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The Sunday DIY job ...


Crossy
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OK, not quite DIY, more (grand) child labour - supervised by Madam of course.

 

Re-gravelling our drive, we had to wait until the ground dried out after last year's flooding otherwise the rocks would just vanish into the squidgy mess.

 

I'm not sure what the "rocks" are actually called, it consists of stones up to around 1/2" along with much finer stuff, with rain and driving it compacts into a very solid surface (digging a channel for some cables was definitely hard work).

 

After some rain and driving on it we'll get another load of the "rocks" and fill in the low spots.

 

The rustic "grass up the middle" drive fits well with our "more jungle than bowling-green" style of garden.

 

 

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Looks like road fill. You need to put a layer of felt (road building stuff) to stop the road base sinking into the dirt or rocks underneath. 

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Yup, I had some of that delivered a few years ago, I think mine is 3/4”, certainly was a good workout getting it into the garden.

 

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In fact i probably should order some more to try and trim the expanding waistline !!

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3 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Looks like road fill. You need to put a layer of felt (road building stuff) to stop the road base sinking into the dirt or rocks underneath. 

 

Yeah, it should have had geotextile when it was first constructed by the builder (I doubt he ever intended it to be permanent). It actually does pretty well and only really sank after the prolonged flooding back end of last year.

 

Not really worth digging it up to do it properly, it works ok as it is.

 

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3 minutes ago, Will B Good said:

Terram. Used it before...magic stuff.

 

Is it actually available here?? Others building "rustic" drives could benefit from using the stuff.

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Not quite a DIY project, but had a small crew just finish laying the footing for a 8 x1.5 mt garden wall that broke and needed fixing.  2000 for material,  8000 baht for labor.

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

Is it actually available here?? Others building "rustic" drives could benefit from using the stuff.

Mmmmm....good point. I used it in the UK and assumed it would be available here.

 

Quick search online reveals zip!!

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Will B Good said:

Mmmmm....good point. I used it in the UK and assumed it would be available here.

 

Quick search online reveals zip!!

Looks like it is available. http://www.geotextile-thailand.com/

and https://www.facebook.com/terrafixthailand/posts/1089802994401544/

But the website isn't very helpful.

Edited by chickenslegs
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3 minutes ago, chickenslegs said:

Looks like it is available. http://www.geotextile-thailand.com/

and https://www.facebook.com/terrafixthailand/posts/1089802994401544/

But the website isn't very helpful.

 

Yeah, the Facebore page may be more useful it's had some "fairly" recent posts, a message may lead to a supplier who can provide the relatively small amounts we would be looking at.

 

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18 minutes ago, Pawpcorn said:

We call that "gravel" in the USA. 🙂

No I don't think it's the same as gravel. Not sure what Crossy used but Crusher Dust or Road Base is more like crushing up those cheap cement blocks. That's what I got from the big brick company. 

 

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I can't remember but I think it's called cement dust or brick dust ฝุ่นซีเมนต์. 

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Good work for keeping in trim, we had some brought in to use as soil cover for roof run off, rather than put more cement everywhere, and used on the run up to the new truck park. 

The leftover on the road in, most done by my good self with the wife sorting the depth and where 😜

I expect squidgy in some areas when there are downpours, where we have widened the road a foot or so, but maybe another load later would stop that once this lot is ground in, finished yesterday 

Good thing today busy calving a first calf heifer 🙂

 

 

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6 minutes ago, 473geo said:

Good work for keeping in trim, we had some brought in to use as soil cover for roof run off, rather than put more cement everywhere, and used on the run up to the new truck park. 

