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Anyone Recommend What To Order At A Jewish Place


Maccheroncini

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I want to try this place called Chabad it's a Jewish resturants.

It is exciting to try but I have no clue what the food is all about.  I can't read or pronounce the words.

Anyone recommendation what I should order or try? Thanks

This is the web, in Hebrew http://www.chabadthailand.co.il/

I've called in on Chabad House before to check out their dining facility.

The menu is fairly extensive, written in English, and the prices are a only tad above what one might expect to find in a local (Thai) restaurant - moderate to low .

For atmosphere , rate their dining room a little above average Thai restaurant. Cleanliness, rate above local restaurant.

Have no idea how the food tastes but the menu offered pretty usual dishes . I would have had no hesitation in trying some of them. Make their own bread too.

They also do take-away.

They keep their kitchen and dining room strictly in accordance with their dietary laws so it should be hygienic.

They are not open Friday evening through to Sat evening. I think they are open from about 7.00 am to 9.00 pm on other days.

Cheers

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I want to try this place called Chabad it's a Jewish resturants.

It is exciting to try but I have no clue what the food is all about.  I can't read or pronounce the words.

Anyone recommendation what I should order or try? Thanks

This is the web, in Hebrew http://www.chabadthailand.co.il/

"Beit Chabad is for many Israelis their home away from home,"

"isreali" food is very much "arab" food, has many similarities to, say lebanese foods

falafel - (fried chickpea mousse balls in a pita wrapper, sauce and salads) try it with lebaneh!

Hommous - (Chickpea concoction- dip)

tabbouleh - (parsley, tomato, bulgur "salad")

babaghanoush - (made from grilled aubergines - eggplant)

tahini - sesame - (dip)

israeli couscous

Shakshooka - (bell peppers, onions, omato, eggs)

some "imports" from polish/russian jews:

Pelmeni

Kotlety

Pirozhki

Shashlyk

Blini

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Is this restaurant in Chiang Mai?

If yes, where?

Yes, it's on Thanon Chang Klan. As I recall, it is past Sridornchai on the left side of the road - heading away from the Night Bazar. Haven't eaten there though. I have seen quite a few people dining there as I walked by it.

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Can't go wrong with MATZA BALLS :-) My favorites from above...

falafel - (fried chickpea mousse balls in a pita wrapper, sauce and salads) try it with lebaneh!

Hommous - (Chickpea concoction- dip)

tabbouleh - (parsley, tomato, bulgur "salad")

babaghanoush - (made from grilled aubergines - eggplant)

If you are hungry for PORK or SHELLFISH... forget about it!

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If you want some nice Israeli food in Chiang Mai at a PUBLIC restaurant try the Jerusalem Cafe on Moon Muang Rd. The menu is in English. I had some very nice Jewish style beef patties there but found their lentil soup way too salty. Israeli food is mostly the same as Arabic food except for some Eastern European influences (for example matzoh ball soup). The most popular dishes are indeed falafel (fried chickpea balls), babaghanoush (eggplant/oil dip), and hummus (chick pea/oil dip). BTW, I have walked by Chabad. Chabad is not a public restaurant to my knowledge, they run a missionary outreach to other Jews, mostly Israelis.

Edited by Jingthing
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The only Palestinian restaurant I encountered in San Francisco served the same food as Israeli food except they used flat breads to wrap the sandwiches. I don't know if that is big in Israel or not. However they did have schwarma!

Yeah' Shawarma, another nice snack in a Pita bread (unleavened) wrapper from the middle east, closely resembling Turkish kebab or Greek souvlaki, which is all more or less the same thing, except the ingredients vary and Turks and Greek use Pide (leavened)!

Edited by Samuian
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Another clarification. There is a BIG difference between Jewish food and Israeli food. Israeli food is mostly Middle Eastern Arabic influenced. Jewish food is mostly Eastern European influenced, for example beef brisket, bagel, pastrami sandwich, roasted goose, Kosher pickle. For Jews that came from other areas, for example Spain or Morocco or Ethiopia, of course their Jewish food is also going to be very different.

Edited by Jingthing
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When I lived in London, I often went to Blooms famous kosher restaurant at Aldgate East and many years ago even had the pleasure of being there the same time as the late great Sophie Tucker....boy could she eat! Anyway food...here's some delicious Jewish food I recall, sorry if the spelling might be wrong.

Kreplach Soup

Knaidlach Soup

Lochshen Soup

Salt Beef and Latkas

Chopped Herring

Chopped Liver

Fried Vuscht and Eggs

Smoked Salmon and Lox Bagels

Plus all the other middle eastern delights previously mentioned

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Thanks for the mouth watering list. All of those are Eastern European influenced and I think not stereotypical Israeli foods.

