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Urgent advice needed please. Moving from Thailand to Cambodia.


craigp

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Some amazing advice and I sincerely thank you all.

The same question came up again and again. "Why don't I move to another part of Thailand" The simple answer is the Visa issue. Cambodia seems much easier. I don't need or expect much from Cambodia, but it's the only place I can get a visa easily.

I'd also consider Laos or Myanmar if I could easily get a visa.

Now, I'm on a marriage extension to a Thai as she's got me by the balls.

So, I'd have to walk away from most of my possessions, but my bike, dog and computers and the things I'd like to keep. I guess selling the bike is the best way. I'm well traveled in SE Asia. OK, I haven't spent much time in Cambodia, but I'm sure I'll manage.

I just can't think straight with all that is going on now and don't know the right order to do things.

Unless I can get another visa for Thailand, I can only see Cambodia as my next best option. I know Cambodia isn't going to be a bed a roses, but it won't take much to be better than my current situation.

So, with all the things I own, whats the best way to get myself into Cambodia? I guess go over alone and get a place rented first would be a smart move.? Then, I have a place to take my dog and all else.

One other thing, I need a good internet connection, but from my research, this isn't a problem.

Thanks again everyone.

Ok - if your sure Cambodia is your only option then my advice is head for the coast. Sihanoukville is just about liveable. Kampot is ok - but very boring indeed. Forget Phnom Penh - especially with having a dog - there's nowhere to walk them for one thing. Definitely come here alone first - finding decent, affordable accomodation here is nowhere near as easy as Thailand so it could take you awhile. The problem with living here after Thailand is it just doesn't compare - Thailand trumps Cambodia in just about every area except getting a visa and being able to live in the country long-term.

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It is actually called an "ordinary" visa, not a business visa. What yo uwill get will be for just 30 days, then you extend it - any travel agent can do.

Easy to bring a dog though be sure you have a good cage for her as some taxis may object to taking you with an animal otherwise. There are share taxis to Phnom Penh, Siem Reap etc. Have proof of rabies vaccination with you, sometimes they ask to see it and sometimes not. I bring dogs and cats back and forth regularly.

Finding a place that will let you stay with a dog, a little harder, though there are some.

Household belongings/clothes and the like not a bog problem unless really large quantity or a lot of new stuff in which case you may have to bargain a bit. Your other problem is, where on earth are you going to stay when you arrive with all that stuff (and dog)? I suggest you make an initial trip with a more modest quantity of things - say 2-3 suitcases full - and without the dog to suss things out and find accomodation, then go back to Thailand to get the rest of your stuff and the dog.

Motorcycle is another matter. Only 2 border crossings let you take a vehicle across, and that is on condition that you will bring it back out again. And then there is the issue of not having Camboduan plates and registration. Maybe someone else can advise further on this but it might make more sense to sell the motor here and buy another once in Cambodia, if you decide to stay.

Not to mention the obvious, but moving to an unfamiliar country solely to get away from a bad relationship isn't exactly wise planning and if it is your sole reason for going to Cambodia you may well not be happy there.. Why not extradite yourself from the relationship first (plenty of places in Thailand you could go to that are far from CM) and, having done that, take your time to visit Cambodia and see if it is somewhere you would like to live, and whether you can afford it etc.

Mate moved to Cambodia a few years back, similar reason to you, bad relationship ! He has moved back to Thailand end of last year, completely different area to his ex, she was a nutter.. told me he wasted time, and money in Cambodia and should have only moved away from her, Cambodia was a struggle to live. He stated..

While I agree jumping into a place you have never been is a gamble; but sometimes you have to take a risk. His woman problems seem almost commonplace in the LOS; frequent enough to posit Thailand, or its culture, as the causal agent. Taking household goods, vehicles and pets is something I would not even consider; unless someone else is paying and going through the hassles. However, many people need their personal stuff about them or think they can save a few bucks by doing so. I suggest the OP visit Cambodia for a long vacation to decide—getting away from the problems here may be part of the answer.

I know three foreigners who have moved from Thailand to Cambodia within the last four years. Two are retired, one an NES teacher. Each had lived in Thailand several years, but did not get married or buy property here. They all are happy they moved.

