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Denied entry at Krabi airport...


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Yesterday I arrived at Krabi on an AirAsia flight from KL. The immigration officer looked through my passport and found three consecutive 30-day Thai entry stamps and announced "you can't enter."

Note, three consecutive visas, not 100, not 20, just three. And each one had a gap of a few days spent in KL.

The point of this story is that it doesn't matter a bag of beans whether or not you think you have a valid reason for making these trips ... if you have the chops in your passport you will be denied entry.

Anything I tried to say was totally ignored. They have their rules to deny entry, and nothing will change their minds.

Luckily for me I had a trump card, which I decided to play once it became 100% clear I was not getting in. I have two nationalities and hence two passports. So when I politely asked "If I use this passport may I enter?" they quickly flipped through it and said "Yes, no problem."

Of course, it served their purpose as much as mine. No doubt they had to fill out reams of paperwork to deport me, and so here I was, presenting them with an instant solution. Suddenly it was all smiles, chop, chop, and I was on my way.

As I say, the moral is, Immigration is not interested in reasons, excuses or pleas. Three strikes and you're out. Or not in.


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it will be interesting if any other people with just basic back to back 30 days has an issue. Say just a casual tourist that ended up with a few more months of time off than expected. I have never done two back to back visa runs once in my 10 years of visiting thailand. Once I did a 7-day extension at the local immigration office in Jomtien, then made a van visa run after that.

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Krabi is in the South so nothing surprises me that happens there. Just look at what is going on at the border crossings there.

The problem is that immigration headquarters does not seem to of clarified what is needed to all the various entry points yet so they are doing what they want to do.

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Multiply this by hundreds of times on International flights landing at Swampy... coming soon. And 99% of those denied will not have a second passport. Fireworks ... when being totally denied after flying 16,000 kilometers. !!!!

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it will be interesting if any other people with just basic back to back 30 days has an issue. Say just a casual tourist that ended up with a few more months of time off than expected.

Yes, I think if they continue to apply the rule so rigidly it will eventually hurt tourism.

They asked me no questions. They had no interest in why I wanted to enter Thailand, whether I had a hotel reservation, onward or return tickets, money, nothing. You have three chops, you can't come back. End of story.

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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

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Just to clarify, you say "a few days" in KL between back to back to back. How many exactly is a few?

Also, are you able to add any other information regarding nationality, age etc etc?

Cheers

I could add lots of info, but I'm not really sure any of it would be relevant. What I think is relevant is that Immigration didn't want any info as to why I was attempting to make a fourth entry.

But since you ask... 2 or 3 days in KL... Canadian/British... 69.

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I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

That's right. But it gave them a solution to a problem that neither of us wanted.

Anyhoo, for me, this subject is now closed. I just wanted to alert others to what is now looking like a serious problem for anyone with back-to-back 30 days.

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Just to clarify, you say "a few days" in KL between back to back to back. How many exactly is a few?

Also, are you able to add any other information regarding nationality, age etc etc?

Cheers

I could add lots of info, but I'm not really sure any of it would be relevant. What I think is relevant is that Immigration didn't want any info as to why I was attempting to make a fourth entry.

But since you ask... 2 or 3 days in KL... Canadian/British... 69.

It's relevant because other posts have been suggesting there is an element of profiling going on with some of the decisions.

The number of days in KL is relevant because we are all trying to work out what is meant by the term "back to back" being used by Immigration. If I'm gone 14 days and then back 14 days etc etc .. Is the 14 days absence enough to sever the notion of back to back?

Your example makes it clear than flying to KL or Sing, hanging out a couple of days, then flying back doesn't sever back to back.

Cheers

Edited by sandrew33
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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Immigration at airports never check for a departure stamps from another country when you enter because it is not required. Also many countries do not stamp you out.

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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Why is that relevant?

My Australian passport isn't out stamped when I leave Australia. If I then arrive somewhere and use, say, my. British passport, how does that matter?

You have to leave a country on the same passport as you arrived. But there's no rule that you have to arrive in a country on the same passport that you left the previous country.

Excellent point. I would also note the outcome of the thread from a 'new' poster who was allegedly bounced at Swampy a few days ago. I'd really like to see more confirmation that this is happening before allowing myself to get swept up in JDGRUEN-style hyperbole. No question that spending 20 minutes per new arrival grilling them on their travel history is a massive imposition on both Immigration staff and the others waiting in the queue, but if they are serious about sending a message to visa runners I dont see how it can be any other way.

