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Water Pump - Might Need One - Tank As Well ?


torrenova

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Every house I've had here has had a pump and a tank except the last two and this one the missus has bought is suffering from the rapid expansion of other houses in the village surroundings. This will only increase and put more pressure on the water pressure.

So, do I need a pump and if so, do I need a tank ? There has never been an issue with lack of water as we had in Pattaya but the pressure is decreasing and that is screwing up the shower which cuts out as the pressure decreases.

Just a simple bathroom and kitchen on the ground level. Just need to increase pressure I think.

Any ideas most welcome.

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I think you have answered your own question by saying the water pressure/volume has been decreasing.

You have my vote for a minimum 1000 liter tank and at least a 150 watt Mitsu or Hitachi pump and of course the associated piping. Depending on where you are located this can be done for about 15,000 baht or less

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Yup ^^^

Don't pump direct from the supply (in most countries this is illegal anyway). Supply => Tank => Pump is the correct way.

If your pressure is ok sometimes then a bypass with a 1 way valve will save on pump wear and power costs, it will also ensure you have at least some pressure if the power is off.

Ensure you fit isolating valves so you can service the pump without dumping 1000L of stored water all over.

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If this house is near Buriram I suggest you go in person and sit down with the owner of the "Pump Shop" on Sunthong Thep Road that is about 2 blocks from the Bangkok Bank main Branch. This BUSY tool and pump shop has a large POLICE HAT where an officer might sit. It is about 3 blocks away from Pizza Company and Big Bikes.

The owner of this shop UNDERSTANDS and can speak English. He can send a competent, experienced staff person to your home at no charge and no obligation to see your situation and draw out some suggestions. The staff person will not speak or understand English so have your wife translate. Then if you sit down again with the shop owner again he can give you options that include GUARANTEED installation. His price will be lower than Home Mart, Mega Home Mart, Home Pro, etc.. for the brand and model of pump for your specific needs. He carries some nice tanks at the lowest price. His staff will do a great job INSTALLING and testing the system and then you pay when they are done. If you need follow up service he will give you his personal mobile phone number and he has sent a repair person to our home on 40 minutes notice. This shop has consistently had the lowest price and a real one year guarantee on any power tools I purchased. They have a warehouse nearby full of water tanks as they supply (and service) the Village Water systems to a wide area, not just Buriram Province. Many shops give you a "run around" on after sales service, but this shop is 100% professional. You can also get a fair price on water filtering options.

post-20604-1235320748_thumb.jpg

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Another question on the same lines please

I've seen circular tanks that look approximately a meter across and about a 1 .5 high.

When full, will these tanks (outlet from base)push water through a small household pipe into a shower.....even if the shower is say 1 meter above the tank top level.

The tank would be filled from a bore....would this require a filter as the current input looks very clean for washing

Any thoughts would be appreciated

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So is this the way the thing works / should work ?

1) water comes from the supply through the meter

2) then goes through a filter of some sort

3) then goes into tank

4) pump draws from tank

I think the house I had in Pattaya had the ability to draw direct from the main when the pressure was ok and only used the tank if not. I cannot remember the pipe layout. Not sure though.

I don't need to get a world class solution but a manageable one. We're only going to be here some months a year but I can see the problem increasing.

As for cost, pumps seem to run from around 4k or so. Tanks perhaps a few k more (not sure how much). Piping and labour should be virtually nothing (from experience of plumbers).

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Another question on the same lines please

I've seen circular tanks that look approximately a meter across and about a 1 .5 high.

When full, will these tanks (outlet from base)push water through a small household pipe into a shower.....even if the shower is say 1 meter above the tank top level.

The tank would be filled from a bore....would this require a filter as the current input looks very clean for washing

Any thoughts would be appreciated

that belongs to science fiction! :o

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Get a 2000 liter tank thats the size most water pick up trucks have on them so if the supply gets as bad as pattaya ie no water or water for only a few hours a day and you run dry your not wasting money when you have to buy in water off a truck.

