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New Thai PM Yingluck Takes Office With Unity Pledge


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New Thai PM takes office with unity pledge

BANGKOK, August 9, 2011 (AFP) - Thailand's new Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra officially took office on Monday with a vow to reunite the troubled nation after years of turmoil following the overthrow of her fugitive brother.

Yingluck, a 44-year-old political novice, was elected as Thailand's first female premier in a parliamentary vote on Friday but had to complete formalities including official approval by King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

"His Majesty the King has given his endorsement," House Speaker Somsak Kietsuranont told AFP after an audience with the 83-year-old monarch, who has been in hospital since September 2009.

Yingluck swept to an election victory last month with the support of her older brother Thaksin Shinawatra, who is loathed by the elite in government, military and palace circles, and was toppled in a 2006 coup.

Bhumibol, who has reigned for more than six decades, is seen as a stabilising force in the troubled country but has no official political role.

Yingluck, a businesswoman described by her brother as his "clone", faces the tough challenge of bringing unity to the politically volatile kingdom.

"It is a great and challenging responsibility which requires the participation and support of all sectors to overcome problems and move the country forward," she said in an acceptance speech at her party headquarters.

"I will use my knowledge, competence and intellect to work hard with honesty to bring peace, unity and reconciliation to our nation," she added.

Thaksin, a former telecoms tycoon, lives in self-imposed exile to avoid a jail sentence imposed in his absence for corruption.

His overthrow by the army heralded five years of political crises both in the Thai parliament and on the streets, where his elite-backed foes and his mainly working-class supporters have held crippling rival protests.

The situation escalated last year when more than 90 people, mostly civilians, were killed in clashes between the army and "Red Shirt" protesters who largely support Thaksin for his populist policies while in office.

Thaksin or his allies have won the most seats in the past four elections, but the courts reversed the results of the last two polls.

Thailand has also seen 18 actual or attempted military coups since it became a constitutional monarchy in 1932.

Yingluck has formed a six-party coalition, holding three-fifths of the seats in the lower house of parliament, in an attempt to bolster her hold on power.

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-- (c) Copyright AFP 2011-08-09

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Yingluck: I won't work for any particular group

By The Nation

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Says she will work towards solving problems, not taking revenge

Yingluck Shinawatra - Thailand's first female prime minister - promised yesterday to work for all Thais and the country, not for any particular group. Her femininity would be the strength, she said, not a weakness of the premiership.

"I will not work for any particular group but for the country and for all Thai people," she said in her address at the Pheu Thai Party headquarters after receiving the royal command officially endorsing her as prime minister.

"Being a female prime minister in the current situation will pose a lot of major challenges, but that will not pose an obstacle to the work," she said. "[On the] contrary, strength and gentleness and listening to different opinions will open a new alternative to solving problems easily."

Yingluck, 44, become the 28th Thai prime minister after her Pheu Thai Party won victory in the July 3 election and the House of Representatives appointed her to the top government job last week.

In her official address after the royal command, Yingluck expressed her gratitude to His Majesty the King for his kindness and trust in appointing her as prime minister. She also thanked Pheu Thai Party members, her voters, lovers of democracy and MPs for their support for her leadership.

She promised to use her knowledge, competence and intelligence to lead the government, as well as to cooperate with all parties to bring peace and unity to the country.

"I have the strongest intention to work towards solving the problems of our brothers and sisters, and not towards revenge, which could create more problems," she said.

She begged the cooperation of all people to hold a celebration to honour and to offer best wishes to His Majesty the King on the special occasion of his 84th birthday on December 5 - and to Her Majesty the Queen on her birthday this Friday, August 12.

After the royal command, the next task for the new prime minister is to select her Cabinet members. Yingluck said about 80 per cent of the Cabinet list had been settled and she would submit it for the approval of His Majesty the King in a couple of days.

The ruling Pheu Thai Party is considering the remaining 20 per cent of the list and will finish soon. Other coalition parties have already completed their selection, she said.

Of Pheu Thai's quota, four of five people are not members of the party but outsiders invited to join the government, she said.

Asked why many outsiders declined the invitation to join the Cabinet, Yingluck said the party had invited many candidates and some had declined to take up a position because of differences in some details of policy.

"It does not mean everybody we talked with had to agree to take up a position," Yingluck told reporters.

Asked why MPs from the Northeastern region received only three portfolio positions, Yingluck said she did not arrange the Cabinet on a quota basis but considered qualifications, experience, seniority and capability.

"Regional representation was also taken into account as we needed a good combination of people from many areas," she said.

Many MPs from the Northeast, representing more than 100, expressed disappointment with the portfolio arrangements as they received only a few Cabinet posts. Some said those marked for a position needed to have good fortune, connections and money.

