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UN road safety week focuses on dangers of driving at high speed


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UN road safety week focuses on dangers of driving at high speed

By The Nation

 

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The United Nations is organising the fourth UN Global Road Safety Week from May 8-14, focusing on speed and what can be done to address this key risk factor in road traffic deaths and injuries.

 

The United Nations Road Safety Collaboration is organising the event under the slogan “Save Lives #Slowdown”.

 

Hundreds of events are being organised across the world to highlight the dangers of excessive and inappropriate speed and to promote solutions for managing speed, a major cause of road traffic death and injury. 

 

A key component of the week’s initiatives at the local level are “Slow Down Days”, during which activities are being organised for the public on the streets of towns and cities as a way of promoting safer speeds.

 

Thailand joined the campaign by hosting a road safety event at the United Nations Building in Bangkok on May 7. Nikorn Chamnong, a member of the National Reform Steering Assembly, made the case for road safety at a Cabinet meeting on May 9 by sharing the “Manifesto to make roads safe: Priorities for road safety policy and legislation 2020 and beyond”.

 

In addition, the World Health Organisation (WHO) Country Office for Thailand, in collaboration with the Ministry of Transport and other key partnes, launched the speed setting guideline as part of an effort to promote road safety on May 10. The guideline was commissioned by WHO with support from the Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety. It aims to enable the country to set proper speed limits in provinces. Speed was part of the amendment package endorsed by the Cabinet on October 4, 2016. The launch of this guideline is expected to help the endorsed amendment to materialise.

 

According to WHO, speed contributes to around one-third of all fatal road traffic crashes in high-income countries, and up to half in low- and middle-income countries. The UN Global Road Safety Week seeks to increase understanding of the dangers of speed and generate action on measures to address speed, thereby saving lives on the roads.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/breakingnews/30314809

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-5-10
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Anything and I do mean anything, they can do to reduce crazy driving speeds, accidents and death here are very welcome.

Good luck with implementing it though. Way too many amulets and dashboard statues making the uneducated feel safe whatever lunatic speeds they drive at.

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6 minutes ago, wirat69 said:

Get the vans, Fortuners and other slow coaches out of the right hand lane and the problem will be dramatically reduced!!!

Yes exactly  & then you have the ones that that want to overtake & end up nowhere due to traffic but then decide to try & squeeze in doing a 100 km hr forcing you to brake 

I'm in Thailand at the moment so what is the UN

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According to WHO, speed contributes to around one-third of all fatal road traffic crashes in high-income countries, and up to half in low- and middle-income countries.

 

And where is Thailand belong to?. I think low income countries? So the percentage of fatal accidents is more than half"?

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Speeding?!  Really?  The UN is concerning itself with speeders??!!   Why sure, why not?  It's not like there are any ongoing threats to regional stability or world peace, or systematic atrocities taking place anywhere to be concerned about. And while we're at it, perhaps we could have a world week to address the global scourge of jaywalking.

 

WAY past time to cancel that lease in NYC, as well as a few dip. visas ...

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