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Here's a mystery ,for me anyway


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So for the washing machine  and other appliances I have a UK 3 pin gang switch ,

earthed , there are 3 switches on it, today switching the washer on ,got a slight shock

off the switch , when i asked the wife if she had ever gotten shock before ,she said

a couple of times.

 

Testing with an electrical screwdriver , it only lights up on the one switch ,the rest

of the socket  ,switches ,pattress ,don't light up ,  how can I receive a shock when the switch

is plastic  ????  that's the mystery to me ,its not wet or damp either...... 

 

regards worgeordie

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Lantern said:

A three gang switch is a plate with three switches on it.

@Lantern That that terminology I understand, however the characterisation of it as a U.K. unit and mention of “the socket”  means that exactly what configuration is meant is unclear.

 

the “UK 3 pin gang switch” is unclear as exactly to what it is, there are several different possibilities.

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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Probably a faulty plug. Also the ground might not be complete...Check for power from hot to ground.

should have. Neutral to ground....no no.

A static shock is a lot different than a current, or voltage shock., I know from experience...

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1 minute ago, JohnOFphon said:

A static shock is a lot different than a current, or voltage shock., I know from experience...

Agreed, but we don't know what kind "shock|" the OP received. 

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, VocalNeal said:

Static?

It's more than static , and why on only 1 of he 3 switches 

 

To clarify its a 3 gang 3 pin 13 amp socket switched , UK style  MK made

not Chinese <deleted> , I will take it apart in a while ,see if I can see

problem.

regards worgeordie

Edited by worgeordie
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Sounds like it's just a triple, switched outlet,(3 switches and 3 outlets on one plate)

 

A long shot, but is the area behind the plate full of ants nest or other debris causing a leakage?

 

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2 hours ago, worgeordie said:

It's more than static , and why on only 1 of he 3 switches 

 

To clarify its a 3 gang 3 pin 13 amp socket switched , UK style  MK made

not Chinese <deleted> , I will take it apart in a while ,see if I can see

problem.

regards worgeordie

OK that is more clear, though it is far less than certain that it is sure that it is made in the U.K.  There are quality products produced in China for U.K. companies. There are also c*r*a*p products that exactly copy the U.K. quality products made in China but use c*r*a*p materials and manufacturing. There are very few products actually made in the U.K. 

 

It will be educational to see pictures of the rear. 
 

It is also possible that it has been miss assembled or even miss wired, but is actually a quality item, or that there is something else going on.

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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5 hours ago, sometimewoodworker said:

@Lantern That that terminology I understand, however the characterisation of it as a U.K. unit and mention of “the socket”  means that exactly what configuration is meant is unclear.

 

the “UK 3 pin gang switch” is unclear as exactly to what it is, there are several different possibilities.

Image result for 3 gang 3 pin socket I assume this is what the op is referring to, maybe he can confirm.

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5 hours ago, VocalNeal said:

Static?

You cannot receive an electrical shock from plastic as it is not a conductor of electrical current. As for static it needs friction to occur. Only possible thing I can think of is that the socket has a metallic back box that is connected to earth and as such the socket steel retaining screws are also connected to earth. If there is an earth fault then it is possible the screw heads could be the culprit. The only way to find the problem is with a multi-meter. 

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4 hours ago, terryq said:

Sounds like it's just a triple, switched outlet,(3 switches and 3 outlets on one plate)

 

A long shot, but is the area behind the plate full of ants nest or other debris causing a leakage?

 

Or water, damp, humidity?

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3 hours ago, Cardano said:

Image result for 3 gang 3 pin socket I assume this is what the op is referring to, maybe he can confirm.

That is certainly likely though the fuse in that version is almost certainly completely non standard, if not actually against the relevant regulations. 

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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On 10/4/2022 at 12:53 PM, JohnOFphon said:

A static shock is a lot different than a current, or voltage shock.

Garbage, all electric shock is basically the same, electric current passing through the body.

How any electric shock feels will depend on the level of current which is to a certain extent dependent on the supply source, contact resistance and what part of the body it passes through. It was common practice for electricians to test the supply by putting 2 fingers across live and neutral. The real danger comes when the current passes through the heart.

Static is effectively a discharge so only instantaneous, as is a shock from a capacitor.

When I was at school 3 lads from the year below me were watching cricket when the rain came. They took shelter under a tree and the tree was struck by lightning, 2 died and the survivor was found naked without a hair on his body. He told me later it felt like his feet were on fire and then hit over the head with a hammer. The conclusion was his clothes had been wet enough to offer a lower resistance path to the current.

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Logically thinking, I would say, the switch is of inferior quality. Wrong plastic used or made.

It started to guide power. Dont know how much amps it will switch.

