Jump to content

Do I need a heart check up?


davidst01
 Share

Recommended Posts

Over a year ago when back in the mother country I had an Echo test done on my heart. They found I had:

- mitral valve prolapse

- slightly enlarged aorta

- diastolic blood pressure issue the 120 over 60. the lower part of BP is not quite right apparently.

Yesterday I went to the gym, swimming at the beach, then later walking around shopping then went to the pub to see a band. 1/2 way through my beer I felt a strange feeling in my heart / chest area. Its hard to describe it to be honest. It wasnt stabbing pain but slight pain. Its happened before a month ago when I was having a beer.

I dont drink much at all these days but think now that I should not drink at all. I dont know if I should go and see a heart dr? By the time I go there is there any point as I feel fine now and its hard to even describe the pain to a Dr. I just read another post on this forum re complaint about a heart appointment he had about his mumur issue. I googled that and they did talk about mitral valve prolapse.

Also, just remembered that a few days ago at the beach I was joined by a friend and we were having a heated discussion about something and I started getting a pain in the back of my head.

This all might be nothing but thought I would seek opinions from anyone with medical knowledge.

thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you would have needed a heart check up, you will know after the check up.

If all turns out to be right...you didn't have needed it.

If something is wrong you have needed it.

No way to 100 % know it before. A slight pain can be simply nothing, a sign that you aren't 19 anymore. Or it can be the first sign of a serious problem which might not be so serious if catched in time.

So make the check up....If it is nothing you don't have to worry anymore.

If it is a problem you know it before you fall dead from the chair....

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A mitral valve prolapse if often an incidental finding which requires no treatment.

If you are concerned about your well being then arrange to see a cardiologist . An ECG + echocardiography together with a physical examination will provide the reassurance you need

More information here

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mitral-valve-prolapse/basics/symptoms/con-20024748

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Over a year ago when back in the mother country I had an Echo test done on my heart. They found I had:

- mitral valve prolapse

- slightly enlarged aorta

- diastolic blood pressure issue the 120 over 60. the lower part of BP is not quite right apparently.

Yesterday I went to the gym, swimming at the beach, then later walking around shopping then went to the pub to see a band. 1/2 way through my beer I felt a strange feeling in my heart / chest area. Its hard to describe it to be honest. It wasnt stabbing pain but slight pain. Its happened before a month ago when I was having a beer.

I dont drink much at all these days but think now that I should not drink at all. I dont know if I should go and see a heart dr? By the time I go there is there any point as I feel fine now and its hard to even describe the pain to a Dr. I just read another post on this forum re complaint about a heart appointment he had about his mumur issue. I googled that and they did talk about mitral valve prolapse.

Also, just remembered that a few days ago at the beach I was joined by a friend and we were having a heated discussion about something and I started getting a pain in the back of my head.

This all might be nothing but thought I would seek opinions from anyone with medical knowledge.

thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone with an manageable angina pectoris I don't think you should panic or run

to see the doc, keep monitoring your pains and felling's and if similar occurrences are

repeating them selves go see a doc but be prepare to under go myriad of tests some of

them not so necessary, in any case, keep some 500 mg powdered aspirin with you and

if you feel something is terribly wrong that drink that powder and check yourself to a hospital

ASAP....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it is much better to catch early then after it causes damage in the case of heart/arteries in my view. And really not much testing required if nothing wrong - if there is then a bit more and treatment; but if may save your life. In my case had no pain issues as my normal blood pressure medications apparently were enough to block. Yes we will all go sometime but if you can catch this before serious damage you may have some, or many, more years of healthy life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well now, guess it depends on how risky you are and how prepared you are to drop dead at a moment's notice. Sounds like a bit of angina to me.

Check up? Sure, if you have the means and can find a good doc. Better to have the nitro on hand, just in case.

Good luck

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well now, guess it depends on how risky you are and how prepared you are to drop dead at a moment's notice. Sounds like a bit of angina to me.

Check up? Sure, if you have the means and can find a good doc. Better to have the nitro on hand, just in case.

Good luck

If you believe it is angina it would be angina at rest otherwise known as unstable angina pectoris (UAP), not innocuous and requiring a workup.

Do you not think more information about the pain is needed? like more about character, quality, intensity 1-10 scale, associated with sob, nausea / vomiting, diaphoresis, radiation to jaw and or upper extremities, things that made it feel better or worse (posture, deep breathing) presence of point tenderness, ever happen before at rest or related to activity?

history is 90% of diagnosis is it not?

Link to post
Share on other sites

if it was a hot day and after that excerise and getting around, you had a cold beer, the pain came in the chest.....It's not your heart, I get the same. ...

