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The better wine Cedar or casltle Creek


Mojomor

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No, no, this is the one! Just found it last week in Makro.
It is a fruit wine mix ( yes and I know fruit wine mixed contain: battery acid, used condom ingredients, gunpowder, tampon juice etc.), but still tastes great. My vote 1 over the others.

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I think Cedar Creek (especially the white, although sells out quickly in Makro) far superior to Castle Creek and Brookford is just awful. Just goes to show we all have different tastes. I sometimes make a spritzer/sangria concoction with soda water etc to fool myself into believing that all of them are palatable. Mont Clair is bad as well. 

 

You can generally tell which are the worst by how much stock of each Makro have!

Edited by Classic Ray
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I'm not familiar with either of these offerings. I prefer the  gentler palette of a well rounded Merlot or the white hit'n run Jacob's Creek but my all time favourite is a wine from Turkey called Kavaklidere which is sadly not available here. 

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Unfortunately, use peoples who don't like Brookford, may have had your taste buds spoilt by infections of the gums and lips by consuming too much of that other liquid emanating from gram 4 positive folding rose petals.

 

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2 minutes ago, Tony45 said:

Peter Vella 4 litre red is quite good if you cannot find a good Australian shiraz.

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Surely, if you couldn't find a good Australian Shiraz you would find a reasonable equivalent, rather than the cask wines with fruit juice added?

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4 hours ago, Muhendis said:

I'm not familiar with either of these offerings. I prefer the  gentler palette of a well rounded Merlot or the white hit'n run Jacob's Creek but my all time favourite is a wine from Turkey called Kavaklidere which is sadly not available here. 

Obviously you never lived in France.

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4 hours ago, carlyai said:

Unfortunately, use peoples who don't like Brookford, may have had your taste buds spoilt by infections of the gums and lips by consuming too much of that other liquid emanating from gram 4 positive folding rose petals.

 

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More bullshit.

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2 hours ago, Muhendis said:

but they keep the best for themselves.

Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on that point, because the best producers in France rely on exports in order to keep them profitable. Sure every producer has his own personal stock of his fine wine not only for his family but for sale later on if needs be.

 

The fine wines of Bordeaux are exported all round the world and the main markets being China, USA and Britain and even though 40% of all Bordeaux wine is exported, much of the fine wine is exported and the now well-established trade in Bordeaux wines selling "en primeur" bears witness to this.

 

Burgundy has to do the same with its fine wines even though the countries of the EU seem have taken a liking to the wines of Bourgogne with the likes of Belgium holding quite a prominent position in the export stakes. There again the UK and the USA remain important markets as does Japan and I remember being in Japan after they'd been in a frenzied buying mode for the wines of Burgundy, only to suffer some financial setbacks and the wine shops in the main airport terminal in Tokyo were absolutely full of cases of Burgundy at discounted prices.

 

For the record, much of the cheaper wine is actually consumed in France and in days gone by the practice of shipping the rough stuff over to various markets ensured that France got a bit of "bad press" about the quality of its wines and to a great extent that has now ceased.

 

Just to prove me wrong on this last point, I have noticed some casks of French wines finding their way into these markets here and these, like many of the other cheaper offerings here, are mixed with fruit juice. Possibly finding new markets for the rough stuff?

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6 hours ago, bazza73 said:

I understand in Australia both the OP's choices are referred to as "2 buck chuck".

This may be the case, however I believe the term originated in the USA and was applied to such prestigious (read crap) wines as "Boones Farm" and other offerings even lower down the scale than those of the early "Ernst and Julio Gallo" efforts.

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19 hours ago, Muhendis said:

I'm not familiar with either of these offerings. I prefer the  gentler palette of a well rounded Merlot or the white hit'n run Jacob's Creek but my all time favourite is a wine from Turkey called Kavaklidere which is sadly not available here. 

 

personally i think if you are going to drop pretentious term like palate when discussing wine, you should at least spell it correctly.

 

and just for informative purposes, your palate is your sense of taste and ability to discern flavour, wine doesnt have either a palate or a palette.



 

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2 hours ago, xylophone said:

This may be the case, however I believe the term originated in the USA and was applied to such prestigious (read crap) wines as "Boones Farm" and other offerings even lower down the scale than those of the early "Ernst and Julio Gallo" efforts.

Trader Joe's offered their own brand of "good" white

and red everyday table wines for $2 per bottle.  Known

as 2 Buck Shaw....probably 20+ years ago!

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22 hours ago, HooHaa said:

 

personally i think if you are going to drop pretentious term like palate when discussing wine, you should at least spell it correctly.

 

and just for informative purposes, your palate is your sense of taste and ability to discern flavour, wine doesnt have either a palate or a palette.



 

Thank you for your observations and for correcting my spelling.

 

Now.

 

Do you actually have anything to say about the topic?

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Now now people... settle down please.

:wai:

Please discuss the topic matter not each other.

 

Oh, and grammar (or spelling) police comments aren't welcome either... they contribute nothing positive at all.

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2 hours ago, Tony45 said:


I guess I try to strike a balance between quality and cost for the everyday glass of red.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

I understand where you're coming from and I wasn't being dismissive of your post, and what I was trying to say was that if you were looking for a good Aussie Shiraz, then they would certainly be up in the 600 baht plus range, whereas there are some for under 500 baht (Gossips for example) and although not stunning, are good everyday drinkers.

 

Some of the South American offerings these days can come in at around 450 baht a bottle and are worth trying. However if you are just drinking the odd glass of wine every day, then cask wines can fit the bill, my pick being Berri Estates.

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On 4/22/2017 at 8:52 AM, Tony45 said:


I guess I try to strike a balance between quality and cost for the everyday glass of red.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

Had another thought Tony.........Tesco sell a range of Aussie wines under the "Vineyards world wines" label, priced around 349 baht a bottle and it is an ok drinker.

 

Don't ask me how they price it so low as not sure about that, but it doesn't seem to contain fruit juice.

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The issue, of course is price. For many working expats that may not be important but for the many retired people in Thailand we have to budget for the month. When a real wine that i can buy for 5-6 GBP a bottle in the UK costs 12+ GBP in Thailand, and may be of variable quality due to improper storage in Thailand, you are reluctant to pay that much for it. The fruit wines in Thailand can pass for table wine and cost about 4 GBP per bottle (although usually you have to buy larger bottles or a box to get that price). Not keen on the whites but have found the Castle/Cedar Creek red wine OK, and can buy in 2 litre bottles which will last me about 10 days.

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