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Refused Entry Yesterday at the Border, If I fly in Would I get the 30 days?


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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

Thank you Unbonjoe. So if I have $1000 USD I should be ok, Yesterday was a bit of a shock as I had never had issues before and had always either arrived by plane or got a tourist Visa in Laos. I had not even been back in Thailand for about 16 Months so thought I would be ok crossing the border, Lesson learned, again thank you for a quick response, I will get the flight booked now

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Poi Pet is not the friendliest crossing to use. They have a history to turning people away for no good reason.

One thousand dollars would certainly be enough to satisfy them.

With your history I don't think you will even be questioned when you enter at the airport.

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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

I always thought entry into Thailand was technically at the immigrants discretion Joe, but if you have the right credentials then they cannot refuse you?

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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

I always thought entry into Thailand was technically at the immigrants discretion Joe, but if you have the right credentials then they cannot refuse you?

The reasons for denial of entry are written in section 12 of the immigration act. It is not at the discretion of the officer. A denial of entry stamp mentions section 12 and the clause or clauses used.

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Attitudes by border guards vary, up and down. Currently, it's at a down nadir, mostly because of the paranoid junta. Recently, when entering Thailand from Burma at a land crossing (Tachilek) the Thai official told me I needed to get a new passport or he wouldn't let me enter next time. (I cross often, and have a multi-entry). I didn't argue, as that can never do any good. However, I still have over 30 blank pages in my passport. Even so, I made the 7 hr. trip and paid nearly $200 to get a new passport.

That's the thing about Thai bureaucracy. Not only is it subjective (if you're with a respectable-looking, rich Thai, you get better service), but there is no recourse for a farang if he feels cheated and/or treated unfairly.

Another recent story: An American friend of mine had a problem with his 90 day reporting. He called me up (I was again vacationing in Burma) alarmed. I cut short my Burma trip, rushed back to thailand (2 hrs traveling) and accompanied him to the Thai Imm office. This time he got lucky, and got a different official to look at his papers. She smiled and said all was fine. ....just added proof, if any were needed, of the subjectivity of Thai Imm. Problematic.

Would love to have you as a friend. Imagine, cutting short an overseas vacation to rush back home so you can accompany a friend to immigration to resolve a 90-day reporting issue. You are probably one in a million.

A two hours Myanmar/Thailand bordertrip is hardly cutting short an overseas travel. But still ok tough to help a friend with his 90 day reporting problems.

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It is really like a lottery with Thai immigration,although at some border crossing your odds are better than at others.For example Had Lek I consider much better than Poipet,Ban Laem and Pakard also on the 'safer side'.That said at any point ,you catch an officer in lousy mood,maybe just chewed out by his wife or mia noi,he might take it out on a farang.

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Attitudes by border guards vary, up and down. Currently, it's at a down nadir, mostly because of the paranoid junta. Recently, when entering Thailand from Burma at a land crossing (Tachilek) the Thai official told me I needed to get a new passport or he wouldn't let me enter next time. (I cross often, and have a multi-entry). I didn't argue, as that can never do any good. However, I still have over 30 blank pages in my passport. Even so, I made the 7 hr. trip and paid nearly $200 to get a new passport.

That's the thing about Thai bureaucracy. Not only is it subjective (if you're with a respectable-looking, rich Thai, you get better service), but there is no recourse for a farang if he feels cheated and/or treated unfairly.

Another recent story: An American friend of mine had a problem with his 90 day reporting. He called me up (I was again vacationing in Burma) alarmed. I cut short my Burma trip, rushed back to thailand (2 hrs traveling) and accompanied him to the Thai Imm office. This time he got lucky, and got a different official to look at his papers. She smiled and said all was fine. ....just added proof, if any were needed, of the subjectivity of Thai Imm. Problematic.

I recently crossed on a day trip to Myawady, no problems whatsoever, no questions either. Am on a multi entry too. There were a couple of questions about the car I was driving across (more on the Myanmar side) but both the Thai and Myanmar sides obliged without issues. Very friendly bunch on both sides of the border, Thai side more smiley and talkative, Myanmar side wanted to make sure I wouldn't drive outside of the permitted area (of course I had no plans to).

Helps a lot if you speak Thai [fluenty] like I do. I am not sure I would have been comfortable doing a border run to Myanmar with my car if I couldn't speak Thai. I'm almost certain the last foreigner to cross here by car, that didn't go on a tour was me, last year. None of the officials seem to remember that though as they all seemed to be different to the past, apart from one immigration guy I recognized from previous visits.

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Attitudes by border guards vary, up and down. Currently, it's at a down nadir, mostly because of the paranoid junta. Recently, when entering Thailand from Burma at a land crossing (Tachilek) the Thai official told me I needed to get a new passport or he wouldn't let me enter next time. (I cross often, and have a multi-entry). I didn't argue, as that can never do any good. However, I still have over 30 blank pages in my passport. Even so, I made the 7 hr. trip and paid nearly $200 to get a new passport.