The problems they see with Cambodia are the civil and technological infrastructure is worse, good medical facilities are scarce, and the corruption is rampant. However, it is much cheaper to live in Cambodia—rents, food, alcohol are all cheaper. A local beer in the girlie bars is B35, about B11 in the stores. There are lower import duties on almost everything, so foreign goods like cars, bikes, wine, cheeses, good beef, and most anything shipped in from abroad costs less. Breads, steaks, lamb chops, cheeses, coffees, and wines are readily available at very cheap prices in comparison to Thailand.

Visas are not a problem, you pay a relatively small fee and get it; no hoops to jump through, no frequent reporting, no changing rules and requirements every time you go. And, perhaps more important for so many TV posters; fewer occurrences of cuckolded husbands/boyfriends are reported.

I have visited all three; they live well, enjoy their lives, and can't understand why I am still here. The NES teacher makes more money teaching there than he did here; needless to say, when combined with lower costs he is better equipped to follow his non-academic pursuits. One of the retirees opened a business and is working it; something he could not do in Thailand because he couldn't manage the costs or the visa requirements. The third is just retired, enjoying a much happier life being taken care of by an unpretentious Cambodian girl who does not hurt the eyes and has learned to cook his favorite foods. He spends his time tinkering in his garden and drinking his favorite red and white vin ordinaire for B120/bottle.

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Some amazing advice and I sincerely thank you all.

The same question came up again and again. "Why don't I move to another part of Thailand" The simple answer is the Visa issue. Cambodia seems much easier. I don't need or expect much from Cambodia, but it's the only place I can get a visa easily.

I'd also consider Laos or Myanmar if I could easily get a visa.

Now, I'm on a marriage extension to a Thai as she's got me by the balls.

So, I'd have to walk away from most of my possessions, but my bike, dog and computers and the things I'd like to keep. I guess selling the bike is the best way. I'm well traveled in SE Asia. OK, I haven't spent much time in Cambodia, but I'm sure I'll manage.

I just can't think straight with all that is going on now and don't know the right order to do things.

Unless I can get another visa for Thailand, I can only see Cambodia as my next best option. I know Cambodia isn't going to be a bed a roses, but it won't take much to be better than my current situation.

So, with all the things I own, whats the best way to get myself into Cambodia? I guess go over alone and get a place rented first would be a smart move.? Then, I have a place to take my dog and all else.

One other thing, I need a good internet connection, but from my research, this isn't a problem.

Thanks again everyone.

when does your marriage extension expire? if you have a some time left on it then how about taking your dog down to koh samui for a bit of a break? clear your head. lamai is nice and quiet. your girl is probably making all sorts of threats. hard to think straight with all of that going on.

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Also check out Kampot. Only 2 1/2 hours from PP and 90 minutes from Snkvlle. Nice little expat community, loads of good restaurants and beautiful river. Not as hot and polluted as Bottombang.

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Why are you so scared of her?

What difference could this possibly make? Is it necessary to make the OP put every detail of his private hell on display? Do we not collectively have more than enough information from "other sources," including in many cases, personal experience, to fill in the blanks ourselves? She is Thai. He is not, That should provide at least a clue. When things go south here, they tend to do so, profoundly. Bailing on Thailand, in many cases, is the only way to truly break from some of these situations. I know, because this is the approach I probably should have taken, myself, quite a ways back. But I opted to stay. The personal cost of that decision has been, and will likely continue to be, high, though in my case, the sacrifice has been for a little girl.

And for everyone's edification, if a humanitarian sort of individual packs a bit of resilience and open-mindedness, they can and will find a much more suitable quality of overall existence in Cambodia, than perhaps anyplace else in the region. Sure, it's gritty. But so is Thailand. Existence there can (and will be, at times) a struggle, but so goes Thailand. It can be a bit more volatile and unpredictable as well, but in ways that are much more fathomable to most westerners. And if you can understand why a place is the way it is or does what it does, it makes it infinitely easier to accept even the downsides. Just chose locales wisely, and vow never to repeat the same patterns that led to your current dilemma. Details have little bearing on this, whatsoever. And rubbernecking at anyone's expense is simply not dignified.