Just responding to the OP who mentioned Jewish as opposed to Israeli.

Don't know the origin myself, all I know these are foods served in Blooms and delicious they are too.

Always eager to improve my knowledge of food origins.

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Thanks for the mouth watering list. All of those are Eastern European influenced and I think not stereotypical Israeli foods.

I miss good stuffed cabbage , mushroom barley soup , chopped liver , etc. etc.

Anyone remember Ratner's on the lower east side ?

In Pattaya, there are many Russian restaurants where you can get similar dishes, especially stuffed cabbage. Yes, I remember Ratners on the NY Lower East Side.now closed. It was known as Ratner's Dairy Restaurant. I have a story about my one visit there. Allen Ginsberg, the great deceased American poet was there eating with one of his boy toys. I am a big fan but he made it obvious he didn't want to be disturbed. So I don't really remember the food much. Did anyone mention knishes?

Edited by Jingthing
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The only Palestinian restaurant I encountered in San Francisco served the same food as Israeli food except they used flat breads to wrap the sandwiches. I don't know if that is big in Israel or not. However they did have schwarma!

Hey Jingthing - was that a Lebanese restaurant? A Lebanese friend of mine took me to Fattoush on Church Street in Noe Valley. It was exactly like Israeli food. Those flatbread sandwiches are served in Israel as well.

To the OP - you can't go wrong with the falafel, shawarma and piroshkis (polish/russian). Sorry folks, being Jewish and having traveled to Israel, I don't regard it as high cuisine. although some of it can be tasty, and it is comfort food for me.

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Thank you everyone and thanks so much Jingthing, I suspect this Chabad place is not a public restauant as well.  

I think the Jerusalem Cafe you've recommended might be a the one I should try.

If you want some nice Israeli food in Chiang Mai at a PUBLIC restaurant try the Jerusalem Cafe on Moon Muang Rd. The menu is in English. I had some very nice Jewish style beef patties there but found their lentil soup way too salty. Israeli food is mostly the same as Arabic food except for some Eastern European influences (for example matzoh ball soup). The most popular dishes are indeed falafel (fried chickpea balls), babaghanoush (eggplant/oil dip), and hummus (chick pea/oil dip). BTW, I have walked by Chabad. Chabad is not a public restaurant to my knowledge, they run a missionary outreach to other Jews, mostly Israelis.
Edited by Maccheroncini
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Hey Jingthing - was that a Lebanese restaurant? A Lebanese friend of mine took me to Fattoush on Church Street in Noe Valley. It was exactly like Israeli food. Those flatbread sandwiches are served in Israel as well.

No I am talking about the really excellent falafel/schwarma joint next to the Roxie (if they are still open?) on 16th St near Valencia called Truly Mediterranean. It is run by Palestinians so I figure that its a Palestinian restaurant. Sorry, we are talking about San Francisco.

Edited by Jingthing
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As for sbk having to remove alot of posts... I think it's too bad. Food is the great uniter that cuts across race, religion, and country. Food has no alliances. It is about people coming together. If anything, have a meal around people you don't know so well and learn more about them and see the commonalities between all of us.

As for the Chabad house, I had a friend who swore by their Kosher Dogs. He said they were the best around. I've never had one there, though I have had many another nosh. Good value. And the kind of food you'd expect.

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As for sbk having to remove alot of posts... I think it's too bad. Food is the great uniter that cuts across race, religion, and country. Food has no alliances. It is about people coming together. If anything, have a meal around people you don't know so well and learn more about them and see the commonalities between all of us.

As for the Chabad house, I had a friend who swore by their Kosher Dogs. He said they were the best around. I've never had one there, though I have had many another nosh. Good value. And the kind of food you'd expect.

Ditto--I sometimes find SBK a little heavy handed, not that I know how to 'moderate' but I agree with Mr.T[ or realthaideal, whatever]--this was a thread about food--not politics--get it together, guys and girls.

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As it has been clarified - not all Jewish food is necessarily mid eastern - Israeli - Arab food - but that whta is served at Chabad or places called "Lebanese", Palestinian" will certainly be just that NOT east europaean-russian (Ashkenazi Jews) type.. like Plinsi and stuffed cabbage or chopped marinated herring!