That's the thing about Thai bureaucracy. Not only is it subjective (if you're with a respectable-looking, rich Thai, you get better service), but there is no recourse for a farang if he feels cheated and/or treated unfairly.

Another recent story: An American friend of mine had a problem with his 90 day reporting. He called me up (I was again vacationing in Burma) alarmed. I cut short my Burma trip, rushed back to thailand (2 hrs traveling) and accompanied him to the Thai Imm office. This time he got lucky, and got a different official to look at his papers. She smiled and said all was fine. ....just added proof, if any were needed, of the subjectivity of Thai Imm. Problematic.

Would love to have you as a friend. Imagine, cutting short an overseas vacation to rush back home so you can accompany a friend to immigration to resolve a 90-day reporting issue. You are probably one in a million.

Real friends to that. Maybe you just have drinking mates or acquaintances...

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Very few, if any, are actually refused entry.

More common is to be taken aside to be questioned as to the means to support yourself during your stay in Thailand

The computers are now set to "flag" travelers with more or close to an unspecified number of visa exempt entries

No one can be truly sure how you be treated at immigration.

But to be honest, flying in is more usually more successful than crossing a Land Border.

Especially in my case, as I travel in a wheelchair (because of my age and an old leg injury)

It does make a difference sometimes.

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Very few, if any, are actually refused entry.

More common is to be taken aside to be questioned as to the means to support yourself during your stay in Thailand

The computers are now set to "flag" travelers with more or close to an unspecified number of visa exempt entries

No one can be truly sure how you be treated at immigration.

But to be honest, flying in is more usually more successful than crossing a Land Border.

Especially in my case, as I travel in a wheelchair (because of my age and an old leg injury)

It does make a difference sometimes.

I rarely hear of problems of legitimate travelers who come back to Thailand by land, who have spent some time in the neighboring country (this means at least one night but usually longer). Certainly someone who doesn't spend more than a few days in Thailand before heading to another country then coming back hasn't got much to worry about.

One issue at an airport that you don't have at a land border is that you can be put on a plane back to your home country (or country of residence). At a land border, you simply walk/catch a bus back to the country you arrived from.

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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

I always thought entry into Thailand was technically at the immigrants discretion Joe, but if you have the right credentials then they cannot refuse you?

The reasons for denial of entry are written in section 12 of the immigration act. It is not at the discretion of the officer. A denial of entry stamp mentions section 12 and the clause or clauses used.

Not at the discretion of the IO? So the checkpoints in the south that are notorious for their denial rates just happen to be where all the Section 12 violators always choose to turn up? Section 12 is the pretext of choice for these denials, granted. But who's the judge, jury and executioner? Does application of the Section 12 "criteria" really have to amount to anything more than a "suspicion" on the part of the IO?

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You may be taken to the side at an airport and be questioned about what you are doing here. Just be prepared to show financial proof if asked for it. The best amount to have is the equivalent of 20k baht in cash. They can only deny entry if you cannot meet the requirements of section 12 of the immigration act.

I always thought entry into Thailand was technically at the immigrants discretion Joe, but if you have the right credentials then they cannot refuse you?

The reasons for denial of entry are written in section 12 of the immigration act. It is not at the discretion of the officer. A denial of entry stamp mentions section 12 and the clause or clauses used.

Not at the discretion of the IO? So the checkpoints in the south that are notorious for their denial rates just happen to be where all the Section 12 violators always choose to turn up? Section 12 is the pretext of choice for these denials, granted. But who's the judge, jury and executioner? Does application of the Section 12 "criteria" really have to amount to anything more than a "suspicion" on the part of the IO?

A denial means a stamp in the passport.

Those people are not officially denied entry.

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It is really like a lottery with Thai immigration,although at some border crossing your odds are better than at others.For example Had Lek I consider much better than Poipet,Ban Laem and Pakard also on the 'safer side'.That said at any point ,you catch an officer in lousy mood,maybe just chewed out by his wife or mia noi,he might take it out on a farang.

You can say that again, I did a border run a couple of months ago to Ban Laem, and the IO was checking my ME Non-O (married to a Thai) and even questioning If I really was married. I then showed him a copy of our Marriage certificate and he grunted and stamped me in. And just in case I also had the receipt from the Thai Consulate for the Visa with me. He was in a bad mood that day as a couple of border runners in our Minibus were complaining, but nobody got refused.

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It is really like a lottery with Thai immigration,although at some border crossing your odds are better than at others.For example Had Lek I consider much better than Poipet,Ban Laem and Pakard also on the 'safer side'.That said at any point ,you catch an officer in lousy mood,maybe just chewed out by his wife or mia noi,he might take it out on a farang.