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Jeez,

Water goes downhill, the more downhill you have the more pressure you have...if you dont have much downhill get a pressure pump. Bloody easy when you think about it!

Not exactly. Water will flow under gravity from it's source but if that source is higher than your house's point of entry (village water tower for instance) then it will flow "up hill" inside your house.

Maybe I did not make myself clear. I don't care where the water comes from, only from the point of entry to my property after the meter. To install a tank and pump, what is the correct pipework, non return valves, pre and post tank etc. I guess it could be easy for some of us to not know that and Somchai will just do whatever he thinks is best most of the time. I'd rather get someone who actually does know to tell me so I can set it up or have it done right.

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Here you go :o

post-14979-1235523355_thumb.jpg

Pressure tank is often part of the pump.

Non-return valve allows city water pressure if the power is off. If the city pressure is higher than the pump setting then you'll get city all the time and the pump will only run when the pressure drops.

Pump valves isolate the pump for maintenance.

Edited by Crossy
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Here you go :D

post-14979-1235523355_thumb.jpg

Pressure tank is often part of the pump.

Non-return valve allows city water pressure if the power is off. If the city pressure is higher than the pump setting then you'll get city all the time and the pump will only run when the pressure drops.

Pump valves isolate the pump for maintenance.

Cheers Crossy.

I guess that is what I had before. We also had some filter after the meter as sometimes there was loads of soil and crap in the water (imagine washing the baby's things and getting them out to find they were covered in crap :o - not a happy bunny). I never saw a pressure thing though, unless that is part of those pump things which are about 3/4 metre tall and about 40cm diameter. I know we never have had anything other than a tank and a pump.

For sure I'd need something like your diagram as Somchai wuld probably just miss out the tank or something or put floating lillies in it !

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I guess that is what I had before. We also had some filter after the meter as sometimes there was loads of soil and crap in the water (imagine washing the baby's things and getting them out to find they were covered in crap :o - not a happy bunny). I never saw a pressure thing though, unless that is part of those pump things which are about 3/4 metre tall and about 40cm diameter. I know we never have had anything other than a tank and a pump.

For sure I'd need something like your diagram as Somchai wuld probably just miss out the tank or something or put floating lillies in it !

Yeh. Put a particulate filter on your incoming supply to keep the really crunchy bits out of the tank, you can use a finer one on your washing machine inlet if needed.

The pressure tank often lives under the pump motor in the package units with nice covers etc. looks a bit like a mini gas cylinder. It ensures that there is a reservoir of pressure so you get water as soon as you turn on the tap. It will also allow you to draw water (for a cuppa) without the pump firing up. You can see the tank under the motor in this piccie of a rather knackered looking Mitsubishi:-

post-14979-1235609045_thumb.jpg

Edited by Crossy
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Torrenova,

I think you were given a strong recommendation from kamalabob2 in a post above about seeking out the water/pump shop in your area of Buriram. It seems kamala has done his homework on this and many other things during his build and I would take his advice and go talk to this shop. You have nothing to lose and a lot to gain.

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Crossy.

My (late) Danish friend installed a sophisticated pipework like your diagram. Lots of non return valves with bypass in case electricity goes out.

Yes the system pictured above has everything including a reverse flush for his filters. One of the nicest I have ever seen.

Where I live the supply is only disrupted for a few hours if ever so my 750 liter tank is fine - holds 2 to 3 days supply for us.

In 20 years I have never had to buy water from a truck. That's in Suk 101/1 however. I'm sure the provinces are different.

Trust me when I say that metro water supply in BKK will not run a shower. You are lucky to get 5 psi which fills your storage tanks.

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Torrenova. Some people build underground storage water tanks (rectangular) out of concrete.

Not the ideal soultion (which is sandstone like Kamalabob has) but it gets the job done. Advantages are it will fill up when a horizontal will not.

