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Pension and healthcare


Airbagwill

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A foreigner working in Thailand for any other company would expect a housing package, resettlement and healthcare. If you are going to work long term, you would either arrange your own pension or expect the company to offer some deal.

 

However it appears that ESl teachers fall outside this.

They receive wages that are below the government minimum for foreigners and have absolutely no benefits package.

surely this must contribute to the low standard of English in Thailand?

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On 9/13/2020 at 1:22 PM, Airbagwill said:

A foreigner working in Thailand for any other company would expect a housing package, resettlement and healthcare. If you are going to work long term, you would either arrange your own pension or expect the company to offer some deal.

 

However it appears that ESl teachers fall outside this.

They receive wages that are below the government minimum for foreigners and have absolutely no benefits package.

surely this must contribute to the low standard of English in Thailand?

Maybe just incorrect posts on here are the main problem.

 

Teachers at government schools become members of the Thai social security scheme. This scheme offers health care, unemployment benefit and payments after the age of 55, albeit minimal.

 

To be honest, anyone depending on government pensions in any country is foolish. I believe that everyone should also make their own provisions for retirement.

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If working for a government school you will be enrolled under the Social Security scheme which provides comprehensive cover.

 

If at a private school, they are uniquely exempt from the Thai Social Security scheme and free to opt out in favor of their own "health insurance" schemes which are indeed usually worthless. I have known people to reach the maximum benefit within 24 hours of admission and then be stuck with all the rest. Might be better at the top international schools (or perhaps they opt into SS) but not at most.

 

If at a private school, get the details of the health insurance offered. It will almost always be insufficient (you need at least 3 million baht cover). In which case you should get your own policy.

 

If under SS there is a pension provision. Not under SS, doubtful.

 

Private schools in Thailand are not known for good salaries or benefits. They get away with low salaries or minimal benefits because a lot of people are anxious to live in Thailand. Again, the handful of top tier international schools  differ -- but jobs at those are very, very competitive.

 

 

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All teachers at private & international schools are excluded from socisl security. After they were allowed not to contribute they were supposed to put something in place but few do. I only know of a couple of international schools that offer a pension/provident fund. The majority that don't have pensions argue they have a bonus in lieu of pension. However that's not really an argument as a bonus doesn't have to be paid as its dependent on performance. The fact that international& private schools don't offer a bonus is a bit naughty as they pay zero corporation tax. The finance ministry had proposed making the probident fund compulsary for all companies but it wouldn't surprise mevif schools were excluded ????

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About private schools not offering social security: I have been a teacher for four years at the same school now, two of which have been with SS. I did have to ask about getting it, in lieu of my previous AIA package, but I did get it and so did my foreign colleagues.

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On 9/15/2020 at 12:00 AM, Airbagwill said:

To make your own arrangements, you need enough salary to do so and the long term security to do this 

It seems that the deal offered to teachers in Thailand is really pretty poor .....well below the market norm.

A great plus is the Thai social security and the benefits already mentioned by another poster.

 

Once you've paid into the SS, you can continue privately, and you have full hospital coverage. And that for only 438 baht.

 

  If you've worked 25 years, or even less, you'll get a pension when you're 60, which isn't much, or you can get all money back that was paid in from the employer and you.

 

  But if you're planning to stay in Thailand, you should never give up the Thai SS. It's worth a lot. Usually, older people get sick more often. 

 

  

 

 

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On 9/16/2020 at 12:12 PM, Sheryl said:

If working for a government school you will be enrolled under the Social Security scheme which provides comprehensive cover.

 

If at a private school, they are uniquely exempt from the Thai Social Security scheme and free to opt out in favor of their own "health insurance" schemes which are indeed usually worthless. I have known people to reach the maximum benefit within 24 hours of admission and then be stuck with all the rest. Might be better at the top international schools (or perhaps they opt into SS) but not at most.

 

If at a private school, get the details of the health insurance offered. It will almost always be insufficient (you need at least 3 million baht cover). In which case you should get your own policy.

 

If under SS there is a pension provision. Not under SS, doubtful.

 

Private schools in Thailand are not known for good salaries or benefits. They get away with low salaries or minimal benefits because a lot of people are anxious to live in Thailand. Again, the handful of top tier international schools  differ -- but jobs at those are very, very competitive.

 

 

Yep, they get away with low salaries and a heavy teaching load. 

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32 minutes ago, teacherclaire said:

A great plus is the Thai social security and the benefits already mentioned by another poster.

 

Once you've paid into the SS, you can continue privately, and you have full hospital coverage. And that for only 438 baht.

 

  If you've worked 25 years, or even less, you'll get a pension when you're 60, which isn't much, or you can get all money back that was paid in from the employer and you.

 

  But if you're planning to stay in Thailand, you should never give up the Thai SS. It's worth a lot. Usually, older people get sick more often. 

 

  

 

 

432 baht a month. You can get this after paying into the system for a year. You can claim the pension at 55 or a lump sum. I think 15 years is the minimum needed to get the pension every month. 

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On 9/16/2020 at 12:19 AM, Big Guns said:

All teachers at private & international schools are excluded from socisl security.

 

They are not excluded, they can go under it if they want. But it is not mandatory for them, whereas it is for most other employers.

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  • 3 years later...
On 9/18/2020 at 12:55 PM, Sheryl said:

 

They are not excluded, they can go under it if they want. But it is not mandatory for them, whereas it is for most other employers.

Hi Sheryl,

 

Sorry to dig up this old thread, but I have a question directly relating to your point here.