Keep your head up when appropriate, OP, and down when circumstances dictate. You will be fine. Oh, and one more thing. Listen very closely to Sheryl. And Sheryl, I don't know if you would call it love exactly, but I want to have your children. wink.png

And why were you so scared of her? You move from Chiang Rai to Songkla you think she can "hunt you down", or bother to?

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From what he says, the issue with staying in Thailand after they split up isn't that she will "hunt him down" but that he is dependent on marriage visa to stay here, which he will lose when they divorce.

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You can always get a visa based on marriage outside the country while you're still married. When you come to divorce, that visa will not cancelled, unlike an extension.

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It is actually called an "ordinary" visa, not a business visa. What yo uwill get will be for just 30 days, then you extend it - any travel agent can do.

Easy to bring a dog though be sure you have a good cage for her as some taxis may object to taking you with an animal otherwise. There are share taxis to Phnom Penh, Siem Reap etc. Have proof of rabies vaccination with you, sometimes they ask to see it and sometimes not. I bring dogs and cats back and forth regularly.

Finding a place that will let you stay with a dog, a little harder, though there are some.

Household belongings/clothes and the like not a bog problem unless really large quantity or a lot of new stuff in which case you may have to bargain a bit. Your other problem is, where on earth are you going to stay when you arrive with all that stuff (and dog)? I suggest you make an initial trip with a more modest quantity of things - say 2-3 suitcases full - and without the dog to suss things out and find accomodation, then go back to Thailand to get the rest of your stuff and the dog.

Motorcycle is another matter. Only 2 border crossings let you take a vehicle across, and that is on condition that you will bring it back out again. And then there is the issue of not having Camboduan plates and registration. Maybe someone else can advise further on this but it might make more sense to sell the motor here and buy another once in Cambodia, if you decide to stay.

Not to mention the obvious, but moving to an unfamiliar country solely to get away from a bad relationship isn't exactly wise planning and if it is your sole reason for going to Cambodia you may well not be happy there.. Why not extradite yourself from the relationship first (plenty of places in Thailand you could go to that are far from CM) and, having done that, take your time to visit Cambodia and see if it is somewhere you would like to live, and whether you can afford it etc.

Mate moved to Cambodia a few years back, similar reason to you, bad relationship ! He has moved back to Thailand end of last year, completely different area to his ex, she was a nutter.. told me he wasted time, and money in Cambodia and should have only moved away from her, Cambodia was a struggle to live. He stated..

While I agree jumping into a place you have never been is a gamble; but sometimes you have to take a risk. His woman problems seem almost commonplace in the LOS; frequent enough to posit Thailand, or its culture, as the causal agent. Taking household goods, vehicles and pets is something I would not even consider; unless someone else is paying and going through the hassles. However, many people need their personal stuff about them or think they can save a few bucks by doing so. I suggest the OP visit Cambodia for a long vacation to decide—getting away from the problems here may be part of the answer.

I know three foreigners who have moved from Thailand to Cambodia within the last four years. Two are retired, one an NES teacher. Each had lived in Thailand several years, but did not get married or buy property here. They all are happy they moved.

The problems they see with Cambodia are the civil and technological infrastructure is worse, good medical facilities are scarce, and the corruption is rampant. However, it is much cheaper to live in Cambodia—rents, food, alcohol are all cheaper. A local beer in the girlie bars is B35, about B11 in the stores. There are lower import duties on almost everything, so foreign goods like cars, bikes, wine, cheeses, good beef, and most anything shipped in from abroad costs less. Breads, steaks, lamb chops, cheeses, coffees, and wines are readily available at very cheap prices in comparison to Thailand.

Visas are not a problem, you pay a relatively small fee and get it; no hoops to jump through, no frequent reporting, no changing rules and requirements every time you go. And, perhaps more important for so many TV posters; fewer occurrences of cuckolded husbands/boyfriends are reported.

I have visited all three; they live well, enjoy their lives, and can't understand why I am still here. The NES teacher makes more money teaching there than he did here; needless to say, when combined with lower costs he is better equipped to follow his non-academic pursuits. One of the retirees opened a business and is working it; something he could not do in Thailand because he couldn't manage the costs or the visa requirements. The third is just retired, enjoying a much happier life being taken care of by an unpretentious Cambodian girl who does not hurt the eyes and has learned to cook his favorite foods. He spends his time tinkering in his garden and drinking his favorite red and white vin ordinaire for B120/bottle.

