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Emergency Declared As Cold Wave Hits Northern Thai Provinces


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Emergency declared as cold wave hits northern Thai provinces

CHIANG MAI: -- Thailand's lower northern province of Uttaradit declared nine districts 'cold spell disaster zones' while the authorities in Chiang Mai distributed warm clothing to residents affected by the unusually cold weather.

Uttaradit governor Thawatchai Fangangkul said the current cold wave is the worst in ten years with average temperatures at 6-8 degrees Celcius. The province declared nine districts the cold spell disaster zones to seek budget to help villagers.

Meanwhile, the disaster prevention and response center in Chiang Mai province further north on Thursday began distributing winter clothing and blankets in 14 districts.

Prajon Pratsakul, an official of Chiang Mai's Disaster Prevention and Mitigation Centre said the temperature in the province has hovered around 11 degrees Celcius for two days and the minimum temperature on local mountaintops was recorded at two degrees Celcius, the lowest in the past year.

The office was given a budget of Bt26 million to provide 70,000 blankets and 40,000 winter jackets for local residents. It earlier distributed 291,114 winter items to help 64 per cent of locals affected by the cold spell.

The unusual cold weather can cause illness related to respiratory system and blood circulation particularly the elderly, said Asst.Prof. Dr. Wattana Nawacharoen, director of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital.

-- TNA 2009-01-15

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Sukothai declared disastrous area for cold weather hazard

Nothern Sukhothai province's all nine district has been declared disastrous areas affected by cold weather hazard, while relevant stuffs, including blankets, have been prepared to be distributed to the victims.

Northern Sukothai province governor Mr. Yothin Samutkiri (โยธินศร์ สมุทรคีรีจ์) disclosed today (January 15) that the province's Meteorological Office reported influence of rather high air pressure was dominating the upper part of Thailand. It has caused cold weather with less than 15 degree celcius temperatur in Sukothai province.

At the moment, the province has declared its whole nine districts as disastrous areas affected by cold weather hazard.

In addition, Sukothai provincial officials have set up a specific centre to solve cold weather danger. All levels of the province's administration organizations have prepared blankets for all victims.

Source: National News Bureau of Thailand - 15 January 2009

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Social Development Minister urges public to help cold weather's victims

The Minister of Social Development and Human Security urged all factions in the society to jointly distribute blankets to help cold weather's victims nationwide.

Minister of Social Development and Human Security Mr. Witoon Nambutr (วิฑูรย์ นามบุตร) led a group of his ministry’s officials to distribute 2,000 blankets to cold weather's victims in Det Udom (เดชอุดม) district and other 4,000 blankets in Warin Chamrap (วารินชำราบ) district in northeastern Ubon Ratchatani province.

He said the distribution was preliminary relieving to the victims. At the moment, only 100,000 blankets were available to the victims nationwide which was insufficient. He asked all factions in Thai society, including state and private sectors as well as general public to give out more blankets to help the victims.

Source: National News Bureau of Thailand - 15 January 2009

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This "declaration of emergency" is purely and simply a scam to siphon off a bunch of money.

I live in the north (20 years) and yes it is chilly, but no way does it require 40,000 blankets and close to 300,000 winter items.

Don't people (Thai citizens) have some responsibility to take care of themselves and thier families.

I mean it is not as if it is something unexpected, i.e it does get cold every year (admittedly it has been cool this year)

It's not exactly like a flood or a tsunami (is it)

Edited by john b good
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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

Correct. I haven't lived here for 20 years, but I have been in villages in far northern districts at this time of year and it has been bitter cold both in Mae Hong Son and Chiang Rai (particularly in the mountains) - and that's how it felt to me coming from the UK. When you see Thai in Chiang Mai (city) rushing to find scarves, hats and thick jackets at times when some of us farang are still strolling around in shirtsleeves - that's when you realise the difference just a few degrees make to those not used to it.

I suspect the "declaration of emergency" is a technical means to release centrally-held funds and supplies that would not be authorised otherwise - same as the US president declaring a state a disaster area to enable application of federal assistance.

