on. What's funny is that I can't remember where I put my eyeglasses 5 minutes ago.

Rings a bell. smile.png

One thing that I miss, is hitching a lift. People would stop to pick you up...wherever, whenever. It was a much friendlier place. But with the new kind of tourist, came the new kind of 'service'. I even remember trying to walk around the island via the beaches...without even a bottle of water. Clambering over rocks. Gave up on that idea, emerged from the beach and on to the dirt road, sweating and shirtless. Put my hand out, someone stopped and gave me a lift back to Chaweng. Again, when I was stuck in Nathon at night. Saw a woman getting into her pickup at the police station. Asked her for a lift and she took me back to Chaweng. There are still some lovely people on Samui....even now.

The owner of Will Wait, which at the time was where Chaweng Khaosan sits now, literally ran after my Taxi when I was leaving, to present me with some pastries. The current owners of Chaweng Khaosan. Also lovely, gentle people.

I've forgotten more than I remember. There was a bar around where the Pizza Hut stands now(I think at the head of Coconut), but I cannot remember the name of it. The woman that lived in the house close to the beach had chickens running around. They would wake you up early in the morning. smile.png

I was even offered an opportunity to buy in to the new Ark Bar.... for not a lot.

I really didn't mind the lack of facilities. It kept the island and the people down to earth. They lived their lives and we lived amongst them.

Now it just seems all about commerce. It's still an amazing place.

Edited by Jiu-Jitsu
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I hitched hiked during my teeny years all over Europe, I slept everywhere unthinkable during that time in an old sleeping bag, and I would be the first one to give others a lift. But in Thailand especially on Samui, where many people know you, it can be very dangerous, if a taxi driver sees you or knows about that.

.

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I hitched hiked during my teeny years all over Europe, I slept everywhere unthinkable during that time in an old sleeping bag, and I would be the first one to give others a lift. But in Thailand especially on Samui, where many people know you, it can be very dangerous, if a taxi driver sees you or knows about that.

.

Please explain.
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I hitched hiked during my teeny years all over Europe, I slept everywhere unthinkable during that time in an old sleeping bag, and I would be the first one to give others a lift. But in Thailand especially on Samui, where many people know you, it can be very dangerous, if a taxi driver sees you or knows about that.

.

As I wrote...it was completely different then.

It would be both locals and visitors who would pick you up without question.

For me the island really started to go downhill around '98, when a couple of young lads approached me and announced how wonderful the place was as you could get 'birds' and keep them all night for a Tenner. That was the beginning of the change from the backpacker culture to the yob and snob culture.

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