Rent is way more expensive in Cambodia. So is electric and loads of other things. Quality of life is generally not as good here - sorry.

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If you do decide to check out Cambodia, do visit Battambang. It has a lively arts scene and prices (and security) are better than Sihanoukville. Kampot might be an up-and-coming place, but it's still a sleepy backwater most of the time and is prone to serious flooding. The only desirable accommodations there are expensive, unlike Battambang. I agree with those who have posted that Cambodia is *not* cheap anymore. The flood of NGOs and government aid agencies have driven rents through the roof in Phnom Penh, and utilities everywhere are more expensive than here. I still don't see why you can't switch to a different kind of visa in Thailand, since so many people manage to do it. In any case, good luck with your choices and decision.

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Kampot has become a horror of backpacker and expat insanity. It was once a lovely place; now it's somewhere that the Khmer are gently being forced out of to be replaced by identikit Western tourists ("peace, love, and complete BS man").

Battambang is quite lovely but I can't imagine wanting to live there - it's light on facilities and things to do. A week there is fantastic, a year would lead most people to wish they'd never been born. I think Battambang will eventually get some love; certainly you could do worse things than move there and open a bar (as to date it doesn't have any bars - just restaurants which are packed with people trying to get drunk and pretend they're bars). If Battambang wins its UNESCO status - the tourists will go from a trickle to a flood - and rents are cheap there and you can negotiate the kind of ultra-long lease that made Siem Reap insanely profitable for the first people to settle on Pub Street. There are some lovely Chinese shop houses on the river which you could live in the upstairs and run a business out of the downstairs. If you're not planning on starting a business - you'll expire of boredom in Battambang.

From a "most people" perspective the options are and always have been - Siem Reap (if you want a real community and a decent standard of life but don't absolutely need girly bars and tons of nightlife), Phnom Penh (if you need a "capital" vibe with tons of low rent girly bars and nightclubs plus a casino - be prepared to feel less safe than in Siem Reap as a trade off) or Sihanoukville (if you want a beach, low rent girly bars and a dreadful drug habit).

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Head to nong khai my man...perfect spot

I'm sure it is, but I don't think it'll help my visa issue.

It is, and it won't. Best of luck in Cambo. I think you will ultimately find the right situation. Just keep expectations to a minimum, and remain as emotionally neutral as possible. Try to remember that there is no universally recognizable good or bad anywhere. There is only different. Existence is predicated upon some degree of suffering and slow, but constant change, no matter where you go. This applies to all life forms, at all times. So, If today doesn't suit you, tomorrow might. If not, the next day. Know what I mean? Nothing is forever (Buddha's words, if you like), my brother. But it will certainly feel like it is. Just keep in mind that there are few things as unreliable as feelings. Therefore, by remaining neutral we can much better focus on what is actually happening around us, rather than what we perceive to be happening filtered through whatever we happen to be feeling at a given moment. Remember, even when we are 100% convinced of the motivations behind what we are witnessing, we will almost always, without fail, be dead-wrong. Don't let anyone lull you into thinking otherwise. Better to let situations develop, no matter how uncomfortable we may feel in the interim, than to "go off half-cocked." One last piece of advice: Don't try to force outcomes. We won't always get what we want, nor should we. Whenever you can stand to do so, let the other guy/gal "win." As this is a distance race, opposed to a sprint, the dividends from this approach over the course of a lifetime, are limitless.

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It is actually called an "ordinary" visa, not a business visa. What yo uwill get will be for just 30 days, then you extend it - any travel agent can do.

Easy to bring a dog though be sure you have a good cage for her as some taxis may object to taking you with an animal otherwise. There are share taxis to Phnom Penh, Siem Reap etc. Have proof of rabies vaccination with you, sometimes they ask to see it and sometimes not. I bring dogs and cats back and forth regularly.

Finding a place that will let you stay with a dog, a little harder, though there are some.

