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Bringing physical gold to Thailand


pikao

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I’m not sure, but I think so. It’s not like India.

Should be able to bring US$20K in without declaring.

Again I’m not sure, anyone else?

I know Kitco will ship ship here and I have carried ~$10K in.

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Gold is considered to be a “monetary instrument” by the US. The CBP website doesn’t explicitly say if it is value by weight or face value (such as a 1oz gold buffalo with a “face value” of $50) but it does refer to instruments valued over $10,000.  This has been discussed on the Kitco forums but there has never been a consensus reached (see TGFAFs post after mine as he confirms what my personal opinion was) I personally suspect that it would be by the weight value and a 1oz coin would be “valued” at the market price.  I can’t really see them allowing someone to leave the country with 200 gold buffalos or 500 1 oz St. Gaudins declaring them at $10,000 value.  If you’re bringing in gold bars with no “face value” such as Pamp Suisse, Credit Suisse etc, then obviously it would be by weight.  I suspect, but don’t know for sure how Thailand looks at the situation.

 

Here are a couple links that may help clarify it for you (or not).

 

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/332/~/currency-%2F-monetary-instruments---definition-of-negotiable-monetary

 

http://preciousmetaltax.com/transporting-metals-internationally/

 

FWIW, I always travel with an ounce or two of bullion, and even when questioned about it, my statement is that I use it as insurance if there is ever a “currency crisis” when I am abroad, which has been acceptable to every customs officer to ask about it although I have only been questioned in the US and Korea.

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Airalee said:

Gold is considered to be a “monetary instrument” by the US. The CBP website doesn’t explicitly say if it is value by weight or face value (such as a 1oz gold buffalo with a “face value” of $50) but it does refer to instruments valued over $10,000.  This has been discussed on the Kitco forums but here has never been a consensus reached.  

 

 

Well, actually there has been a consensus. When gold was shooting up in price 8-10 years ago there have been plenty of reports from people being parted from their gold by a border agency because they were declaring it at a face value.

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4 minutes ago, theguyfromanotherforum said:

 

Well, actually there has been a consensus. When gold was shooting up in price 8-10 years ago there have been plenty of reports from people being parted from their gold by a border agency because they were declaring it at a face value.

That’s what I suspected.  The forum discussions I was referring to were back in 2005 when gold was still in the $400s

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If you buy over $10 in the US it is reported.

I do not believe you have to declare anything when you leave the US, but you do when you come back if the aggregate is over $10K

The total is $20k in Thailand, yes?

I would not carry any gold bullion or excess jewelry into India.

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Thai gold is a different gold percentage to the bullion sold elsewhere, which is 99.99%. I'm curious as to why the OP wants to bring gold in, because it's like coals to Newcastle, given it is freely available here.

My best guess is one has to declare any amount > 20,000 USD.

 

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8 hours ago, Airalee said:

Gold is considered to be a “monetary instrument” by the US. The CBP website doesn’t explicitly say if it is value by weight or face value (such as a 1oz gold buffalo with a “face value” of $50) but it does refer to instruments valued over $10,000.  This has been discussed on the Kitco forums but there has never been a consensus reached (see TGFAFs post after mine as he confirms what my personal opinion was) I personally suspect that it would be by the weight value and a 1oz coin would be “valued” at the market price.  I can’t really see them allowing someone to leave the country with 200 gold buffalos or 500 1 oz St. Gaudins declaring them at $10,000 value.  If you’re bringing in gold bars with no “face value” such as Pamp Suisse, Credit Suisse etc, then obviously it would be by weight.  I suspect, but don’t know for sure how Thailand looks at the situation.

 

Here are a couple links that may help clarify it for you (or not).

 

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/332/~/currency-%2F-monetary-instruments---definition-of-negotiable-monetary

 

http://preciousmetaltax.com/transporting-metals-internationally/

 

FWIW, I always travel with an ounce or two of bullion, and even when questioned about it, my statement is that I use it as insurance if there is ever a “currency crisis” when I am abroad, which has been acceptable to every customs officer to ask about it although I have only been questioned in the US and Korea.

 

 

 

This is a disturbing and nauseatingly disgusting habit of Americans. 

 

Someone asks about bringing gold to Thailand and the response is "Gold is considered to be a “monetary instrument” by the US". It's as if they consider every country beyond American borders a geographic extension of the United States. Why mention US customs laws when the question is specifically related to bringing gold to THAILAND!

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, mvdf said:

This is a disturbing and nauseatingly disgusting habit of Americans. 

 

Someone asks about bringing gold to Thailand and the response is "Gold is considered to be a “monetary instrument” by the US". It's as if they consider every country beyond American borders a geographic extension of the United States. Why mention US customs laws when the question is specifically related to bringing gold to THAILAND!

 

 

 

Sorry to upset you so much.  Usually, when traveling internationally, the limitations for bringing in currency or other “monetary instruments” will be similar from country to country.  I wasn’t able to find anything for what Thailand considers “monetary instruments” so I thought that I would use what is usually a universal definition.

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This is a disturbing and nauseatingly disgusting habit of Americans.


Yeah, we do get in that habit of disregarding all the dying little countries in Europe, sorry.

See you later in the tipping and “free” medical forums...
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I want to bring the gold as it is part of my assets. Don´t want to convert it into money and transfer. In Europe, were I´m from, there´s a limit of 10K (€) per person regarding cash. I was wondering if the same limits apply to gold. In the case of coins it should be as it is an instrument of payment. If I´m right?? But how about gold bars?

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6 hours ago, mogandave said:

Looks like could bring coins...

I came in one time with 12 Maple Leafs, didn't declared them.

 

6 hours ago, PerkinsCuthbert said:

The question is, as already mentioned, why would you want to bring gold into Thailand, when Thai gold, which differs in purity, is far more favoured and easily traded locally?

Guess you don't go to the Gold shops in China Town very often, they love 99.9% Gold coins - thats where I sold my Maple Leafs.  Funny, I had a 1.5 ounce Mexican Peso and they didn't want that, even though they are considered more 'pure' than Maple leafs.  I turned it into a necklace..............

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