You can say that again, I did a border run a couple of months ago to Ban Laem, and the IO was checking my ME Non-O (married to a Thai) and even questioning If I really was married. I then showed him a copy of our Marriage certificate and he grunted and stamped me in. And just in case I also had the receipt from the Thai Consulate for the Visa with me. He was in a bad mood that day as a couple of border runners in our Minibus were complaining, but nobody got refused.

Ban Laem. Did a border run there in 2014, my third consecutive one (and also my last) just after I finished my job and my non-B ended. I then got myself a double entry TR from Vientiane in the meantime, and later that year I would be back on a non-B. Anyway, at the time, the I/O was busy listening to something (or someone) using the earphones of her iPhone and had no problems stamping me in for an additional 15 days. I had gone over to the Cambodian side earlier that day - maybe the fact I had a 1-year Cambodian business visa helped, but I suspect they neither looked for nor cared for that.

I don't think I would carry my marriage certificate with me but it's good you did.

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<snip>

I don't think I would carry my marriage certificate with me but it's good you did.

When I travel outside of Thailand, I always have a plastic folder with (at least ) the following with me

- copy marriage certificate

- copy Yellow House book

- copy id card wife

- copy Wife's house book

- copy passport

- copy latest Thai Visa

- copy latest Entry to Thailand

- original payment receipt of latest Visa

It doesn't take much space and doesn't weigh much, but it helps and I think it's better to come prepared, and all the time we travel, I only needed it once at that Ban Laem Border.

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<snip>

I don't think I would carry my marriage certificate with me but it's good you did.

When I travel outside of Thailand, I always have a plastic folder with (at least ) the following with me

- copy marriage certificate

- copy Yellow House book

- copy id card wife

- copy Wife's house book

- copy passport

- copy latest Thai Visa

- copy latest Entry to Thailand

- original payment receipt of latest Visa

It doesn't take much space and doesn't weigh much, but it helps and I think it's better to come prepared, and all the time we travel, I only needed it once at that Ban Laem Border.

I always took, take the youngest son who I have with me

and who has a Thai Passport , until now nobody wanted to change diapers and have to take care and let us in together. wink.png

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<snip>

I don't think I would carry my marriage certificate with me but it's good you did.

When I travel outside of Thailand, I always have a plastic folder with (at least ) the following with me

- copy marriage certificate

- copy Yellow House book

- copy id card wife

- copy Wife's house book

- copy passport

- copy latest Thai Visa

- copy latest Entry to Thailand

- original payment receipt of latest Visa

It doesn't take much space and doesn't weigh much, but it helps and I think it's better to come prepared, and all the time we travel, I only needed it once at that Ban Laem Border.

I always took, take the youngest son who I have with me

and who has a Thai Passport , until now nobody wanted to change diapers and have to take care and let us in together. wink.png

Unfortunately we don't have kids ;) [emoji9]

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<snip>

I don't think I would carry my marriage certificate with me but it's good you did.

When I travel outside of Thailand, I always have a plastic folder with (at least ) the following with me

- copy marriage certificate

- copy Yellow House book

- copy id card wife

- copy Wife's house book

- copy passport

- copy latest Thai Visa

- copy latest Entry to Thailand

- original payment receipt of latest Visa

It doesn't take much space and doesn't weigh much, but it helps and I think it's better to come prepared, and all the time we travel, I only needed it once at that Ban Laem Border.

I always took, take the youngest son who I have with me

and who has a Thai Passport , until now nobody wanted to change diapers and have to take care and let us in together. wink.png

Unfortunately we don't have kids wink.png [emoji9]

Keep trying, if you like to have? Never give up - today, there are many ways to get thumbsup.gif

I have too many, here the youngest with pretty wife from Cousin. biggrin.png

13501585_1093608880677403_3304423902885413006675_1052953321409626_74084170483638

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A denial means a stamp in the passport.

Those people are not officially denied entry.

You're just splitting a technical hair. If you've been turned back, with or without a stamp, you have, for all practical purposes, obviously been denied entry.

Edited by ubonjoe
fixed quoting error by removing the excess and uneeded quotes only 4 are allowed
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A denial means a stamp in the passport.

Those people are not officially denied entry.

You're just splitting a technical hair. If you've been turned back, with or without a stamp, you have, for all practical purposes, obviously been denied entry.

No stamp means proper procedures were not followed which means that section 12 has to be the basis for denial of entry.

If procedures were followed there would be less denials at border crossings.

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A denial means a stamp in the passport.

Those people are not officially denied entry.

You're just splitting a technical hair. If you've been turned back, with or without a stamp, you have, for all practical purposes, obviously been denied entry.

No stamp means proper procedures were not followed which means that section 12 has to be the basis for denial of entry.

If procedures were followed there would be less denials at border crossings.

Yes! And up jumped the devil.

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A denial means a stamp in the passport.

Those people are not officially denied entry.

You're just splitting a technical hair. If you've been turned back, with or without a stamp, you have, for all practical purposes, obviously been denied entry.

For the people involved the difference is very significant.
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