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-- The Nation 2011-08-09

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Can someone explain what uniform she is wearing, is she now in the army or the police? What about the medals? What wars or campaigns has she fought in?

4ea2895582bd8b004aeb8c1c8dff-grande.jpg

"Like her male predecessors, Yingluck will wear a white uniform and prostrate before the portrait of His Majesty the King in a ceremony to accept the royal command."

I believe it is the decoration of the office; much like any government administrative position (school teachers are not special forces units, ok?). Nothing to do with wars or combat action. That's a strange comment.

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Can someone explain what uniform she is wearing, is she now in the army or the police? What about the medals? What wars or campaigns has she fought in?

4ea2895582bd8b004aeb8c1c8dff-grande.jpg

"Like her male predecessors, Yingluck will wear a white uniform and prostrate before the portrait of His Majesty the King in a ceremony to accept the royal command."

I believe it is the decoration of the office; much like any government administrative position (school teachers are not special forces units, ok?). Nothing to do with wars or combat action. That's a strange comment.

Thanks, I've never understood the Thai's fascination with uniforms and medals, something they appear to have in common with North Korea.

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Can someone explain what uniform she is wearing, is she now in the army or the police? What about the medals? What wars or campaigns has she fought in?

What I also found curious this morning was that not only was Yingluck wearing a white uniform and decorations but so were her husband and son.

After 25 years serving in the RAF in the UK the only medal I have is a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded after 18 year service.

There are road sweepers in Thailand with more medals than me but I earned mine.

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25 years in the RAF (British I imagine) and you are sad enough to admit only LSGC medal, and then not understand Thai cluture.... tut tut tut should have joined

the British Army matey, might have had a bit more fun :lol:

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Yeah Its a "bad do" for the Issan MP,s having forked out all that dough buying votes and only a few being able to get their noses in the trough!.

yeah it's funny, i bet most people on here expected a lot more of them would get in

Yeah I find it hilarious myself Nurofiend ,but then again its never over till the fat lady sings is it , but it would seem as far as Issan goes the fat lady seems to have an acute case of laryngitis eh,LOL.
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Yeah Its a "bad do" for the Issan MP,s having forked out all that dough buying votes and only a few being able to get their noses in the trough!.

so have you had your nose put out of place ?

Edited by adder
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Can someone explain what uniform she is wearing, is she now in the army or the police? What about the medals? What wars or campaigns has she fought in?

4ea2895582bd8b004aeb8c1c8dff-grande.jpg

"Like her male predecessors, Yingluck will wear a white uniform and prostrate before the portrait of His Majesty the King in a ceremony to accept the royal command."

I believe it is the decoration of the office; much like any government administrative position (school teachers are not special forces units, ok?). Nothing to do with wars or combat action. That's a strange comment.

Not so strange. In the US, no one wears a military style uniform without ever being in the military. And medals and ribbons almost exclusively come from wars or combat action. There have been members of congress here, called out on their wearing a military medal when in fact they never were in the military. Thai politicians love a military uniform but can't stand the military. go figure. By the By, she does look rather striking in that uniform. Hmmm

Edited by khaowong1
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Can someone explain what uniform she is wearing, is she now in the army or the police? What about the medals? What wars or campaigns has she fought in?

4ea2895582bd8b004aeb8c1c8dff-grande.jpg

"Like her male predecessors, Yingluck will wear a white uniform and prostrate before the portrait of His Majesty the King in a ceremony to accept the royal command."

I believe it is the decoration of the office; much like any government administrative position (school teachers are not special forces units, ok?). Nothing to do with wars or combat action. That's a strange comment.

Thanks, I've never understood the Thai's fascination with uniforms and medals, something they appear to have in common with North Korea.

:lol:

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Thanks, I've never understood the Thai's fascination with uniforms and medals, something they appear to have in common with North Korea.

I would assume it started with Plaek in 1932. He wanted Siam to become a modern nation and looked at the US and Germany for inspiration...

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Yeah Its a "bad do" for the Issan MP,s having forked out all that dough buying votes and only a few being able to get their noses in the trough!.

n do u have any proof that vote buying actually occurred?

It is like one idiot says there was vote buying and all chant the same thing without using their brains...

Look at Abhisit government :bah:

Is there anything to his credit? except for inflation and ruined economy?

Yes Thaksin was bad because he tightened visa policy (for farangs), he was bad because poor people get the benefits (foul cry by the elites)...

This government is democratically elected unlike the previous one... :whistling:

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Yeah Its a "bad do" for the Issan MP,s having forked out all that dough buying votes and only a few being able to get their noses in the trough!.

n do u have any proof that vote buying actually occurred?

