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Bangkok to add 10 road cameras in bid to cut speeding deaths


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Bangkok to add 10 road cameras in bid to cut speeding deaths

By The Nation

 

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Bangkok will install 10 new speed cameras as parts of its participation in the Bloomberg Philanthropies Partnership for Healthy Cities.

 

The Thai capital and 53 other cities in the world have pledged under the partnership to enact one of 10 proven policies identified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as effective in protecting people from exposure to non-communicable diseases and injury risk factors. 

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration has decided to install 10 new speed cameras in three accident-prone areas. 

 

They are Lat Krabang district at Chalongkrung Road and Chalong Krung soi 33 (in both directions); Lat Krabang district at Romklao Road and Rom Klao soi 50 (both directions); and Pravet district at Chaloem Phrakiat Ratchakan Tee Kao Road and Chaloem Phrakiat Ratchakan Tee Kao soi 12 (both directions).

 

Thailand’s roads are the second deadliest in the world, according to the 2015 Global Status Report on Road Safety published by WHO. The report found that 83 per cent of traffic crash deaths in Thailand involve the most vulnerable road users – pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists -– much higher than the global average of 49 per cent.

 

Early findings from traffic data collected by the Partnership-supported cameras showed that one in five motorcyclists drives above the speed limit. 

 

“Since 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies has partnered with the City of Bangkok on road safety,” said Kelly Larson, lead for the philanthropy’s Initiative for Global Road Safety and the Partnership for Healthy Cities.

 

“They have shown an outstanding commitment to reducing road traffic fatalities throughout the city and these new speed cameras are an additional strategy to reduce road crashes. We look forward to our continued collaboration and utilising data gleaned from these cameras to make roads safer for all road users.”

 

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Said Ariella Rojhani, director of the Partnership for Healthy Cities at Vital Strategies: “Speeding is one of the main risk factors for traffic injuries and fatalities around the world. The city’s decision to deploy the latest technology to measure this problem complements other road safety efforts, such as campaigns to encourage helmet use and reduce drink driving. We applaud the data-driven approach of the city’s partnership [on the] speeding initiative, which has the potential to save many lives.”

 

Through the partnership, cities work alongside Bloomberg Philanthropies, WHO and the implementing partner Vital Strategies to deploy solutions aimed to save lives and improve the environments where people live, work and play.

 

Bangkok will use the newly installed cameras to measure precisely which vehicles are speeding and by how much, among other data. This information will help inform road safety policy, communication campaigns and infrastructure redesign. The cameras will also be used to support speeding laws.

 

Some 44 million people are killed around the world yearly by injuries, including those caused by road-traffic crashes, as well as by non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases. Together, they are responsible for almost 80 per cent of global deaths, according to the WHO.

 

With the majority of the world’s population now living in urban settings, cities are uniquely positioned to transform the fight against diseases and injuries by implementing policies to significantly reduce exposure to risk factors, said a Partnership press release.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30352892

 

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-08-26

 

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Given that cameras in Thailand mysteriously stop working anytime an important person is involved in any mishap, what would be the point in installing ten more?

 

Perhaps a more effective policy by the BIB would be to have a list of poor people ready to be picked up and blamed if/as needed for any accident?

 

 

 

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35 minutes ago, rooster59 said:

The Thai capital and 53 other cities in the world have pledged under the partnership to enact one of 10 proven policies identified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as effective in protecting people from exposure to non-communicable diseases and injury risk factors

I think a more effective idea would be Article 44 to ban traffic jams, followed by the cancelling of most driving licences.

Next week: How to nail jelly to the ceiling.

 

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when you have drivers that believe that karma causes accidents then you have drivers that do not think their own behavior influences outcomes; then you have awful driving and excessive accidents

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Ten ?    That will cover one small stretch of road then.   What about all the other roads around the country that claim lives on a daily basis ?

 

Ah; nearly forgot that only Bangkok lives matter and that the rest of the country doesn't exist !

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Essentially it is a road tax - if you want to speed, you pay the fine.

A deterrent to speeding?  Don't make me laugh!!!  And oh, by the way, at mile markers nnn, nnn, nnn, nnn, nnn, and nnn - look for overhead cameras and radar guns attached to overhead utility structures. 
"Note to self, slow down at the following mile markers....." 
You can't make this comedy up!  :clap2:

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22 minutes ago, connda said:

Essentially it is a road tax - if you want to speed, you pay the fine.

A deterrent to speeding?  Don't make me laugh!!!  

 

Works for me.  I don't speed because it just adds too much stress to a drive, wondering whether there's a cop with radar behind that next sign, around that next curve, or in that unmarked car coming the other direction.  Of course, traffic fines, license points and the increase in auto insurance rates that follow a ticket are much more onerous back home.

 

Enforcement and the probability of negative consequences are about the only thing guaranteed to modify human behavior. 

 

It's not a road tax.  It's a tax on irresponsible behavior.

 

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Got hit with a 500 baht speed camera ticket on the 101 heading north of Phrae recently, 98 in a 90 zone. I didn't realize they did actually have any and in fact I told the Thai wife that beforehand when I saw a camera sign. She's been kind enough to not mention that.

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when will the retards  learn that speeding ISNT the real issue its  pure total 100% crap driving, 100% lack of concentration and only one thing will fix  that and its  going to take years and years if  ever

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7 hours ago, bluesofa said:

I think a more effective idea would be Article 44 to ban traffic jams, followed by the cancelling of most driving licences.

Next week: How to nail jelly to the ceiling.

 

 

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Just looking at London traffic enforcement cameras and speed cameras.there must be thousands and probably 5 a day new ones.i don't know what percentage pay their fines but it's probably in the 90% as the long arm of the law always catches the man in the uk.here cameras and actually getting the fines paid is totally a different ball game.

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They haven't got a clue on how to reduce accidents and to get people follow the traffic rules.

 

Now I see more and more of these un-interrupted white lines, which you cannot cross to keep people drive in their lanes, BUT since they haven't got a clue on how effectively use this, they just paint these un-interrupted line wherever they think it's ok. And this will give problems, since I already saw on several roads, they created these lines in such way that if you actually follow these lines and don't cross them, you CANNOT use the EXIT that you would like to use to exit the elevated roads, unless you start to drive on the left lane about 5km before you want to exit. It's totally ridicilous. They really have no clue what the h..l they are doing!

 

10 extra camera's??? :cheesy: And this is actually news?

 

If they start to install about 50.000 camera's throughout the country AND following up to let people pay the fines (which should be raised a tenfold to make impact), by connecting all the databases of car-registration, tax-payment, insurance etc., then and only then it will start to make a difference.

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7 minutes ago, Blue bruce said:

I have  great idea, why not hire 10 motorcycle police to patrol the roads instead of cameras. 

Even allowing for the inevitable lack of maintenance of the cameras, they're more reliable than one RTP officer, let alone ten.

 

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11 hours ago, BoganInParasite said:

Got hit with a 500 baht speed camera ticket on the 101 heading north of Phrae recently, 98 in a 90 zone. I didn't realize they did actually have any and in fact I told the Thai wife that beforehand when I saw a camera sign. She's been kind enough to not mention that.

Yes they have them and they use them, a few years ago ticket heading to Bangkok around Lop Buri no biggy 

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6 hours ago, yrag said:

They really need them here in Bang Saray, Sukenvit Rd.....speedway every evening and night

This is on a stretch of road that has claimed over thirty lives in the time I have lived there.  Sattahip's response? I once saw a uniformed man holding a camera hiding behind a portrait of the King.

Speed cameras only work if fines are paid.  Here 92% of fines are ignored with impunity.

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