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Multiply this by hundreds of times on International flights landing at Swampy... coming soon. And 99% of those denied will not have a second passport. Fireworks ... when being totally denied after flying 16,000 kilometers. !!!!

Somebody flying 16,000 kilometers would not have back to back to exempt entries that are just a few day apart.

Depends what they see as "a few days" I guess ... and the stuff about 3 chops, lots of us have 5-10 year passports with loads of Thai stamps ...

I had lots of stamps in my old passports. The term used most by immigration is out/in which to me would mean same day. They will not go by the number of stamps you have total.

It will be the most recent ones to see if you are using exempt entries to live here. A few days would be 2 or 3 in my opinion.

I think if the OP had flown into Bangkok he would not of had a problem.

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Multiply this by hundreds of times on International flights landing at Swampy... coming soon. And 99% of those denied will not have a second passport. Fireworks ... when being totally denied after flying 16,000 kilometers. !!!!

Somebody flying 16,000 kilometers would not have back to back to exempt entries that are just a few day apart.
Depends what they see as "a few days" I guess ... and the stuff about 3 chops, lots of us have 5-10 year passports with loads of Thai stamps ...

I had lots of stamps in my old passports. The term used most by immigration is out/in which to me would mean same day. They will not go by the number of stamps you have total.

It will be the most recent ones to see if you are using exempt entries to live here. A few days would be 2 or 3 in my opinion.

I think if the OP had flown into Bangkok he would not of had a problem.

I think, and hope, you are right. Would just be nice to have some greater certainty.

I do the 14 days work, then 14-16 days in Thai thing each month. For 14-16 days the exemption works fine and I don't work in Thailand.

Here's the Thai Embassy in Canberra, Australia's response to my detailed question as to whether the changes would impact someone in my circumstances:post-136411-0-52121000-1405744488_thumb.

Edited by sandrew33
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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Immigration at airports never check for a departure stamps from another country when you enter because it is not required. Also many countries do not stamp you out.

My experience tells me otherwise. There have been a number of times that I had to find the exit stamp of the previous country in my passport for an immigration officer before he would stamp me into his country. In Europe I didn't find this to be the case when I was last there, some years ago. But other places yes.

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Multiply this by hundreds of times on International flights landing at Swampy... coming soon. And 99% of those denied will not have a second passport. Fireworks ... when being totally denied after flying 16,000 kilometers. !!!!

Somebody flying 16,000 kilometers would not have back to back to exempt entries that are just a few day apart.

Depends what they see as "a few days" I guess ... and the stuff about 3 chops, lots of us have 5-10 year passports with loads of Thai stamps ...

I agree because at this point (to be best of my knowledge from extensive reading here on TVF) there is no clear knowledge of how far back IOs will go in examining a passport ins and outs. Would the IOs look for patterns in past - relatively recent activity such as back in March of this year or earlier? Example a foreigner finally leaves Thailand - goes back home - then returns - but he/she has a passport filled with previous ins and outs based on arriving on Exempt entries. I suspect if a foreigner arrives with even a single entry Tourist Visa that they will be allowed entry regardless of a past history in regards to ins and outs. But if arriving after a 16,000 kilometer flight to enter on an Exemption - who knows. In fact because of the seemingly subjective nature of all this - who knows what they will do? We have been surprised already.

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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Why is that relevant?

My Australian passport isn't out stamped when I leave Australia. If I then arrive somewhere and use, say, my. British passport, how does that matter?

You have to leave a country on the same passport as you arrived. But there's no rule that you have to arrive in a country on the same passport that you left the previous country.

As a US citizen, I am never stamped out of or into the US. However, there have been a number of times that I had to find the stamp-out of the previous country before Immigration would stamp me into the country I had just arrived at. Most immigration officers are good at finding the last stamp-out, but my passport has had so many pages added to it, with so many stamps, that there have been times when I had to find the stamp-out for them...that is the only reason I know that it is looked for, at least by some.

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Just to clarify, you say "a few days" in KL between back to back to back. How many exactly is a few?

Also, are you able to add any other information regarding nationality, age etc etc?

