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Are They Mistaken?


jaiyenyen

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I had an appointment today, with a teachers agency. When I bought up the subject of a work permit, they told me that I would not need one because I would be working through the agency rather than direct with the school. Are they correct? I thought all foreigners that worked here needed a permit.

The job I've been offered is just what I've been looking for, but, working outside the law is not something I want to do.

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You have been told wrong. A WP is required for any work plus the requirements for teaching is more stringent in terms of qualifications and documentation then it used to be though perhaps the agency will handle those issues. You can look at the pinned topic on the qualifications > http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/Questions-Qu...ns-t103578.html .

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Tywais is perfectly correct. Any employment-related activity without a work permit is technically illegal. Unfortunately, most teaching jobs will not start with a work permit- even if they do eventually come up with the paperwork- but as long as it comes around in first few months, immigration will usually play ball and keep the non-imm. B visa active until the paperwork is completed. It's much faster to renew once you have it. However, most teachers will start their jobs working illegally, even at the best schools in the land.

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As mentioned, yes, you need a Work Permit. I would be very wary of an agency that actually lies to you and says you don't. We sometimes have people who work for us without a WP--because they don't want to change their visa status etc. I always make it very clear that what they are doing, whether the school agrees or not, is illegal.

We've never had a problem with immigration causing a problem between the granting of the visa and actually getting the work permit.

Best of luck to you.

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^Just to agree with Scott- they are not mistaken, they are clearly lying, and relying on your gullibility. Feel free to list their name in our "Schools You Don't Recommend to Your Friends" thread, which of course will be entirely coincidental and not related to this thread at all.

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It is definitely allowed to work on a non-imm 'O' as long as you get the work permit. Many schools are either unaware of this or simply not used to it, and they may try to convince you to switch to 'B' just to make life easier for them- don't do it. The 'O' visa will stay with you even if the work permit ends, but the 'B' will be cancelled if you lose the work permit- meaning you have to leave the country nearly immediately if you lose your job.

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I had an appointment today, with a teachers agency. When I bought up the subject of a work permit, they told me that I would not need one because I would be working through the agency rather than direct with the school. Are they correct? I thought all foreigners that worked here needed a permit.

The job I've been offered is just what I've been looking for, but, working outside the law is not something I want to do.

We are very near the end of the Thai academic year. If the agency wants to employ you for only the remainder of the year (6 or 7 weeks), then there isn't enough time to obtain one. Certainly it's not worth the expense of money and staff-time. I think it's unlikely any school would process a work permit for a teacher so late in the academic year unless the contract extends well into the next academic year.

All teachers have to work in Thailand at some time illegally. Unfortunately this is a fact of life here.

Look on the positive side - at least they can't deduct tax

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I still don't quite understand why they wouldn't get the work permit for you (especially being less than truthful). We routinely get work permits for people at the end of the contractual period--on the assumption that they will continue employment. As a matter of fact, just started processing for a person today and technically his contract will end on 30 Apr. Of course, we hope he will renew and stay on.

We deduct a certain portion of the salary during the probationary period that is given back to people who complete their contract. If he would leave, the money wouldn't be returned. It wouldn't pay for the entire work permit, but it would be sufficient to make it worth our while and his while to be as legal as possible.

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