So, no - it's not like a flood or tsunami......... but extreme (in Thai terms) weather is still something that most are not prepared for.

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

In our village in Buri Ram blankets get handed out to the elderly every year, and then thrown aside when the weather warms up. By the time the next cold season comes around they are full of dirt and half eaten by insects. I visited our local district hospital last night, all the wards are full, and beds are lined up in every corridor and open area, some people are lying on mattresses on the floor. I saw an awful lot of monks there, they must really suffer in the cold.

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

What you say is correct

We live in Loei but I am now working near Pattaya and my wife handed out about a hundred blankets on our last visit donated by friends (Thai) around the pattaya area also shoes for the oldere generation.

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

.

In our village in Buri Ram blankets get handed out to the elderly every year, and then thrown aside when the weather warms up.

Is it unkind to wonder why people prefer not to store them for the next inevitable cold spell? Or do these emergency supplies maybe have some resale value?

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

In our village in Buri Ram blankets get handed out to the elderly every year, and then thrown aside when the weather warms up. By the time the next cold season comes around they are full of dirt and half eaten by insects. I visited our local district hospital last night, all the wards are full, and beds are lined up in every corridor and open area, some people are lying on mattresses on the floor. I saw an awful lot of monks there, they must really suffer in the cold.

My fiance' was complaining about the 14degrees she just endured in her home of Bung Bun, good luck she's back in BKK :o

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Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

.

In our village in Buri Ram blankets get handed out to the elderly every year, and then thrown aside when the weather warms up.

Is it unkind to wonder why people prefer not to store them for the next inevitable cold spell? Or do these emergency supplies maybe have some resale value?

You r right ... could the blankets be returned to the proper authorities for safe keeping and then be cleaned up and distributed again for next winter (as it seems people r more careless taking good care of donations)... is it not time to try saving a little !

Lived in the north for the last 20 years ... it is cold every year (this year is not the coldest) ... nothern people should be prepared for winter, right ...

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Mercury on Don Inthanon drops to 1.5 C Friday morning

Chiang Mai - Tourists visiting Doi Inthanon Friday morning was treated with frost, which has been happening for three consecutive days.

Kriangsak Thanomphan, chief of Doi Inthanon National Park, said about 3,000 tourists visited the mountaintop Friday morning and were treated with a spectacular scene of white frost.

He said the grass minimum temperature on the mount was -3 C degree for three consecutive days in the morning.

The normal temperature on Doi Inthanon was measured at 1.5 C Friday morning he said.

Source: The Nation - 16 January 2009

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Farang or not farang if you live here and get used to the tropical weather long enough, merely 20 degree is way too cold man. 

Afaik, blankets and stuff gets handed out most every year up north?

Others can fill in more info.

While I agree that people shouldn't be surprised and cannot validate the need for emergency help as I don't have a clear picture of recipient of the help and their situation. So I will wait with comments on the help itself for future posts.

Correct. I haven't lived here for 20 years, but I have been in villages in far northern districts at this time of year and it has been bitter cold both in Mae Hong Son and Chiang Rai (particularly in the mountains) - and that's how it felt to me coming from the UK. When you see Thai in Chiang Mai (city) rushing to find scarves, hats and thick jackets at times when some of us farang are still strolling around in shirtsleeves - that's when you realise the difference just a few degrees make to those not used to it.

I suspect the "declaration of emergency" is a technical means to release centrally-held funds and supplies that would not be authorised otherwise - same as the US president declaring a state a disaster area to enable application of federal assistance.

So, no - it's not like a flood or tsunami......... but extreme (in Thai terms) weather is still something that most are not prepared for.

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Farang or not farang if you live here and get used to the tropical weather long enough, merely 20 degree is way too cold man. 

Maybe for some, but I've lived in Asia for most of the last 10 years and I love sub-20 °C temperatures. I've never become acclimatized to the hot Asian weather.

I eagerly await the cooler weather in Dec/Jan. Last year I was most disappointed when the cooler temps didn't arrive in Pattaya.