The leftover on the road in, most done by my good self with the wife sorting the depth and where 😜

I expect squidgy in some areas when there are downpours, where we have widened the road a foot or so, but maybe another load later would stop that once this lot is ground in, finished yesterday 

Good thing today busy calving a first calf heifer 🙂

 

 

You must put in the felt or it will disappear as it's pretty dense. Believe me, take a look at our driveway before I knew. 🙂

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2 minutes ago, carlyai said:

You must put in the felt or it will disappear as it's pretty dense. Believe me, take a look at our driveway before I knew. 🙂

 

Yeah, or you put a fair amount down over the years. Ours is pretty stable now.

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1 minute ago, Crossy said:

 

Checked with Madam, she calls it "hin cuck".

More accurate would be "Hin Cluck"

 

We have this on our access road and it made tight as .... 😉

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3 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

Checked with Madam, she calls it "hin cuck".

Yup, my old lady calls it “ Hin cuck “ or crushed stone .

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1 minute ago, MJCM said:

We have this on our access road and it made tight as .... 😉

 

Cluck??

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Posted (edited)

1 sec and I will post the Thai for it, my darling wife is on the road to the old village

 


Edit: Got It!

 

หินคลุก

 

Edit2: Google Translates it as Crushed Stone, but that is IMHO not correct, it has a lot of "sand" in it

 

Phonetic they write it as: H̄in khluk

Edited by MJCM
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4 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

Cluck??

หินบด, I'm never wrong.

 

14 minutes ago, 473geo said:

Good work for keeping in trim, we had some brought in to use as soil cover for roof run off, rather than put more cement everywhere, and used on the run up to the new truck park. 

The leftover on the road in, most done by my good self with the wife sorting the depth and where 😜

I expect squidgy in some areas when there are downpours, where we have widened the road a foot or so, but maybe another load later would stop that once this lot is ground in, finished yesterday 

Good thing today busy calving a first calf heifer 🙂

 

 

You must put in the felt or it will disappear as it's pretty dense. Believe me, take a look at our driveway before I knew. 🙂

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3 minutes ago, MJCM said:

1 sec and I will post the Thai for it, my darling wife is on the road to the old village

 

Here we go "หินคลุก" H̄in khluk - Line Translate says it's "Rock and Roll" :whistling:

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Posted (edited)

This is the stuff what they use for when mixing Concrete and this is called "Hin 3-4"

 

The stuff that is used for the roads and I believe @Crossy is using is smaller and has more "sand" in it. But as said, it can easily wash away and to prevent that use Hin 3-4 on top after a while!

 

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Edited by MJCM
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13 minutes ago, MJCM said:

The stuff that is used for the roads and I believe @Crossy is using is smaller and has more "sand" in it. But as said, it can easily wash away and to prevent that use Hin 3-4 on top after a while!

 

Yeah, the smaller stuff washes through and forms a very dense layer which is almost like concrete.

 

It does need to be driven on to compact properly.

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Posted (edited)

What we did to our drive was similar and put down as a temporary drive. We have managed to avoid the loss of the majority of the building aggregate we put down by using shade cloth in part of it before adding aggregate and the blue striped semi waterproof cloth on the rest. So far, and about 6 years on, we haven’t had to add any more8DAC07A6-470A-467F-A1BE-1B166EBE8B20.thumb.jpeg.31e6e7116553d29537d3d2b9734c0aec.jpeg

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Edited by sometimewoodworker
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7 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

Yeah, the smaller stuff washes through and forms a very dense layer which is almost like concrete.

+1

 

But that said, absolutely great stuff for a low traffic road, like you showed in your pictures, but for "medium - heavy" traffic not that ideal as we found out as we order approx 2 trucks per year (of the "heavy stuff") to keep the Main road oke for our neighbors.

 

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2 minutes ago, MJCM said:

But that said, absolutely great stuff for a low traffic road, like you showed in your pictures, but for "medium - heavy" traffic not that ideal as we found out as we order approx 2 trucks per year (of the "heavy stuff") to keep the Main road oke for our neighbors.

 

Yeah, the biggest vehicle that uses our drive is the truck delivering the rocks 🙂 

 

EDIT It's a pickup with a tipper body.

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