Household belongings/clothes and the like not a bog problem unless really large quantity or a lot of new stuff in which case you may have to bargain a bit. Your other problem is, where on earth are you going to stay when you arrive with all that stuff (and dog)? I suggest you make an initial trip with a more modest quantity of things - say 2-3 suitcases full - and without the dog to suss things out and find accomodation, then go back to Thailand to get the rest of your stuff and the dog.

Motorcycle is another matter. Only 2 border crossings let you take a vehicle across, and that is on condition that you will bring it back out again. And then there is the issue of not having Camboduan plates and registration. Maybe someone else can advise further on this but it might make more sense to sell the motor here and buy another once in Cambodia, if you decide to stay.

Not to mention the obvious, but moving to an unfamiliar country solely to get away from a bad relationship isn't exactly wise planning and if it is your sole reason for going to Cambodia you may well not be happy there.. Why not extradite yourself from the relationship first (plenty of places in Thailand you could go to that are far from CM) and, having done that, take your time to visit Cambodia and see if it is somewhere you would like to live, and whether you can afford it etc.

Mate moved to Cambodia a few years back, similar reason to you, bad relationship ! He has moved back to Thailand end of last year, completely different area to his ex, she was a nutter.. told me he wasted time, and money in Cambodia and should have only moved away from her, Cambodia was a struggle to live. He stated..

While I agree jumping into a place you have never been is a gamble; but sometimes you have to take a risk. His woman problems seem almost commonplace in the LOS; frequent enough to posit Thailand, or its culture, as the causal agent. Taking household goods, vehicles and pets is something I would not even consider; unless someone else is paying and going through the hassles. However, many people need their personal stuff about them or think they can save a few bucks by doing so. I suggest the OP visit Cambodia for a long vacation to decide—getting away from the problems here may be part of the answer.

I know three foreigners who have moved from Thailand to Cambodia within the last four years. Two are retired, one an NES teacher. Each had lived in Thailand several years, but did not get married or buy property here. They all are happy they moved.

The problems they see with Cambodia are the civil and technological infrastructure is worse, good medical facilities are scarce, and the corruption is rampant. However, it is much cheaper to live in Cambodia—rents, food, alcohol are all cheaper. A local beer in the girlie bars is B35, about B11 in the stores. There are lower import duties on almost everything, so foreign goods like cars, bikes, wine, cheeses, good beef, and most anything shipped in from abroad costs less. Breads, steaks, lamb chops, cheeses, coffees, and wines are readily available at very cheap prices in comparison to Thailand.

Visas are not a problem, you pay a relatively small fee and get it; no hoops to jump through, no frequent reporting, no changing rules and requirements every time you go. And, perhaps more important for so many TV posters; fewer occurrences of cuckolded husbands/boyfriends are reported.

I have visited all three; they live well, enjoy their lives, and can't understand why I am still here. The NES teacher makes more money teaching there than he did here; needless to say, when combined with lower costs he is better equipped to follow his non-academic pursuits. One of the retirees opened a business and is working it; something he could not do in Thailand because he couldn't manage the costs or the visa requirements. The third is just retired, enjoying a much happier life being taken care of by an unpretentious Cambodian girl who does not hurt the eyes and has learned to cook his favorite foods. He spends his time tinkering in his garden and drinking his favorite red and white vin ordinaire for B120/bottle.

Rent is way more expensive in Cambodia. So is electric and loads of other things. Quality of life is generally not as good here - sorry.

No argument on quality of life, if infrastructure, medical care, and less corruption are part of that equation--reread my post.

However, I can only relate what I have been told on monthly rentals, each one of my three friends claims to pay less rent and utilities in Cambodia--two in Sihanoukville and one in Siem Reap.

However, I know for a fact that I paid less money in comparable hotels in Phom Penh than I did in Bangkok--on the same trip--and less money in Sihanoukville than I did in Phuket--on the same trip and the hotel in S'ville was better than the one in Phuket. The hotel I stayed in S'ville was $15/day (B525 mol) and it included a large a/c room, large flatscreen TV, wifi, jacuzzi tub, and a swimming pool just outside my door.