Having had quad bypass previously...I really suggest you DO have a good check done, whether here or home country, and be sure.

A heart attack pain is one of it's own kind....once you have had it you will remember what it feels like....

Please have the check soon !

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is always wise to seek a check up for such a thing. The consequences of being wrong are quite unlike other parts of life. The findings you describe are not necessarily remarkable and can be found in many people, say, in their 60's and up. Diastole is the second number, the heart pressure exerted at rest. Generally, your systole and diastole are excellent- for a young man! However, it is necessary to exert a sufficient diastolic pressure to ensure proper perfusion of gases in the lung. 60 is kinda low unless remarkably fit. The pulmonary vessel system- lung heart heart lung- are intimately connected to the systemic heart functioning.

The valves prevent regurgitation and ensure full emptying from atria to ventricle, etc. prolapse has at times reduced stroke volume- CO- output. Some valvular problems are congenital and only noted later in life. If your symptomatic is key. Enough. I think you should consider whether the echo was sufficient and consider a local stress/eval. I would. (A web forum is a dangerous place from which to discern medical choices. If you have the drive to ask the question, that should suffice as the answer- yes!)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I replaced an aortic valve 18 months ago (age 44 very fit) - I get the sort of pains (and did pre surgery). Best thing is to check it out - they will re measure your heart size (and aortic chamber. If this is growing your heart will get bigger and thinner. At this stage they will intervene...best bet is to go for an echo, they will most probably tell you to come back in a year and re measure and so on until you need an intervention or simply you r heart never starts to grow. There are measures you can take to stop your heart growing, given your condition I would research them (diet, excercise intensity etc).

An MRI gives more insight but all you need is the echo cardio gram and a decent surgeon to monitor it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you do not go to a heart specialist quickly...then go to a doctor...to have your head examined...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

your blood preasure is really good, you should have a check up with the doctor though, there is a very good cardiology Doctor at the Bankok Hospital Sukhumvit road, his name is Dr.Manoon Somranthin, he will sort you out, not expensive either, if you are really worried then go and see him, he really is very good, dont know what nationality you are but his English is good. smile.png good luck smile.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is amazingly easy and quick to get a complete cardiac workup done here. I have a congenital heart defect, had open heart surgery at age 2 and require periodic cardiac monitoring. In the U.S. my annual "cardiac physical" was a giant PITA -- not from a financial standpoint (I had insurance), but just a hassle to schedule all the appointments for the echo, stress test, EKG and I used to have to have a TEE every couple years until they got much better with echos. Oh, and sometimes I had to have some sort of scan, can't remember if it was a MRI or CT, but something where I lay on an ironing board and went into a small tunnel while oldies music blared over the whirl of the machine.

Anyway, in 2006, we came to Thailand to check out retiring here. Went to Bumrungrad just to talk to a cardiologist -- no appointment. Didn't bring any medical records with me. He said he really needed to see an EKG, echo and stress test before he could address my needs. Then he said they could do all that at Bumrungrad -- that day. Total cost (at that time) was under $500. By noon, all the tests were done and I'd had my consultation with him. He wanted me to come back to talk with a cardiac surgeon because I may need surgery in the future -- right now it's a matter of watchful waiting. He was very apologetic that the surgeon wouldn't be available until 5 pm, after he was done with the day's surgery. That surgeon spent over two hours talking with me and Hubby, despite having been in surgery all day. He gave us the best understanding of my condition I've ever had, despite over 50 years of seeing cardiac doctors. (The surgeons who did my open heart surgery when I was age 2 had a little boo-boo with my tricuspid valve; I never understood that)

I took the CD of the work they did at Bumrungrad that day back to my cardiologist in Ann Arbor, Michigan for evaluation, to see if I still had to go thru the gauntlet of cardiac tests for 2006. Once he figured out how to open up the CD, he looked at their work and said the quality of the work they did at Bumrungrad was better than what the "technicians" were doing at Ann Arbor. I pointed out that all the work he saw on that CD wasn't done by "technicians" it was done by western-trained physicians. That's the norm in Thailand. He said there was no need for me to have any more cardiac exams in the U.S. and he happily wrote a nice report for me to take to Thailand.

I'd encourage the OP to get a complete cardiac work-up. That will give him a "baseline" This mitral value prolapse isn't something that's going to go away. Get a baseline now. Get the records, including a CD-rom of the scans and reports. Hold onto it. That way, if you have to go to another hospital in the future with cardiac symptoms, you'll be able to bring those records for the doctors to compare.