Maybe carbon inside developed, burning plastic, sparking of contacts. Then it starts to loose the protection by plastic. Carbon is a conductor.

The switch is in the metal housing? Then as it is grounded, it shouldnt give a shock.

There for the grounding isnt working properly. Not connected in machine on housing or anywhere else? Or grounding resistance (placed earth rod, total system) is too high and then you are lower in resistance and get shocked.

Static electricity also would be led to ground if properly grounded.

If switch is NOT mounted in ground connected metal housing then ground has no effect.

There for, replace all of your breakers for RCBO's or just have at least one in mainline.

However with just one placed, you have to figure out when, where and with what it goes wrong as all power switches off. 

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20 hours ago, sometimewoodworker said:

That is certainly likely though the fuse in that version is almost certainly completely non standard, if not actually against the relevant regulations. 

Sorry but what fuse are you talking about, there's no fuse in a socket outlet, it's protect by the fuse at the main distribution board. The product shown is a UK version manufactured by MK and fully compliant with all relevant regulations.

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1 hour ago, Cardano said:

Sorry but what fuse are you talking about, there's no fuse in a socket outlet, it's protect by the fuse at the main distribution board. The product shown is a UK version manufactured by MK and fully compliant with all relevant regulations.

The picture you show has a fuse position beside the left most socket immediately under the left most switch. There is no reason for that removable cover unless it is to allow for a fuse to be installed or replaced. 
That is why I question if it is compliant as I know of no U.K. products that have such a cover where it is not for a fuse, and no U.K. socket would need one given that all U.K. plugs have fuses anyway.

Of course the picture is such low quality that there could be a different explanation, if so what is it?

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24 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

The picture you show has a fuse position beside the left most socket immediately under the left most switch. There is no reason for that removable cover unless it is to allow for a fuse to be installed or replaced. 
That is why I question if it is compliant as I know of no U.K. products that have such a cover where it is not for a fuse, and no U.K. socket would need one given that all U.K. plugs have fuses anyway.

Of course the picture is such low quality that there could be a different explanation, if so what is it?

some search using text from other post has good results

 

MK K2737WHI 13 amp 3-Gang Double-Pole Switch Socket

 

more detail show it is 3 ways socket with protect fuse and is british standard product

 

good photo

 

PL00567-40.jpg.81dedfad3e4af297fd243bd2a4f896e7.jpg


 

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38 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

The picture you show has a fuse position beside the left most socket immediately under the left most switch. There is no reason for that removable cover unless it is to allow for a fuse to be installed or replaced. 
That is why I question if it is compliant as I know of no U.K. products that have such a cover where it is not for a fuse, and no U.K. socket would need one given that all U.K. plugs have fuses anyway.

Of course the picture is such low quality that there could be a different explanation, if so what is it?

 

38 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

The picture you show has a fuse position beside the left most socket immediately under the left most switch. There is no reason for that removable cover unless it is to allow for a fuse to be installed or replaced. 
That is why I question if it is compliant as I know of no U.K. products that have such a cover where it is not for a fuse, and no U.K. socket would need one given that all U.K. plugs have fuses anyway.

Of course the picture is such low quality that there could be a different explanation, if so what is it?

Good catch, never noticed the 13A fuse and must admit have never seen one on a socket face-plate before. But that aside it's definitely MK and widely available in UK and fully compliant with UK regulations.

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Wet hands and water goes into the switch. Water will stay at the switch for a while hence the electric shock. My guess anyways.

Edited by extercy
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2 hours ago, SomchaiDIY said:

some search using text from other post has good results

 

MK K2737WHI 13 amp 3-Gang Double-Pole Switch Socket

 

more detail show it is 3 ways socket with protect fuse and is british standard product

 

good photo

 

PL00567-40.jpg.81dedfad3e4af297fd243bd2a4f896e7.jpg


 

That is exactly as I thought. Though I can’t see a reason for a fuse there. Did you find anything saying why it has a fuse or how many of the sockets are protected?

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On 10/4/2022 at 1:19 PM, worgeordie said:

It's more than static , and why on only 1 of he 3 switches 

 

To clarify its a 3 gang 3 pin 13 amp socket switched , UK style  MK made

not Chinese <deleted> , I will take it apart in a while ,see if I can see

problem.

regards worgeordie

Sounds like a dodgy wire inside the unit...

 

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On 10/4/2022 at 1:19 PM, worgeordie said:

It's more than static , and why on only 1 of he 3 switches 

 

To clarify its a 3 gang 3 pin 13 amp socket switched , UK style  MK made

not Chinese <deleted> , I will take it apart in a while ,see if I can see

problem.

regards worgeordie

Photo needed! What make?....MK?

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