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1,000 year old jars and artifacts discovered in Surin field


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Wonder if the owner of the land also gets ownership of the jars, which could be worth a lot, or do the kind Thai authorities simply claim the entire find in the name of the State and take it away.

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6 hours ago, steve73 said:

Premium quality Bpla-ra maybe...!

That could actually be a possibility, as it's said that Pompei were famous for something similar, and Pompei vanished from the surface almost two thousand years ago, i.e. 79 a.d...🙂

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4 hours ago, khunPer said:

That could actually be a possibility, as it's said that Pompei were famous for something similar, and Pompei vanished from the surface almost two thousand years ago, i.e. 79 a.d...🙂

That could actually be a possibility, as it's said that Pompei were famous for something similar, and Pompei vanished from the surface almost two thousand years ago, i.e. 79 a.d...

 

What is the evidence which was used to estimate the age of these jars ?

 

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15 hours ago, khunPer said:

Interesting, 1,000 years ago is before the Sukhotai Kingdom that existed from 1238 and until 1438, and also before the Angkor Wat-era, which began shortly after 1100.

oh dear.... what if these artifacts prove that Siam was a vassal state conquered by foreigners back then........??

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8 hours ago, bangon04 said:

oh dear.... what if these artifacts prove that Siam was a vassal state conquered by foreigners back then........??

It probably was, as it was before "Siam", i.e. the Sukhothai kingdom.

 

By the way, the old states had no names, they were known as city states or "Mueang", meaning a town with a defensive wall, and the Thai's city state therefore called "Mueang Thai". "Siam" was a name created by the Portuguese sailors late in the 1400s when they found Ayutthaya, and later official name of the country from 1782 till 1939 (plus 1946-1948)...🙂

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23 minutes ago, khunPer said:

 "Siam" was a name created by the Portuguese sailors late in the 1400s when they found Ayutthaya, and later official name of the country from 1782 till 1939 (plus 1946-1948)...🙂

Sujit Wongtet looks very closely at the origins of "Siam" in one of his books. I can't find it right now but I think Jit Phumisak showed the origins of "Siam" going back to local Tai language, meaning a land of springs or something similar. There are references to "Siam" tht would be going back well before the 1400s I seem to remember. Jit Phumisak thought it was an area on the Mekhong in present Chiang Rai but Sujit Wongtet feels the evidence points to the Vientiane area. 

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32 minutes ago, KhaoNiaw said:

Sujit Wongtet looks very closely at the origins of "Siam" in one of his books. I can't find it right now but I think Jit Phumisak showed the origins of "Siam" going back to local Tai language, meaning a land of springs or something similar. There are references to "Siam" tht would be going back well before the 1400s I seem to remember. Jit Phumisak thought it was an area on the Mekhong in present Chiang Rai but Sujit Wongtet feels the evidence points to the Vientiane area. 

Interesting, thanks.

 

Some mentions Siam as originating from the Pali, meaning "Land of Gold", i.e. suvaṇṇabhūmi, others says it originates the sanskrit-word Śyāma, meaning brown or dark. The more populisttic version is the Portuguese sailor's misunderstanding of Xian if the late 1400s, when they asked from where the people (i.e. the elite class) originated.

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