I use a 350 watt pump at my condo which is just barely adequate. Start pressure 1.8 kg/cm2 stop pressure 2.8 kg/cm2

Instead of that metal tank that crossy shows this one uses a bladder (plastic) which can never rust.

WalrusPump350watt05Sept2008003_s.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...
If this house is near Buriram I suggest you go in person and sit down with the owner of the "Pump Shop" on Sunthong Thep Road that is about 2 blocks from the Bangkok Bank main Branch. This BUSY tool and pump shop has a large POLICE HAT where an officer might sit. It is about 3 blocks away from Pizza Company and Big Bikes.

The owner of this shop UNDERSTANDS and can speak English. He can send a competent, experienced staff person to your home at no charge and no obligation to see your situation and draw out some suggestions. The staff person will not speak or understand English so have your wife translate. Then if you sit down again with the shop owner again he can give you options that include GUARANTEED installation. His price will be lower than Home Mart, Mega Home Mart, Home Pro, etc.. for the brand and model of pump for your specific needs. He carries some nice tanks at the lowest price. His staff will do a great job INSTALLING and testing the system and then you pay when they are done. If you need follow up service he will give you his personal mobile phone number and he has sent a repair person to our home on 40 minutes notice. This shop has consistently had the lowest price and a real one year guarantee on any power tools I purchased. They have a warehouse nearby full of water tanks as they supply (and service) the Village Water systems to a wide area, not just Buriram Province. Many shops give you a "run around" on after sales service, but this shop is 100% professional. You can also get a fair price on water filtering options.

We live about 200km from Buriram (Chaiyaphum province) and I'm wondering if anyone knows of a similar vendor in Khorat or Chaiyaphum, OR will the Buriram vendor make the trip? Is there a telephone number I can call? I am contemplating a system with an input filter, 2000Liter tank, Mitsubishi (305Q2)pump, and pressure tank...all connected like the schematic elsewhere in this forum.

The first-pass quote I received from a shop in Khorat has given me pause, so I want to check around for alternatives for comparrison.

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

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This morning I phoned "Pi Chai" the owner of "Ruang Sang Thai" Pump and Tool shop in Buriram at his mobile number 089-844-9680. The store number is 044--611041

He said he DOES sell and service in most areas of CHAIYAPHUM Province. My wife had said earlier that a delivery truck that dropped off a tool at our home was on the way to Roi-Et so it would seem this firm sells and services in a wide area around Buriram.

In our case I thought it was well worth the time we spent at HIS SHOP discussing in ENGLISH the options for our water tanks/pumps/filters, having the time to check prices at a couple of other shops and then come back to place the order and confirm an installation date.

Another great thing about the 500 liter pressure tank is that we still have enough water pressure on the 2nd floor for a shower if the electricity goes out (cold shower).

post-20604-1238120855_thumb.jpg

post-20604-1238120893_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...
This morning I phoned "Pi Chai" the owner of "Ruang Sang Thai" Pump and Tool shop in Buriram at his mobile number 089-844-9680. The store number is 044--611041

(

I will be in Chiang Rai soon at my fiance house where we have a huge water issue, or just simply no water at all after about a minute, then it is usally touch and go during the day and returns somewhat during the evening. I spoke to "Pi Chai" who had ideas on how to resolve , however I was not aware of the distance from him to us prior to speaking with him (not sure how i missed reading prior in Bangkok). He advised he will see about getting me a contact of a local or two. I was wondering if anyone else , had someone they could recommend as well in the Chiang Rai area. Thank you in advance...

Would I be correct in assuming. I would need a setup similiar to. Also would like hot water please fill in design if I am missing anything. In addition, Is tank drain for overflow. I was thinking of having this done prior to arriving, should I wait until I arrive to see done correctly? Also do they have antiscold shower valves availabe in thailand.