It is like one idiot says there was vote buying and all chant the same thing without using their brains...

Look at Abhisit government :bah:

Is there anything to his credit? except for inflation and ruined economy?

Yes Thaksin was bad because he tightened visa policy (for farangs), he was bad because poor people get the benefits (foul cry by the elites)...

This government is democratically elected unlike the previous one... :whistling:

you don't have to look any further than farrangs wives to confirm about yote buying. have you fell off the back of a No 9 bus?? The other government was elected in because the previous guy did a runner, for unknown reasons B). Abhisit' was too nice a guy --compared to WE ARE FAMILY.

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Yeah Its a "bad do" for the Issan MP,s having forked out all that dough buying votes and only a few being able to get their noses in the trough!.

n do u have any proof that vote buying actually occurred?

It is like one idiot says there was vote buying and all chant the same thing without using their brains...

Look at Abhisit government :bah:

Is there anything to his credit? except for inflation and ruined economy?

Yes Thaksin was bad because he tightened visa policy (for farangs), he was bad because poor people get the benefits (foul cry by the elites)...

This government is democratically elected unlike the previous one... :whistling:

you don't have to look any further than farrangs wives to confirm about yote buying. have you fell off the back of a No 9 bus?? The other government was elected in because the previous guy did a runner, for unknown reasons B). Abhisit' was too nice a guy --compared to WE ARE FAMILY.

No question that there was vote buying - by BOTH sides, don't you agree?

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I thought this might be a good opportunity to address thecore group of “contributors” to Thai Forum.

I, and others are disturbed by your consistent insults tothe people of Thailand,their religion, political beliefs and way of life.

Many of us want to know…”When are you leaving?” Where I come from, we have a saying, “If youdo not like what you are doing, do something else.” Clearly, you can do better. Please! Just GO!

Every news story you comment on is greeted with the sametired cynical uninformed dribble, to the point where we can pretty much predictwhat you will say.

It always comes down to the most base level, and often farin advance of the facts.

Well…here is a headline. Every major city in the world has a “Red Light District”, even theportions of Londonthat are not smoldering.

Every Red Light District has an element of corruption ofsome officials.

Our guess is that a majority of you spend a lot of time andmoney in these areas, learn your Thai and Thai Culture lessons from Bar Girls,and would only be too happy to grease a few palms to avoid time in jail.

Many people around the world read this site to get a feelingfor the culture.

To those people we say…Thailand is a beautiful andgraceful country based on respect for others, honesty, fair play and hardwork. The people are friendly andindustrious. The great percentage of Thailandpractices Buddhism, and the patience and awareness of this wonderful faith isreflected in daily life.

I have dozens of real life examples of the honesty that the“average’ Thai employs. I have given a500 baht note where a fifty was required, and had a shop keeper run 3 blocks toreturn it. My wife left her hat in ataxi, and later in the day, the driver returned to our condo and left it withsecurity. I have returned defectiveequipment to shops, and received a cheerful replacement. I have struggled to communicate, and time andtime again had a helpful stranger step forward to help translate.

My experience is different than yours. I am a “family man” with a beautiful wife whostarted in family who sold fruit near the Palace, and now owns and operates aninternational company traveling between Bangkok,Hong Kong and the USA. (I strongly encourage you at this point toput down your pen. Do not make anycomment involving her.) I, like so manyExpats… do not require the “services” of Nana, Soi Cowboy and the otherneighborhoods your kind fuel with a lust for cheap booze and sex.

It is you who are the problem…Not the Thai people.

It is you who is lacking the moral fortitude to have arespect filled life.

Please. Stopprojecting your negative self loathing onto people who are truly one of thebest cultures our planet has to offer.

The people of Thailand, regardless of politicalleaning all agree on one thing…The King of Thailand has done much for hiscountry, and deserving of the highest level of Respect all of us can givehim. He is, as is His family…in everysense of the word…Royal.

The “read between the lines” innuendo is not appreciated,rude and disrespectful.

So, for the last time…

When are you leaving?

(I will happily chip in for the one way cab ride to theairport!)

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It is rude to post a flaming 'letter' to other posters without even having the decency to name them.

Obviously lives up to his name if you put 3rd after it!

LOL. RichardinBKK has a few good points, and lends a noble effort. I do, however, have to disagree on the "illusion" he illustrates that Thailand is all that. I am not sure that his post would have been more sincere had he opened his own thread, instead of interrupting with such fervent, generalized chastising. Interrupting is OK, but not at this level, in my very own opinion. I would like to see this as its own thread so people can take him to task. RichardinBKK? Are you up for it; your own thread, I mean? Your taxi bill is going to be a whopper because the man is outside my house with the meter running, and I will not be packing any time in this life.

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