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UK PM May's Brexit transition plan could last for years - London Times


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UK PM May's Brexit transition plan could last for years - London Times

 

2018-10-24T001834Z_1_LYNXNPEE9N00M_RTROPTP_4_BRITAIN-EU.JPG

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement on Brexit negotiations with the European Union at Number 10 Downing Street, London September 21, 2018 . Jack Taylor/Pool via Reuters

 

(Reuters) - UK Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plan could leave Britain in a "long running" multiyear transition period, the London Times reported on Wednesday citing leaked documents seen by the newspaper.

 

According to the leaked documents, the plan "could in theory, lead to a long running IP (implementation period)" and the arrangement could last for many years on a "rolling" basis with an "annual decision point" where any transition extension is reviewed, the Times reported http://bit.ly/2EJ625L.

 

The documents were drawn up by May's principal Europe adviser, Oliver Robbins, on instructions from May's office, according to the report.

The documents reveal that cabinet ministers have been presented with different models to work out what would happen if a trade deal to govern UK's future relationship with the EU was not reached by the end of the transition period, the Times said.

 

With just over five months until Britain is scheduled to leave the EU, Brexit talks have stalled over a disagreement on the so-called Northern Irish "backstop", an insurance policy to ensure there will be no return to a hard border on the island of Ireland if a future trading relationship is not agreed in time.

 

May again failed to clinch a deal at an EU summit last week and her decision to signal the possibility of extending a post-Brexit transition period, keeping Britain under EU governance with no say in it, to help end the deadlock, has angered both hardline supporters of Brexit and pro-EU lawmakers.

 

(Reporting by Philip George in Bengaluru)

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2018-10-24
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Of course the most sensible thing would be to not enter transition, but persephone article 50 until we can work out what we want, but May never seems to do the sensible thing. 

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8 hours ago, BritManToo said:

This is her 'cunning plan' to get another 2 years as PM with no competition.

I am sure Theresa wished she had a cunning plan.  Being in transition for years would be dire because it just extends the period of uncertainty.  How can any company plan for the long term?

 

 

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1 hour ago, tebee said:

Of course the most sensible thing would be to not enter transition, but persephone article 50 until we can work out what we want, but May never seems to do the sensible thing. 

What we want,

52% of 'we' want to leave immediately deal or not.

48% of 'we' want to prevaricate and/or vote again (and again and again) until 'we' don't leave at all.

 

There's no working out involved!

The only wrong decision is indecision.

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52% is the majority. 

However 48% not being agree with the majority is a lot of people. 

This was circa 2 years ago.

The British government had all that time to prove these 48% were wrong. 

So far, in my opinion, they haven't proof anything. 

On this base one can assume that the 48% is still opposed, 

and that some of the 52% may have change their mind in the meantime, as what's going on now isn't exactly what they expected. 

Speculation of course. 

 

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3 minutes ago, luckyluke said:

52% is the majority. 

However 48% not being agree with the majority is a lot of people. 

This was circa 2 years ago.

The British government had all that time to prove these 48% were wrong. 

So far, in my opinion, they haven't proof anything. 

On this base one can assume that the 48% is still opposed, 

and that some of the 52% may have change their mind in the meantime, as what's going on now isn't exactly what they expected. 

Speculation of course. 

 

I think given the opportunity an overwhelming amount of people would vote to scrap Brexit completely.  Purely because they are not going to get what they voted for and they see the destruction that it is causing to their country.

 

Just speculation of course 😉

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1 hour ago, luckyluke said:

On this base one can assume that the 48% is still opposed, 

and that some of the 52% may have change their mind in the meantime,

Why not assume some of the 48% have changed their minds, and the 52% are still in favour?

 

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49 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

Why not assume some of the 48% have changed their minds, and the 52% are still in favour?

 

Then why are the Brexiteers so scared about another vote?  And I am not in favour of another referendum, just a vote on the deal when it finally arrives, before we are pushed over the cliff!

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2 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Why not assume some of the 48% have changed their minds, and the 52% are still in favour?

 

Because the 52% are no longer 52%.

Demographics -  old Brexiters have died, and the youth (Whose futures these old had appeared to wish to destroy) have grown in numbers and awareness. Just look at Farage's march the other day attended by an utterly pathetic 1,200 people, whilst the "Peoples vote" march had some 670,000. Brexiteers are getting very nervous, no one seems to want a disaster anymore - what a surprise.

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