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Had root canal + new crown, but tooth still hurts.


giddyup

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3 hours ago, dr_lucas said:

A relatively very low cost is a probable reason for him to come so recommended...

 

A rule of thumb  that most people don't know, proper root canal treatment must be done by a RC specialist using a microscope. especially in cases where the root is calcified, which happens more often than you'd imagine.

Only problem is that most places and RC specialists in Thailand don't have access to such expensive equipment and it is only available at a very few places including the well known private hospitals in Bangkok. They do impose quite a high surcharge for using the microscope and the time used.

 

Around 6 months ago I needed a RCT on a molar tooth with 3 roots and ended up researching this quite a lot.

I filtered out a lot of options until I finally cherry picked an amazing specialist from the Silom Dental Hospital: Dr.Pavena Chivatxavanakul D.D.S., Ph.D. http://www.silomdental.com/dentist_bangkok_thailand/endodontic_dentist.html

Luckily they regularly use the microscope and do not charge extra for using it at this clinic.

She was very dedicated and thorough and spent over 6 hours in total to clean my tooth' roots properly.

Important to note that this clinic is not cheap. I ended up paying 18,000 THB for the RCT alone, but you get what you pay for.

I then cherry picked another specialist from BIDC Dr. Tanawat Ritkajorn DDS., MSc., who studied at Chula and the University of Minnesota, USA (one of the world's best unis for dentistry, as listed on http://dental-schools.startclass.com/).

http://www.bangkokdentalcenter.com/thailanddentist/dentists_thailand.html

 

you obviously know your stuff and do not have achey teeth.

 

much as i hate the hight cost of dentistry i figure its better to pick a competent one rather than skimp and spend thousands more redoing it and attending to other complications.

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5 hours ago, giddyup said:

Yes, that must be it. All the dental work in Pattaya is sub-standard because it doesn't cost as much as BKK.

the only doctor i might trust in pattaya is a clap doctor….although I haven't needed to yet.

 

for half decent dentistry i would check out dr sunil clinic in prakhanong…the guys a joker and they spam you incessantly 

but they have 2 good RC specialists. all prices on website….never buy antibiotics from them….rest is fine.

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1 hour ago, JHolmesJr said:

 

you obviously know your stuff and do not have achey teeth.

 

much as i hate the hight cost of dentistry i figure its better to pick a competent one rather than skimp and spend thousands more redoing it and attending to other complications.

 

Thanks. :)

 

5 hours ago, dr_lucas said:

 

I then cherry picked another specialist from BIDC Dr. Tanawat Ritkajorn DDS., MSc., who studied at Chula and the University of Minnesota, USA (one of the world's best unis for dentistry, as listed on http://dental-schools.startclass.com/).

http://www.bangkokdentalcenter.com/thailanddentist/dentists_thailand.html

Forgot to mention that Dr. Tanawat is a crown specialist and he is the one who did my e.max crown.

 

According to this great article, e.max is indeed one of the recommended materials for the second molar teeth:http://www.dentaleconomics.com/articles/print/volume-104/issue-1/practice/zirconia-vs-lithium-disilicate.html

The materials are listed in decreasing order of my preference:

  1. Second molars -- gold alloy, PFM, full zirconia, lithium disilicate (IPS e.max)
  2. Mandibular first molars -- gold alloy, PFM, full zirconia, lithium disilicate
  3. Maxillary first molars -- PFM, lithium disilicate, full zirconia
  4. Premolars, maxillary and mandibular -- lithium disilicate, PFM, full zirconia (Fig. 7)
  5. Six maxillary or mandibular anterior teeth -- lithium disilicate
  6. One maxillary or mandibular anterior tooth with other teeth present -- leucite-reinforced glass (IPS Empress or others), lithium disilicate
Edited by dr_lucas
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On 4/13/2017 at 8:34 AM, dr_lucas said:

A relatively very low cost is a probable reason for him to come so recommended...

 

A rule of thumb  that most people don't know, proper root canal treatment must be done by a RC specialist using a microscope. especially in cases where the root is calcified, which happens more often than you'd imagine.

Only problem is that most places and RC specialists in Thailand don't have access to such expensive equipment and it is only available at a very few places including the well known private hospitals in Bangkok. They do impose quite a high surcharge for using the microscope and the time used.

 

Around 6 months ago I needed a RCT on a molar tooth with 3 roots and ended up researching this quite a lot.

I filtered out a lot of options until I finally cherry picked an amazing specialist from the Silom Dental Hospital: Dr.Pavena Chivatxavanakul D.D.S., Ph.D. http://www.silomdental.com/dentist_bangkok_thailand/endodontic_dentist.html

Luckily they regularly use the microscope and do not charge extra for using it at this clinic.

She was very dedicated and thorough and spent over 6 hours in total to clean my tooth' roots properly.

Important to note that this clinic is not cheap. I ended up paying 18,000 THB for the RCT alone, but you get what you pay for.

I then cherry picked another specialist from BIDC Dr. Tanawat Ritkajorn DDS., MSc., who studied at Chula and the University of Minnesota, USA (one of the world's best unis for dentistry, as listed on http://dental-schools.startclass.com/).

http://www.bangkokdentalcenter.com/thailanddentist/dentists_thailand.html

Did the RC specialist advice you to wait for up to a year before the crown, or is that only if there is pain after RCT.

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5 hours ago, brling said:

Did the RC specialist advice you to wait for up to a year before the crown, or is that only if there is pain after RCT.

Generally it's highly highly recommended to put a crown as early as possible after the RCT, normally after 1 week, not more, because the longer it the time, the higher the chances are that the tooth will get infected or damaged further.

I am not sure what's the case when there is still pain for an extended time (over a few days) after the RCT is properly done.

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