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Aeon Atms


mouse999

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries... first it is your bank that might charge you (look at the general conditions of your bank) and then the "standard" 150 Baht withdrawal fee that I have seen with almost every Thai bank...

For AEON, be careful, there have been other threads about problems using their atms... see

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Nationwide now charge 2% plus one pound for all foreign withdrawals, aeon do not charge the 150 baht fee.

this poster is correct, there is no 150 baht fee with Aeon atms

they will deliver up to 40 notes in one transaction if your bank allows it

despite many nay sayers on here, i have used Aeon now since UOB bank started charging the 150 baht in October 2009

i have never had a single problem at any of their machines

however the biggest problem is that too many farangs use them at busy locations and on weekends quickly run out of money

so you may have to run around a bit or queue for a while but at a 150 baht saving, (a days wage for Thais in some areas) i think its worth the extra effort

there are four units in Pattaya

x 2 at tesco north pattaya x1 at big c extra and x1 at homeworks south pattaya

the one at Homeworks always seems to be in service

i hope that helps

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries...

This is definetely wrong.

As already said AEON does not charge the 150 THB.

Secondly, depending on your bank (and country of origin) there are e.g. VISAPlus Debitcards which do not charge a fee at the originating bank. It will not the help the poster to name the examples for Germany (DKB Visa, Postbank Sparcard).

The DKB even refunds the 150 THB.

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries...

This is definetely wrong.

As already said AEON does not charge the 150 THB.

Secondly, depending on your bank (and country of origin) there are e.g. VISAPlus Debitcards which do not charge a fee at the originating bank. It will not the help the poster to name the examples for Germany (DKB Visa, Postbank Sparcard).

The DKB even refunds the 150 THB.

Well... just shows this bank hides their fees very well... either in the exchange rate (which they can set themselves) or not giving you interest on the money in your debitcard account... or in any other way...

There is no such thing as free withdrawals... because your bank will be charged a fee by the local bank who owns the ATM... this is called the Interchange fee and must be paid by the cardholder bank to the ATM owning bank... worldwide system... for normal purchases, it's just the other way round... the local bank of the merchant shop (called acquiring bank) has to pay the interchange fee to the cardholder bank...

You think DKB or Postbank are giving anything away for free? They make good money with cards... somebody pays for it... and most likely it is you, the cardholder...

P.S.: I'm working in this industry since many years... trust me, I know they charge you withdrawal fees to cover their expenses on cash withdrawals...

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries...

This is definetely wrong.

As already said AEON does not charge the 150 THB.

Secondly, depending on your bank (and country of origin) there are e.g. VISAPlus Debitcards which do not charge a fee at the originating bank. It will not the help the poster to name the examples for Germany (DKB Visa, Postbank Sparcard).

The DKB even refunds the 150 THB.

Well... just shows this bank hides their fees very well... either in the exchange rate (which they can set themselves) or not giving you interest on the money in your debitcard account... or in any other way...

There is no such thing as free withdrawals... because your bank will be charged a fee by the local bank who owns the ATM... this is called the Interchange fee and must be paid by the cardholder bank to the ATM owning bank... worldwide system... for normal purchases, it's just the other way round... the local bank of the merchant shop (called acquiring bank) has to pay the interchange fee to the cardholder bank...

You think DKB or Postbank are giving anything away for free? They make good money with cards... somebody pays for it... and most likely it is you, the cardholder...

P.S.: I'm working in this industry since many years... trust me, I know they charge you withdrawal fees to cover their expenses on cash withdrawals...

Sorry, but you are just wrong on this one. This is one of the reasons why companies often prefer to employ younger people; they are not so stuck in their ways. ;)

In the UK we have quite a few institutions that pass on the global payments system rate directly. i.e. VISA/Mastercard rates.

We can check these rates directly from VISA/Mastercard websites and compare them with the rate received.

So this, in conjunction with the AEON system, allows us to receive the full VISA/Mastercard rate via the ATM.

