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Smoke, Smog, Dust 2012 Chiang Mai


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New to Chiang Mai. Last year, of course, was not like this. Once the pollution reaches this level, does it stay this bad until it rains or does it dramatically increases and decrease during the next weeks ahead?

pretty much until the rain comes which could be anywhere from tomorrow to April/May. The burning seems to decrease locally after Sonkran which is mid April.

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This smoke condition is not just in Northern Thailand. I drove up from Hua Hin on Wednesday. One hour North of Hua Hin as I left Highway #4 heading North I encountered the same density of smoke as in Chiang Mai now and drove through it the entire day. I encountered actual fire on both sides of the highway South of Lampang though it was evident the entire

journey. I fear it is going to be a long burning season.

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Does anyone know whether Nan is just as smoky as Chiang Mai right now?

These are the numbers from the aqmthai.com website. PM10 in red (ug/m)^3.

a67. Municipality Nan. 2012-02-17. 8:00:00. 0.9. 9.0. 14.0. 02.01. 92.92.

Chiang Mai is current at: Quite a bump from earlier today. Appears the Nam station is not updated as often so it could be close to the CM numbers by now.

35t. City Hall. 2012-02-17. 16:00:00. 2.0. 43.2. 55.7. 0.3. 123.45.

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Ok bright star, and just how do you propose to do that, how do you change a very cost effective habit of centuries for rural farmers? Also, what makes you think the pollution is caused by burning within Thailand, maybe the majority of it is carried in on air currents from China and the like!

Was at HTT today, so much smog you could hardly see across the lake.

On the way out passed loads of orange workers, burning piles of leaves all along the road.

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Driving from Lampang to Cmai up over the mountain range and down into the valley bowl in which Cmai sits, one can actually denote the various colored levels of pollution. As you descend there are layers of pink, purple, grey, brown, and more simply hanging meanacingly over the valley bowl. Take your local MP on a return trip: mind you, s/he probably could care less. huh.png

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Does anyone know whether Nan is just as smoky as Chiang Mai right now?

These are the numbers from the aqmthai.com website. PM10 in red (ug/m)^3.

a67. Municipality Nan. 2012-02-17. 8:00:00. 0.9. 9.0. 14.0. 02.01. 92.92.

Chiang Mai is current at: Quite a bump from earlier today. Appears the Nam station is not updated as often so it could be close to the CM numbers by now.

35t. City Hall. 2012-02-17. 16:00:00. 2.0. 43.2. 55.7. 0.3. 123.45.

If you hit the report tab & pull up the graph for pm10 at city hall, you get a peak of nearly 215(ug/m)^3 at 15.00 sad.png

Edited by MESmith
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Yes, the worst for a few years. Last year was not so bad because we had early rain. It is said that the hill people burn the forest carpet because it increases the volume of mushroom spores. True or not?

Also I understand that CMU has a project which is aimed at educating people not to burn - but judging by the current situation this looks like a forlorn task.

A few ye ars ago the Government tried to ban it and sent out spotter planes to try and catch people burning fields. So, what do they do? They burn at night time.

I think Last year the Chiang Mai ci ty hall said they would ban burning in the district but clearly these were empty words.

Finally, the problem in Thailand is that trying to stop people doing something is like trying to force them to put helmets on their heads when driving motorbikes.

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First burn season in Chaing Mai and today is the first time I've seen it like this. Is THIS what it's like through the whole burn season, or is today worse than normal?

Also, where are you guys getting the satellite burn images?

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Yes, the worst for a few years.

Right now is the worst it's been in years?

Right now is pretty much the way it was visually every year between 2004 and 2007, I spent the subsequent years in Phuket so can't comment on them.

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Yes, the worst for a few years.

Right now is the worst it's been in years?

Right now is pretty much the way it was visually every year between 2004 and 2007, I spent the subsequent years in Phuket so can't comment on them.

I would say it is about the worse for 'this time' of year, mid February, that I've seen in a very long time. About 4-5 years ago I believe, March had visibility you could measure in meters and a dusty brown air. Suspect this is not near the worse for this year.

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So, how high can this (ug/m)^3 go until evacuation would be in order?

Thailand or "the real world"?

Well, I was thinking CM, which is "the real world" at the moment. laugh.png

Edited by Semper
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Does anyone know whether Nan is just as smoky as Chiang Mai right now?

These are the numbers from the aqmthai.com website. PM10 in red (ug/m)^3.

a67. Municipality Nan. 2012-02-17. 8:00:00. 0.9. 9.0. 14.0. 02.01. 92.92.

Chiang Mai is current at: Quite a bump from earlier today. Appears the Nam station is not updated as often so it could be close to the CM numbers by now.

35t. City Hall. 2012-02-17. 16:00:00. 2.0. 43.2. 55.7. 0.3. 123.45.

thank you sir.jap.gif

Im heading to the islands

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Believe some info on what PM10 (10 microns or less) means is needed. There is also a push for a PM2.5 (2.5 microns) as it is believed to be significantly worse for health. To put the size into perspective, the human hair average is around 100-150 microns.

The PM-10 standard includes particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less (0.0004 inches or one-seventh the width of a human hair). EPA's health-based national air quality standard for PM-10 is 50 µg/m3 (measured as an annual mean) and 150 µg/m3 (measured as a daily concentration). Major concerns for human health from exposure to PM-10 include: effects on breathing and respiratory systems, damage to lung tissue, cancer, and premature death. The elderly, children, and people with chronic lung disease, influenza, or asthma, are especially sensitive to the effects of particulate matter. Acidic PM-10 can also damage human-made materials and is a major cause of reduced visibility in many parts of the U.S. New scientific studies suggest that fine particles (smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) may cause serious adverse health effects. As a result, EPA is considering setting a new standard for PM-2.5. In addition, EPA is reviewing whether revisions to the current PM-10 standards are warranted.

Source - EPA

Limits:

PM10 - 150ug/m^3 in a 24 hour period - Not to be exceeded more than once per year on average over 3 years.

Source - EPA

European Union Standard:

PM10 - 50ug/m^3 in 24 hour period for 35 times in a year.

Source EC Air Quality

Particulate Matter details

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Also, where are you guys getting the satellite burn images?

From this site > http://www.ehabich.info/

I followed a link from that site and found a fire mapper: http://firefly.geog.umd.edu/firemap/

You can see the country borders and zoom.

That's a great map, thanks, you can see once you zoom in that there's a shed load of fires to the North and West of us so my guess would be that CM itself is not the direct cause of the current problems.

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PM10 - 50ug/m^3 in 24 hour period for 35 times in a year.

This mean we are over the limit every year, no ?

European standards are not the same as Thailand standards as was pointed out in the initial post on this aspect.

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