It is the preparation, distinction of what is allowed (kosher) and what is not

During the course of two thousand years of life in the Diaspora, Jews have created a rich culinary tradition. Jewish food encompasses a plethora of tastes and flavors reflecting the particular traditions of the many Jewish communities worldwide. Everywhere traditional Jewish food is prepared according to the rules of kashrut (the Jewish dietary laws), such as the prohibition against consuming certain animals, the adherence to specific ways of preparing the meat for consumption, the prohibition against cooking or heating food on the Sabbath, and the prohibition against mixing meat and dairy products.
The Sephardi Jews of the Balkan countries and Turkey developed their own rich cooking tradition, keeping alive many recipes from their past in the Iberian Peninsula. Jewish communities of Northern Africa have a tremendously rich culinary tradition. There are several Jewish cuisines in the countries of the Middle East, notably in Iran and in Yemen, and the Jews of the Caucasus, Central Asia, India, and Ethiopia all have their own unique styles.

Source and great Link too:

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Chabab is an ultra-orthadox (religious) group of individuals who do among other things outreach to the travelling Jewish community. There are Chabab Houses all over the world to offer religious services, help to Jewish travellers, and many of them offer restaurant services.

The restaurant is open to everyone, however it caters to those travellers who either rely of Kosher food, and travellers who want to go to a centre where there are Jewish services for the start of the sabbath on Friday night and Saturday untill sundown, and Jewish holidays.

I am sure that Chabab in Chiang Mai would welcome anyone who wishes to eat there.

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some "imports" from polish/russian jews:

Pelmeni

Kotlety

Pirozhki

Shashlyk

Blini

Nice one "Samuian"

Pirozhki

Pierogi

2 1/2 cups flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 egg

2 teaspoons oil

3/4 cup warm water

<The filling was snipped>

4. Vary the proportions and ingredients in this recipe to suit your taste.

5. Mix the flour with the salt in a deep bowl.

6. Add the egg, oil and water to make a medium soft dough.

7. Knead on a floured board until the dough is smooth.

8. Caution: Too much kneading will toughen the dough.

9. Divide the dough into 2 parts.

10. Cover and let stand for at least 10 minutes.

11. Prepare the filling.

(Up to you what you wish to put in them)

12. The filling should be thick enough to hold its shape.

13. Roll the dough quite thin on a floured board.

14. Cut rounds with a large biscuit cutter, or the open end of a glass.

15. Put the round in the palm of your hand.

16. Place a spoonful of filling in it, fold over to form a half circle and press the edges together with the fingers.

17. The edges should be free of filling.

18. Be sure the edges are sealed well to prevent the filling from running out.

19. Place the pierogi on a floured board or tea towel and then cover with another tea towel to prevent them from drying out.

20. COOKING: Drop a few pierogies into a large quantity of rapidly boiling salted water.

21. Do not attempt to cook too many at a time.

22. Stir VERY gently with a wooden spoon to separate them and to prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pot.

23. Continue boiling for 3-4 minutes.

24. The cooling period will depend upon the size you made it, the thickness of the dough and the filling.

25. Pierogies will be ready when they are puffed.

26. Remove them with a perforated spoon or skimmer to a colander and drain thoroughly.

27. Place in a deep dish, sprinkle generously with melted butter to prevent them from sticking.

28. Cover and keep them hot until all are cooked.

29. Serve in a large dish without piling or crowding them.

30. Top with melted butter - or chopped onions/chives lightly browned in butter.

31. REHEATING: One of the great things about pierogies, is that they can be made in large quantities, refrigerated, frozen and reheated without lost of quality.

32. Many prefer reheated pierogies as compared to freshly boiled ones.

33. To re-heat, you can: 1) pan fry pierogies in butter until they are light in color or, 2) heat the pierogies in the top of a double boiler or in the oven until they are hot and plump or, 3) deep fry them.

Loved these years ago when I was young.

******

Kotlety

Breaded escalope / cutlet of Beef, Chickn or Veal.

(Commonly know as a Vienna Schnitzell consisting of a thin slice of veal coated in breadcrumbs and fried.)

******

Shashlyk

Shashlik is Turk/Russian type of kebab. Marinated skewered chicken, grilled to perfection combines with grilled vegetables make this the ultimate cookout food.

******

With the other dishes that you mentioned "Samuian", me not rushing (Russian) to find out as I am Polski, Smacznego :o

Yours truly,

Kan Win :D

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  • 3 weeks later...
As for sbk having to remove alot of posts... I think it's too bad. Food is the great uniter that cuts across race, religion, and country. Food has no alliances. It is about people coming together. If anything, have a meal around people you don't know so well and learn more about them and see the commonalities between all of us.

As for the Chabad house, I had a friend who swore by their Kosher Dogs. He said they were the best around. I've never had one there, though I have had many another nosh. Good value. And the kind of food you'd expect.

I guess it wasn't the Chabad in Chiang Mai. I went there to try them and they denied having them. Maybe you have to know the secret handshake?

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