This has been checked and cross-checked.

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries...

This is definetely wrong.

As already said AEON does not charge the 150 THB.

Secondly, depending on your bank (and country of origin) there are e.g. VISAPlus Debitcards which do not charge a fee at the originating bank. It will not the help the poster to name the examples for Germany (DKB Visa, Postbank Sparcard).

The DKB even refunds the 150 THB.

Well... just shows this bank hides their fees very well... either in the exchange rate (which they can set themselves) or not giving you interest on the money in your debitcard account... or in any other way...

There is no such thing as free withdrawals... because your bank will be charged a fee by the local bank who owns the ATM... this is called the Interchange fee and must be paid by the cardholder bank to the ATM owning bank... worldwide system... for normal purchases, it's just the other way round... the local bank of the merchant shop (called acquiring bank) has to pay the interchange fee to the cardholder bank...

You think DKB or Postbank are giving anything away for free? They make good money with cards... somebody pays for it... and most likely it is you, the cardholder...

P.S.: I'm working in this industry since many years... trust me, I know they charge you withdrawal fees to cover their expenses on cash withdrawals...

Sorry, but you are just wrong on this one. This is one of the reasons why companies often prefer to employ younger people; they are not so stuck in their ways. ;)

In the UK we have quite a few institutions that pass on the global payments system rate directly. i.e. VISA/Mastercard rates.

We can check these rates directly from VISA/Mastercard websites and compare them with the rate received.

So this, in conjunction with the AEON system, allows us to receive the full VISA/Mastercard rate via the ATM.

This has been checked and cross-checked.

cheers guys for the info i will have a look at those visa/mastercard rates! 2-3 years ago when i was in asia i was getting very good rates out of the atm's around asia without charge! i remember getting $2.11 for £1

out of the AZN atm's in cambo

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There is no such thing as "free withdrawals" in foreign countries...

This is definetely wrong.

As already said AEON does not charge the 150 THB.

Secondly, depending on your bank (and country of origin) there are e.g. VISAPlus Debitcards which do not charge a fee at the originating bank. It will not the help the poster to name the examples for Germany (DKB Visa, Postbank Sparcard).

The DKB even refunds the 150 THB.

Well... just shows this bank hides their fees very well... either in the exchange rate (which they can set themselves) or not giving you interest on the money in your debitcard account... or in any other way...

There is no such thing as free withdrawals... because your bank will be charged a fee by the local bank who owns the ATM... this is called the Interchange fee and must be paid by the cardholder bank to the ATM owning bank... worldwide system... for normal purchases, it's just the other way round... the local bank of the merchant shop (called acquiring bank) has to pay the interchange fee to the cardholder bank...

You think DKB or Postbank are giving anything away for free? They make good money with cards... somebody pays for it... and most likely it is you, the cardholder...

P.S.: I'm working in this industry since many years... trust me, I know they charge you withdrawal fees to cover their expenses on cash withdrawals...

Sorry, but you are just wrong on this one. This is one of the reasons why companies often prefer to employ younger people; they are not so stuck in their ways. ;)

In the UK we have quite a few institutions that pass on the global payments system rate directly. i.e. VISA/Mastercard rates.

We can check these rates directly from VISA/Mastercard websites and compare them with the rate received.

So this, in conjunction with the AEON system, allows us to receive the full VISA/Mastercard rate via the ATM.

This has been checked and cross-checked.

+1

Same for some US institutions. I have a Charles Schwab VISA debit card, for ATM withdrawals there are no withdrawal fees or surcharges.

Always getting the daily corporate exchange rate, that can easily be looked up on the internet.

If I use AEON, there are no charges, if I use a different bank, the initial 150 baht fee will be reimbursed by my bank.

However to not miss use this privilege, I always try to use the AEON ATMs.

And as mentioned above by timekeeper, UOB used to also provide free ATM withdrawals, but has since stopped doing so.

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