Such a useful and appropriate story, full of information and examples; well done. OP, you have some really useful information here by experienced people who genuinely seem to want you to choose properly. Get yourself checked out and establish that baseline. It does not sound as if the echo eval provided a comprehensive framework by which to measure.
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is always wise to seek a check up for such a thing. The consequences of being wrong are quite unlike other parts of life. The findings you describe are not necessarily remarkable and can be found in many people, say, in their 60's and up. Diastole is the second number, the heart pressure exerted at rest. Generally, your systole and diastole are excellent- for a young man! However, it is necessary to exert a sufficient diastolic pressure to ensure proper perfusion of gases in the lung. 60 is kinda low unless remarkably fit. The pulmonary vessel system- lung heart heart lung- are intimately connected to the systemic heart functioning.

The valves prevent regurgitation and ensure full emptying from atria to ventricle, etc. prolapse has at times reduced stroke volume- CO- output. Some valvular problems are congenital and only noted later in life. If your symptomatic is key. Enough. I think you should consider whether the echo was sufficient and consider a local stress/eval. I would. (A web forum is a dangerous place from which to discern medical choices. If you have the drive to ask the question, that should suffice as the answer- yes!)

Just out of curiosity would you NOT need data from a cardiac cath to get the accurate internal pressures you are likely thinking about?

Is echocardiogram not a gold standard for evaluating cardiac valves? internship 101

you mentioned regurgitation. dont you deem it important to not omit stenosis?

i never liked cardiology

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is always wise to seek a check up for such a thing. The consequences of being wrong are quite unlike other parts of life. The findings you describe are not necessarily remarkable and can be found in many people, say, in their 60's and up. Diastole is the second number, the heart pressure exerted at rest. Generally, your systole and diastole are excellent- for a young man! However, it is necessary to exert a sufficient diastolic pressure to ensure proper perfusion of gases in the lung. 60 is kinda low unless remarkably fit. The pulmonary vessel system- lung heart heart lung- are intimately connected to the systemic heart functioning.

The valves prevent regurgitation and ensure full emptying from atria to ventricle, etc. prolapse has at times reduced stroke volume- CO- output. Some valvular problems are congenital and only noted later in life. If your symptomatic is key. Enough. I think you should consider whether the echo was sufficient and consider a local stress/eval. I would. (A web forum is a dangerous place from which to discern medical choices. If you have the drive to ask the question, that should suffice as the answer- yes!)

Just out of curiosity would you NOT need data from a cardiac cath to get the accurate internal pressures you are likely thinking about?

Is echocardiogram not a gold standard for evaluating cardiac valves? internship 101

you mentioned regurgitation. dont you deem it important to not omit stenosis?

i never liked cardiology

You are correct on all counts. Basically, not enough is known about the patient, the tests previously, and the results. Stenosis? I guess I presumed the Pt was a male without double checking, and while possible, less likely. Valvular issues have a primary mANifestaion of incomplete filling/voiding. Your points confirm why NancyL was spot on- get it checked out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hellllllllllllllllooooooooooooo. We are not a doctor and you should go to hospital and get a check up, What you expect us to say and why the hell you even should listen to that. It is your health and no one can guide you. In USA and many other countries they may even sue us for misguiding you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you should see a cardiologist.

The pain may have been due to worsening mitral valve regurgitation (backflow of blood) due to the prolapse, it may have been due to a different cardiac cause (e.g. coronary artery disease, i angina or even a small infarction ("heart attack") or it may well just have been gastritis -- which can also cause chest pain and closely mimic a heart attack -- but there is no way to know just from the symptoms.

A stress test is indicated. This will not only show if the valve problem is now affecting your cardiac function but also detect any coronary artery disease. If it does suggest either of these, other tests are indicated but a simple physical exam and stress test would be usual starting point.

It is not necessary to go while you are having the pain as the effects of any structural problem (i.e. valve or CAD) will be evident on stress test.

If you advise where in Thailand you are, can suggest a cardiologist.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it is much better to catch early then after it causes damage in the case of heart/arteries in my view. And really not much testing required if nothing wrong - if there is then a bit more and treatment; but if may save your life. In my case had no pain issues as my normal blood pressure medications apparently were enough to block. Yes we will all go sometime but if you can catch this before serious damage you may have some, or many, more years of healthy life.