I stayed with my friend in Siem Reap--he has a lovely little 2bedroom/2bath detached house with garden for $180/month (B6500 mol), not sure of his utilities bill.

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I pay less rent in Thailand than in Cambodia but I live a high standard of life. My place in Cambodia include bills, cleaner, and rent for a 1 bedroom apartment set me back about $1,500 a month. In Thailand (for the same things) I pay less than $1,000 and that includes a private internet connection (which my apartment complex wouldn't let me have in Cambodia).

Like-for-like rentals in Cambodia are much worse than in Thailand for the same money. I'd also say (having stayed in a lot of hotels in Cambodia and Thailand) that while service in Cambodia is often friendlier - the quality of like-for-like spending on hotels is better in Thailand than in Cambodia too. Bangkok is the sole exception - you do pay through the nose for a good hotel room (though to be fair - it would be hard to find an equivalent for such a room in Cambodia - the serviced apartment I take in Bangkok has a home cinema system, and fully equipped kitchen - never in a million years will you find that in Phnom Penh).

Living in a house in Cambodia is an excellent plan to wake up with nothing - burglary is rife. If you're not living in security controlled accommodation - it's a question of when not if you will be robbed.

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A brand new 2 bed 2 bath apartment in Phnom Penh with all mod cons,internet,cable TV,washing machine etc is USD $450-600 per month,try finding that anywhere in Bangkok you will struggle!

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It's actually cheaper to rent in PP than in Bangkok , but many of the buildings are a bit worn down . Only electricity is more expensive.

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It is very difficult to compare rentals/homes between the two countries because the type of accomodation is completely different. it will not be a "like for like" comparison.

A small liveable apartment can be had in Phnom Penh for $300 on up depending on neighborhood. Larger apartment, apartment with amenities, whole house, obviously more. People I know are paying anywhere from $300 to $2,000 a month.

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Yup, it's the "like for like" that people fail to take into account in the comparison. I can get "cheap" in Cambodia but not "cheap with quality". In Thailand I can get "cheap and quality". My mate pays 4,200 Baht a month rent in Chiang Mai for a small one bed apartment with cooking facilities, air con, a fridge, a telly, etc. and free Wi-Fi and a generator backup for power cuts too. I've never seen anything remotely equivalent in the budget range in Cambodia. Not even close - sure I can find something for the same money but it will be a dump barely fit for human habitation.

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While I agree jumping into a place you have never been is a gamble; but sometimes you have to take a risk. His woman problems seem almost commonplace in the LOS; frequent enough to posit Thailand, or its culture, as the causal agent. Taking household goods, vehicles and pets is something I would not even consider; unless someone else is paying and going through the hassles. However, many people need their personal stuff about them or think they can save a few bucks by doing so. I suggest the OP visit Cambodia for a long vacation to decide—getting away from the problems here may be part of the answer.

I know three foreigners who have moved from Thailand to Cambodia within the last four years. Two are retired, one an NES teacher. Each had lived in Thailand several years, but did not get married or buy property here. They all are happy they moved.

The problems they see with Cambodia are the civil and technological infrastructure is worse, good medical facilities are scarce, and the corruption is rampant. However, it is much cheaper to live in Cambodia—rents, food, alcohol are all cheaper. A local beer in the girlie bars is B35, about B11 in the stores. There are lower import duties on almost everything, so foreign goods like cars, bikes, wine, cheeses, good beef, and most anything shipped in from abroad costs less. Breads, steaks, lamb chops, cheeses, coffees, and wines are readily available at very cheap prices in comparison to Thailand.

Visas are not a problem, you pay a relatively small fee and get it; no hoops to jump through, no frequent reporting, no changing rules and requirements every time you go. And, perhaps more important for so many TV posters; fewer occurrences of cuckolded husbands/boyfriends are reported.

I have visited all three; they live well, enjoy their lives, and can't understand why I am still here. The NES teacher makes more money teaching there than he did here; needless to say, when combined with lower costs he is better equipped to follow his non-academic pursuits. One of the retirees opened a business and is working it; something he could not do in Thailand because he couldn't manage the costs or the visa requirements. The third is just retired, enjoying a much happier life being taken care of by an unpretentious Cambodian girl who does not hurt the eyes and has learned to cook his favorite foods. He spends his time tinkering in his garden and drinking his favorite red and white vin ordinaire for B120/bottle.

