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Academic suggests terracing method for water management in Central Plain


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Academic suggests terracing method for water management in Central Plain

 

BANGKOK, 24 April 2017 (NNT) - Director of the Hydro and Agro Informatics Institute Royol Chitradon has suggested the government manage rice cultivation in the central region with the terracing method in order to save more water. 

Mr. Royal said water management by the Royal Irrigation Department this year was better. However, the average water level of the Bhumibol Dam was very low and it would take three years until the water level was considered normal, said the director. 

Mr. Royal added that water should be stored in farmers' land and downplayed dam construction. 

As for the terracing method, the director said it was suitable for the central region, particularly the areas surrounding Ayutthaya and Suphan Buri provinces.

 
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-- nnt 2017-04-24
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7 minutes ago, ratcatcher said:

I was always under the impression that terracing was used where the terrain was hilly or mountainous. Do sSuphanburi and ayuttaya fit those descriptions?

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=terracing+for+rice+cultivation&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiVpdvw4rvTAhXFO48KHe_zDRsQ_AUIBigB&biw=1366&bih=638

Do not ask difficult questions and you should also  be aware that Thailand is the hub of terracing. 

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44 minutes ago, canuckamuck said:

All that is needed is to bring in some hills and then terrace them.

...

Exactly, :cheesy:, shouldn't be a problem then, sounds like a fairly practical approach ...

Well >academic< says it about all, especially in connection with this here place ... 

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30 minutes ago, NCC1701A said:

after watching them install storm drains in the street in front of my house, I can tell you Thais are not on the same page as to which way water flows.

Correct, my quick description of Thailand sum's it up with "the floor drain must always be located at the highest point" 

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Visit the Phra Ram IX area in Bangkok when it rains. Although this is brand new and slated to be the new CBD for Bangkok, the roads are awash with puddles where the tarmac has not been laid properly, the drains are ineffective and the footways have the same unevenness and broken surfaces as everywhere else older in the city. The surrounding khlongs are filthy and smelly 

 

The front entrances to the buildings have lovely steps and foyers, as this shows face. But there are few ramps for wheelchairs and pushchairs, and those there are are steeply angled. Come up from the MRT station escalator outside Robinsons store and there are only steps down followed by steps up to the front of the store. The footpaths are still obstructed with utility posts and advertising hoardings, have motorcyclists driving on them, and are not designed to protect pedestrians by separating them from the traffic.

 

Until some common sense and thoughtful design and construction is undertaken in Thailand, it will continue to flood, have congested roads and cities, and remain firmly in the third world.

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13 minutes ago, Classic Ray said:

Visit the Phra Ram IX area in Bangkok when it rains. Although this is brand new and slated to be the new CBD for Bangkok, the roads are awash with puddles where the tarmac has not been laid properly, the drains are ineffective and the footways have the same unevenness and broken surfaces as everywhere else older in the city. The surrounding khlongs are filthy and smelly 

 

The front entrances to the buildings have lovely steps and foyers, as this shows face. But there are few ramps for wheelchairs and pushchairs, and those there are are steeply angled. Come up from the MRT station escalator outside Robinsons store and there are only steps down followed by steps up to the front of the store. The footpaths are still obstructed with utility posts and advertising hoardings, have motorcyclists driving on them, and are not designed to protect pedestrians by separating them from the traffic.

 

Until some common sense and thoughtful design and construction is undertaken in Thailand, it will continue to flood, have congested roads and cities, and remain firmly in the third world.

It's way off topic, but correct. 

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