{ Outside }

main line[water meter]>water tank [2000 litre]>water pump>filter>

Edited by Newguy70
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Would I be correct in assuming. I would need a setup similiar to. Also would like hot water please fill in design if I am missing anything. In addition, Is tank drain for overflow. I was thinking of having this done prior to arriving, should I wait until I arrive to see done correctly? Also do they have antiscold shower valves availabe in thailand.

{Outside} main line[water meter]>water tank [2000 litre]>water pump>filter>

I've not seen thermostatic mixers here (what you call anti-scald) doesn't mean they're not available. Most people use point of use heaters, the better ones have proper temperature regulation systems set an outlet temperature and it stays that way no matter what the flow until the heater runs out of power (then the water gets colder).

I would add a coarse particulate filter between your meter and the tank inlet, just to keep the really crispy bits out of the tank :o

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I would add a coarse particulate filter between your meter and the tank inlet, just to keep the really crispy bits out of the tank :o

Hi Crossy,

I will probaly bring an anti scold with me, cheap here in the states

I appreciate the heads up on the (coarse particulate filter) I am sure that it will add to the longevity of the equipment.

Does this (setup below) look correct ?

{Outside} main line[water meter]>coarse particulate filter>water tank [2000 litre]>water pump>filter>[shower line, sink line etc]

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Does this (setup below) look correct ?

{Outside} main line[water meter]>coarse particulate filter>water tank [2000 litre]>water pump>filter>[shower line, sink line etc]

Looks good to me :o

Don't forget to include valves so you can isolate and remove the pump without your 2000L of water pissing all over the ground :D

You may also wish to include a one-way valve to bypass the whole shebang, at least you will have city water pressure (what little there is) if you have no pump power.

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Unless you have better water pressure than most places I would put the filter after the storage tank (if above ground). That way you can use the pressure from tank to back flush filter (it needs to be cleaned occasionally). And the intake water does not have to be pushed through a filter (it may never make it). If you have to have tank trucks deliver water it will still be filtered this way.

Our upcountry home has the filters on output of pump so have full pressure to overcome the filter resistance and to clean them. This has been working fine for many years and appears to be the recommended set up by filter companies.

Edited by lopburi3
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Unless you have better water pressure than most places I would put the filter after the storage tank (if above ground).

Hmmm, we have a slight difference of opinion here :o

I'm advocating a COARSE inlet filter just to keep most of the grit out of the tank (to avoid having the clean the tank out).

Fine filter as you suggest on the pump output.

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Does this (setup below) look correct ?

{Outside} main line[water meter]>coarse particulate filter>water tank [2000 litre]>water pump>filter>[shower line, sink line etc]

Looks good to me :o

Don't forget to include valves so you can isolate and remove the pump without your 2000L of water pissing all over the ground :D

You may also wish to include a one-way valve to bypass the whole shebang, at least you will have city water pressure (what little there is) if you have no pump power.

Interesting story. I designed my own piping diagram, bought all the fittings but left it to my builders to put it all together as i went away for the weekend.

When i came back, they had it finished and had big smiles on their faces because they saved me money: They didn't install any of the valves.

They said i didn't need them and could take them back for a refund.

I said, what about when something breaks and i need to shut off the tank? They just smiled bigger and said Mai Penrai!

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I'm advocating a COARSE inlet filter just to keep most of the grit out of the tank (to avoid having the clean the tank out).

But that will soon become muck if not cleaned and have to be replaced. SS tanks have outlet on center of bottom to drain and are very easy to clean. If not that type you send the kids in. :o Most well water upcountry is going to be very mineral rich and you are likely to want to filter as much as you can (or be prepared to replace tile/porcelain on a regular basis).

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But that will soon become muck if not cleaned and have to be replaced. SS tanks have outlet on center of bottom to drain and are very easy to clean. If not that type you send the kids in. :D Most well water upcountry is going to be very mineral rich and you are likely to want to filter as much as you can (or be prepared to replace tile/porcelain on a regular basis).

See where you're coming from mate. He's on city water, but if it clogs badly he can always leave the filter element out and send the kids into the tank :o

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