There's a lot of disinformation about Cambodia in this thread. First, there's no proof that crime is any worse in Cambodia than in Thailand nowadays. Cambodia is corrupt but so is Thailand.

Second, the place to live within Cambodia really depends on OPs personal decision, Phnom Penh has a lot of traffic, but it also has a large expat community and most job opportunities. Without knowing OP it's impossible to recommend a place. I know people with dogs living in Phnom Penh, they're renting a townhouse that has a garden so it is possible.

Third, there is no evidence that Cambodian women are any better than Thai, in fact the types of women foreigners meet in Cambodia can be extremely dangerous. I'm not going to tell my story here,

but my life was seriously in danger because of a Cambodian women. I also knew an American who went to Cambodian prison for 3.5 years because of a jealous Cambodian ex-girlfriend. As a matter of fact, English speaking streetwalkers who foreigners are likely to meet are 90% criminals, so be extremely careful.

Normal Cambodian women are super sweet and not criminals like the streetwalkers but they don't speak English and usually don't talk to foreigners.

As for prices, housing in Cambodia also depends on which city you are in. Phnom Penh is more expensive than Thailand, but if you go down to Sihanoukville you can get an apartment for 70-150 dollars.

Food is much more limited in Cambodia than Thailand and is more expensive, however alcohol is much cheaper, so whether the end result is cheaper or more expensive depend on your consumption habits.

No way foreign goods cost less in Cambodia, they cost much less in Thailand, for example dairy products are way cheaper in Thailand.

Good medical facilities are also available in Phnom Penh, but they are really expensive. I seriously doubt a 4 dollar wine would be anyone's favorites. It's not that cheap.

As for which is better, noone can say because they are completely different worlds.

I lived there for three years, so hope that clears a couple things up.

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if the OP has a lot of stuff which he can not / does not want to bring to Cambo immediately, he should consider to rent a storage unit. No idea where he is located (he didn't mention that?), but there are great options such as ustoreitpattaya , Western-style managed by a born Thai who was raised in the US and is a US citizen, a very nice and helpful lad. reasonable units start at a mere 1.400 Baht a month and the place is clean and secure (went there once to have a look even though eventually I did not make use of their service yet)

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  • 2 weeks later...

if the OP has a lot of stuff which he can not / does not want to bring to Cambo immediately, he should consider to rent a storage unit. No idea where he is located (he didn't mention that?), but there are great options such as ustoreitpattaya , Western-style managed by a born Thai who was raised in the US and is a US citizen, a very nice and helpful lad. reasonable units start at a mere 1.400 Baht a month and the place is clean and secure (went there once to have a look even though eventually I did not make use of their service yet)

Good tip.

Chiang Rai is my current humble home.

I actually quite like it. Decent people, good prices and some amazing places.

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I live in Chiang Rai. Nowhere in Cambodia compares. Unlike Thailand, towns in Cambodia are very different from each other. You should park your stuff and look around the whole country to see if you like somewhere. Siem Reap & PP overrun by cars. Battambong nice buildings, good food and good size -stuff to do but not crowded.. Kampong Cham and towns along the Mekong to Lao border ok but hot as hell in summer. Kampot good scenery but too many westerners taking over. They do have lots of dog walkers.

One year might be enough to clean your troubles

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Many towns have good mini bus service. Better than the Toyotas you see in Chiang Rai. They go quicker coz they don't stop everywhere like the buses and they leave on time. They should take you to the hotel. Hotels are dirt cheap all over Cambodia. Internet is good almost everywhere.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Why are you so scared of her?

What difference could this possibly make? Is it necessary to make the OP put every detail of his private hell on display? Do we not collectively have more than enough information from "other sources," including in many cases, personal experience, to fill in the blanks ourselves? She is Thai. He is not, That should provide at least a clue. When things go south here, they tend to do so, profoundly. Bailing on Thailand, in many cases, is the only way to truly break from some of these situations. I know, because this is the approach I probably should have taken, myself, quite a ways back. But I opted to stay. The personal cost of that decision has been, and will likely continue to be, high, though in my case, the sacrifice has been for a little girl.