Cheers

I could add lots of info, but I'm not really sure any of it would be relevant. What I think is relevant is that Immigration didn't want any info as to why I was attempting to make a fourth entry.

But since you ask... 2 or 3 days in KL... Canadian/British... 69.

paulsr,

What passport did they initially reject British or Canadian?

FD

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Multiply this by hundreds of times on International flights landing at Swampy... coming soon. And 99% of those denied will not have a second passport. Fireworks ... when being totally denied after flying 16,000 kilometers. !!!!

Somebody flying 16,000 kilometers would not have back to back to exempt entries that are just a few day apart.

Depends what they see as "a few days" I guess ... and the stuff about 3 chops, lots of us have 5-10 year passports with loads of Thai stamps ...

I had lots of stamps in my old passports. The term used most by immigration is out/in which to me would mean same day. They will not go by the number of stamps you have total.

It will be the most recent ones to see if you are using exempt entries to live here. A few days would be 2 or 3 in my opinion.

I think if the OP had flown into Bangkok he would not of had a problem.

"It will be the most recent ones to see if you are using exempt entries to live here."

I hope that is the case. I will test this in a few days, when I try to fly into BKK from LA via Seoul. My passport is loaded with 15 and 30 day waivers, back-to-back reentry the same day, as well as at least a couple of tourist visas. I have been out of Thailand for just over two months now, and all I want to do is get to India, for which I have a ten-year tourist visa. Need to buy my ticket to India in Bangkok, but have my return ticket BKK-LA (set for January). I bought this ticket before the start of this 'crack down'. If I had known, I would have gone through KL or even directly to India. I really have never been anything but a tourist - never worked in Thailand and never intend to. If Korean Air offers to reroute me to KL instead of BKK, I will do it; I plan on asking them about it. Will try to post on how I do.

Edited by xray
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Yes , for some reason at Pedang Basar and all Malaysia -Thai borders you must have an exit stamp from the last country you came from , I'm a resident and don't usually get stamped out but I had to walk back and get one at PB as the wouldn't let me enter Thailand. At the airport its different of course

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My tongue-in-cheek comment about a second passport was removed by the Mods, but (being serious now), it seems that those of us who qualify for a passport from another country may have 'an ace card' if they encounter issues with Thai immigration.

I am British but from an Irish family, and am entitled to an Irish passport. This post has encouraged me to apply for that passport, for use in an 'emergency' when entering Thailand.

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Seems this 2 passport option might be the new route for off shore workers.

I know that U.K passport holders can get a 2nd U.K passport if needed for work (ie off shore)

This is for travelling whilst one passport might be at an embassy waiting for a visa approval.

Maybe this will be the answer for some ??

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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Immigration at airports never check for a departure stamps from another country when you enter because it is not required. Also many countries do not stamp you out.

My experience tells me otherwise. There have been a number of times that I had to find the exit stamp of the previous country in my passport for an immigration officer before he would stamp me into his country. In Europe I didn't find this to be the case when I was last there, some years ago. But other places yes.

When I fly from Hkg to Bkk, I don't get stamped out of Hkg (nor do I get stamped into Hkg) as I pass through the electronic gates. Ditto when I fly from KL to Bkk. So far, I have not had any immi official ask for the exit stamp (as there is obviously none).

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"So when I politely asked 'If I use this passport may I enter?' they quickly flipped through it and said 'Yes, no problem.'"

I'm surprised they let you use the other passport, if your KL stamp-out was in the denied passport. The passport you were stamped-in to Thailand with had no originating flight stamp-out from KL, is that right?

Why is that relevant?

My Australian passport isn't out stamped when I leave Australia. If I then arrive somewhere and use, say, my. British passport, how does that matter?

You have to leave a country on the same passport as you arrived. But there's no rule that you have to arrive in a country on the same passport that you left the previous country.

As a US citizen, I am never stamped out of or into the US. However, there have been a number of times that I had to find the stamp-out of the previous country before Immigration would stamp me into the country I had just arrived at. Most immigration officers are good at finding the last stamp-out, but my passport has had so many pages added to it, with so many stamps, that there have been times when I had to find the stamp-out for them...that is the only reason I know that it is looked for, at least by some.

In what countries?

I have been a regular traveller for 25+ years all over the world having lived in a number of countries and worked/travelled to many more. I've never had it happen, so I'm interested to know where

Edited by sandrew33
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