I had the same symptoms as the op.no pain but a heavy weight pulling on my heart,my left arm felt as if it had a half a ton of spuds hanging on it,after food I had trouble walking any distance without great discomfort.the pain in the back of the head I was told was stress,this was 2002.i put everything down on paper what I was experiencing,6months later after I had all the tests and saw a cardiologist,i had a heart murmer,which resulted in a leaking valve and blocked arteries.2007 heart surgery,

a new aota valve and a double by-pass.so its not too early to find out what could be wrong.and my bp.was no where where it should be,120/80 145,165 evan up to 200,so your appears fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact you have asked the question is an indication you are not confident about your health. Beside a possible heart problem you now have anxiety to contend with.

Why ask the forum about such things ? If you had turned off the computer & got your arse to the doctor when you first became concerned about a possible serious issue... You'd know by now.

Yes, all us males are very macho & don't run off to see the doc at every little twinge... BUT...chest pains.... silly boy.

I hope you have already been to see the doc & all is well.

Cheers..... Mal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't had a cardiac cath since I was in my thirties, but there was a time when I was having them every five years because other diagnostic tests weren't available. The key is for the OP to go see a cardiologist and ask for a complete evaluation -- the cardiologist will order the appropriate tests.

One hint for the stress test. I'm a complete oaf when it come to jogging. Normally I get my exercise by swimming and using a recumbent bike. I can't even use a regular exercise bike because I've come close to falling off a few times. I must admit that I "cram" for my cardiac annual stress test by visiting a health club a month before the event and get used to using a treadmill in gym shoes without tripping over my feet.

Edited by NancyL
Link to post
Share on other sites

As an soi walker rather than jogger or health club eye candy shopper I also feared that machine and find it extremely stressful. Mainly that it was uphill rather than flat surface really makes a big difference. But the idea is not how long you can perform but get your heartbeat into target area so you really do not have to be in much physical shape. But it is good if you can keep the feet apart and the pants up. rolleyes.gif

Believe they get a lot of there information during the cooling down period when you are just sitting on couch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

seeking death or life medical advise on a forum full of cynics ?

you are asking for it, don't you

Edited by belg
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is always wise to seek a check up for such a thing. The consequences of being wrong are quite unlike other parts of life. The findings you describe are not necessarily remarkable and can be found in many people, say, in their 60's and up. Diastole is the second number, the heart pressure exerted at rest. Generally, your systole and diastole are excellent- for a young man! However, it is necessary to exert a sufficient diastolic pressure to ensure proper perfusion of gases in the lung. 60 is kinda low unless remarkably fit. The pulmonary vessel system- lung heart heart lung- are intimately connected to the systemic heart functioning.

The valves prevent regurgitation and ensure full emptying from atria to ventricle, etc. prolapse has at times reduced stroke volume- CO- output. Some valvular problems are congenital and only noted later in life. If your symptomatic is key. Enough. I think you should consider whether the echo was sufficient and consider a local stress/eval. I would. (A web forum is a dangerous place from which to discern medical choices. If you have the drive to ask the question, that should suffice as the answer- yes!)

Just out of curiosity would you NOT need data from a cardiac cath to get the accurate internal pressures you are likely thinking about?

Is echocardiogram not a gold standard for evaluating cardiac valves? internship 101

you mentioned regurgitation. dont you deem it important to not omit stenosis?

i never liked cardiology

You are correct on all counts. Basically, not enough is known about the patient, the tests previously, and the results. Stenosis? I guess I presumed the Pt was a male without double checking, and while possible, less likely. Valvular issues have a primary mANifestaion of incomplete filling/voiding. Your points confirm why NancyL was spot on- get it checked out.

The OP seems to be male as name is david and nothing in post suggests otherwise.

As much as posters try to help i would take it with a grain of salt since we never know for sure which posts are written intentionally as bait to raise health concerns and prompt some to visit medical facilities affiliated with sponsoring forums (advertisers)

Additionally it seems some helpful posters comments may be written by writers that peroused medical webpages trying to put together an official sounding paragraph or 2 however fail to compose it in a medically succinct accurate way. some mods post very useful information, not only medically succinct but well written to the level of someone having bonafide medical expertise, or at least having been provided with a content outline.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Three and a bit years ago, the night before I was due to fly to Bangkok, I went to emergency at Royal Melbourne because of a pressure pain in the middle of my chest. It had been around periodically for 3 or 4 nights for 30 or 40 minutes. On this night is was persistent. I was checked and admitted. Had a quadruple bypass a couple of days later. I did not want to make a fuss, so I had put it off a bit. I urge you, either for your heart or for your peace of mind, to get it checked out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the posts are completely speculative, ignorant and irresponsible. TV members are experts in certain fields but for cardiac problems you need a specialist.

OP the only advice you should listen to here is get your ass to a cardiac specialist NOW!!!

Now if your problem was prostate or ED I can't think of anywhere better to get advice than TV!!!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...