And for everyone's edification, if a humanitarian sort of individual packs a bit of resilience and open-mindedness, they can and will find a much more suitable quality of overall existence in Cambodia, than perhaps anyplace else in the region. Sure, it's gritty. But so is Thailand. Existence there can (and will be, at times) a struggle, but so goes Thailand. It can be a bit more volatile and unpredictable as well, but in ways that are much more fathomable to most westerners. And if you can understand why a place is the way it is or does what it does, it makes it infinitely easier to accept even the downsides. Just chose locales wisely, and vow never to repeat the same patterns that led to your current dilemma. Details have little bearing on this, whatsoever. And rubbernecking at anyone's expense is simply not dignified.

Keep your head up when appropriate, OP, and down when circumstances dictate. You will be fine. Oh, and one more thing. Listen very closely to Sheryl. And Sheryl, I don't know if you would call it love exactly, but I want to have your children. wink.png

What a wise and understanding post. Someone who has bothered to really read and understand the post. Hat off to you sir. And stand in line, Sheryls mine :-)
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Why are you so scared of her?

What difference could this possibly make? Is it necessary to make the OP put every detail of his private hell on display? Do we not collectively have more than enough information from "other sources," including in many cases, personal experience, to fill in the blanks ourselves? She is Thai. He is not, That should provide at least a clue. When things go south here, they tend to do so, profoundly. Bailing on Thailand, in many cases, is the only way to truly break from some of these situations. I know, because this is the approach I probably should have taken, myself, quite a ways back. But I opted to stay. The personal cost of that decision has been, and will likely continue to be, high, though in my case, the sacrifice has been for a little girl.

And for everyone's edification, if a humanitarian sort of individual packs a bit of resilience and open-mindedness, they can and will find a much more suitable quality of overall existence in Cambodia, than perhaps anyplace else in the region. Sure, it's gritty. But so is Thailand. Existence there can (and will be, at times) a struggle, but so goes Thailand. It can be a bit more volatile and unpredictable as well, but in ways that are much more fathomable to most westerners. And if you can understand why a place is the way it is or does what it does, it makes it infinitely easier to accept even the downsides. Just chose locales wisely, and vow never to repeat the same patterns that led to your current dilemma. Details have little bearing on this, whatsoever. And rubbernecking at anyone's expense is simply not dignified.

Keep your head up when appropriate, OP, and down when circumstances dictate. You will be fine. Oh, and one more thing. Listen very closely to Sheryl. And Sheryl, I don't know if you would call it love exactly, but I want to have your children. wink.png

What a wise and understanding post. Someone who has bothered to really read and understand the post. Hat off to you sir. And stand in line, Sheryls mine :-)

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  • 1 month later...

NGOs and - even more so as they are able to pay more - UN agencies pushed up rents in the 90's but have had nothing to do with the rent increases in the past decade, in fact they are struggling to keep up and many have relocated to more peripheral areas precisely because of soaring rents. In addition, then umber of international NGOs with programs in Cambodia have been steadily decreasing as the country (which has now moved from "low income" to "lower middle income" on the WB charts) has significantly improved in its socioeconomic indicators.

 

Chinese and other Asian business people are more a factor these days.

 

The other factor is continuing wild real estate speculation with people buying and selling properties rapidly creating artificially high prices which owners then seek to offset with unrealistically high rents. That and construction of way more luxury condos than there is a market for.

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On 8/10/2016 at 6:10 AM, vinniekintana said:

 

As others have noted....Cambodia beats Thailand only on the visa front and ease to open your own biz. (and lose money thereafter)

Everything else is inferior

Retirees esp. should give it a wide berth

That's not true, Cambodia beats Thailand on being more 1) exotic 2) authentic 3) friendly,

and also 4) cheaper beer and 5) no xenophobia and 6) women less cutthroat materialistic.

I agree it's not a good place for retirees, because the only activity they would have is drinking.

Rents are relatively high in Phnom Penh because there is a shortage of quality rental housing at the low end ie. (100-300 usd). The newly built condos are rented out at 500+. If you leave Phnom Penh rents are much more affordable.

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