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I am all for planning, reuse of blankets, etc, but the youngsters probably outgrew last years coat, the blankets that are given out probably leave a lot to be desired on thickness, quality and thus warmth so 1 years usage is probably about right, as I have seen the blankets used as additional cover over the jackets they have. The people in Chiang Mai are noting the cold weather so those people up in the hills/mountains will really be hurting with the cold. Zero is not a real common temp. even in the mountains so help if you can but try to put yourself in the same position as the people who need help.

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I am all for planning, reuse of blankets, etc, but the youngsters probably outgrew last years coat, the blankets that are given out probably leave a lot to be desired on thickness, quality and thus warmth so 1 years usage is probably about right, as I have seen the blankets used as additional cover over the jackets they have. The people in Chiang Mai are noting the cold weather so those people up in the hills/mountains will really be hurting with the cold. Zero is not a real common temp. even in the mountains so help if you can but try to put yourself in the same position as the people who need help.

I had my winter clothing for many years , stored them and blankets in plastic bags between seasons , god knows there are a zillion plastic bags going to waste in Thailand at any given time . We used to have boxes of 'Pass around ' clothing in our area which kept many well clothed all year round , OH , but I forgot , Thai do not like or are unaccustomed to using used items , would be a good time to start methinks !!!!!

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My wife spent many hours visiting the second hand clothing stores when we were last in US. She found heavy winter coats, vests,gloves, hats etc, must have boxed up enough for 25 to 30 people and brought back on our return. I had doubts about the acceptance but it was like xmas time in the village when she went to pass them out. When her father passed away, several local men asked for his heavy coats and vests for their use. She will point out some of the clothing still being worn by family and friends (5 years later). When she told the locals about the Goodwill, Salvation army stores, etc, cheap prices, different items , etc they just could not comprehend it. Granted these are farm people so they may have a different mind set compared to city folks, but second hand clothing was most welcome and they do seem to care for what they are given.

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Bangkok Post, 17/01/2009 at 12:00 AM

Ref url:- http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/local/9870...ntinue-into-feb

THE BIG FREEZE

Cold spell expected to continue into Feb

A cold spell which blew in from China last weekend will grip all regions until next month, but the weather will gradually become warmer by the end of the week.

Somchai Baimuang, director of the Meteorological Department's weather forecast bureau, said temperatures in all regions have plunged in recent days due to a high pressure system from China which has extended its ridge over Thailand.

The cold weather will last until next month, but temperatures will rise one or two degrees Celsius starting from this weekend, he said.

The average temperature in many areas would be 20 degrees Celsius.

In Bangkok, the lowest temperature was measured at 14.7 degrees Celsius at Don Mueang airport on Jan 11. It was the lowest temperature recorded in the capital in 10 years.

Bangkok experienced its lowest temperature of 9.9 degrees Celsius in 1955.

Temperatures in several provinces plunged to record lows.

In northeastern Nakhon Phanom province, the lowest temperature was measured at 4.2 degrees Celsius on Jan 11, beating the previous record low of 4.5 degrees on Jan 30, 1983.

In central Pathum Thani province, the lowest temperature was 14.5 degrees on Jan 12, lower than the lowest record of 15.6 on Jan 3, 1999.

In southern Krabi, the lowest temperature was measured at 15.3 degrees on Jan 11 against the previous record of 17.9 degrees on Jan 8, 1994.

Chilly weather has so far caused damage to at least 150,000 rai of paddy fields in Phitsanulok province.

Kasem Phetkor, a farmer in tambon Wang Pikul of Wang Thong district, said about 100 rai of his rice field was damaged as humidity from heavy dew had caused an outbreak of the ragged stunt virus that disrupts rice growth.

A survey found about 20,000 rai of paddy fields in tambon Wang Pikul alone had been damaged by the cold weather.

In the entire province, at least 150,000 rai of paddy had been damaged.

Local agricultural officials yesterday warned farmers to take extra care of their fields as low temperatures would cause the spread of rice diseases.

If the cold spell dragged on, rice productivity in Phitsanulok province was expected to be reduced by 30-40%.

Unquote

It,s very cold by Thai standards here in Udonthani, feels colder than before, but the wife says it,s the same.

marshbags :o

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