 

I have worked at a private international school for the past 5 years. The school has always opted to enroll all staff into the Social Security scheme, even though I understand that they are not required to do so, as they are a private school. This is in addition to a school private health insurance plan. 

 

However, now they have informed us that there has been a decision by the Social Security Office that from now on, only non-teaching Thai and Burmese staff will be allowed to contribute to the scheme. Foreign teachers will no longer be allowed to contribute.

 

Are you aware of any changes to SS policy? Or is it likely that the school has made the decision to stop paying into the scheme?

 

I have contacted the head office in Bangkok and am awaiting a reply. I would really like to continue SS coverage, as it is quite likely that I will retire in Thailand. I have already enquired about changing from Section 33 to Section 39 to pay into SS directly myself, but was informed that I can only do this if I am no longer working (must show an expired/cancelled work permit).

 

Any info or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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7 minutes ago, SideOut said:

Hi Sheryl,

 

Sorry to dig up this old thread, but I have a question directly relating to your point here.

 

I have worked at a private international school for the past 5 years. The school has always opted to enroll all staff into the Social Security scheme, even though I understand that they are not required to do so, as they are a private school. This is in addition to a school private health insurance plan. 

 

However, now they have informed us that there has been a decision by the Social Security Office that from now on, only non-teaching Thai and Burmese staff will be allowed to contribute to the scheme. Foreign teachers will no longer be allowed to contribute.

 

Are you aware of any changes to SS policy? Or is it likely that the school has made the decision to stop paying into the scheme?

 

I have contacted the head office in Bangkok and am awaiting a reply. I would really like to continue SS coverage, as it is quite likely that I will retire in Thailand. I have already enquired about changing from Section 33 to Section 39 to pay into SS directly myself, but was informed that I can only do this if I am no longer working (must show an expired/cancelled work permit).

 

Any info or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

I have not heard anything of the sort and it would be quite contrary to the terms of the Social Security Act which makes no distinctions by nationality.

 

I think this is  decision by the school. You are quite right that you should try to stay under SS since you plan on retiring in Thailand.

 

See what head office says but meanwhile might want to look around at other job opportunities that would keep you under SS.

 

 

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On 6/13/2024 at 11:17 AM, Sheryl said:

I have not heard anything of the sort and it would be quite contrary to the terms of the Social Security Act which makes no distinctions by nationality.

 

I think this is  decision by the school. You are quite right that you should try to stay under SS since you plan on retiring in Thailand.

 

See what head office says but meanwhile might want to look around at other job opportunities that would keep you under SS.

 

 

Hi Sheryl,

 

Thank you for the reply. That was my initial suspicion as well. I've had several back and forth messages with the head SS office in Bangkok to try and get a direct answer. Below are some of the replies from the officer. As you can see, according to what they have written, it seems I was never supposed to be allowed to be insured under Section 33 to begin with. I asked them several times directly if my school could choose to continue paying into SS for teachers, but their answer never seemed to directly answer that question. Instead, the officer kept coming back to the point that private school teachers are not allowed to be enrolled. 

 

Here are some snippets of the officer's replies for your reference:

 

"In the case an employee is an individual primarily engaged in teaching duties (including international schools), they will not be able to register as insured persons under Section 33."

 

 "SSO Contact center 1506 wishes to thank you for your interest in our services, we would like to inform you that
The Private School Act (No. 2) 2011, came into effect on June 10, 2011. It stipulates that employees of the following entities must register as insured persons under Section 33:
- All non-teaching staff in non-system schools
- Individuals not primarily involved in teaching or supporting the educational activities of the school within the system (including international schools)
- Educational personnel of international schools, provided they were previously insured under Section 33 of the Social Security Act 1990 and have contributed supplementary funds before January 12, 2008, according to the Private School Act 2007 (Amendment No. 2) 2011, Section 86."

 

  "SSO Contact center 1506 wishes to thank you for your interest in our services, we would like to inform you that in case employee primarily engages in teaching duties (including those at international schools), they will not be able to register as insured persons under Section 33 due to not following the criteria and conditions for registering an employee/insured person under Section 33."

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OK so nothing to do with nationality.

 

It seems that there is now supposed to be something called a Private School Trachers Welfare Fund.  I don't know the details. Perhaps others on this forum could advise?

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On 9/15/2020 at 12:00 AM, Airbagwill said:

To make your own arrangements, you need enough salary to do so and the long term security to do this 

It seems that the deal offered to teachers in Thailand is really pretty poor .....well below the market norm.

 

May I ask what these thousands of teachers bring to their jobs ? After years of watching the childish antics I'd say absolutely nothing. 80% of teachers in Thailand act like teenagers working their first job.

 

Thailand is no better off with fake foreign teachers. Onet clearly spell this out.

 

We see students with a decade of English classes but cannot hold a conversation. Can no longer blame Thailand or the system.

 

36k to start is great pay for this lot.

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On 6/15/2024 at 3:35 PM, SideOut said:

Hi Sheryl,

 

Thank you for the reply. That was my initial suspicion as well. I've had several back and forth messages with the head SS office in Bangkok to try and get a direct answer. Below are some of the replies from the officer. As you can see, according to what they have written, it seems I was never supposed to be allowed to be insured under Section 33 to begin with. I asked them several times directly if my school could choose to continue paying into SS for teachers, but their answer never seemed to directly answer that question. Instead, the officer kept coming back to the point that private school teachers are not allowed to be enrolled. 

 

Here are some snippets of the officer's replies for your reference:

 

"In the case an employee is an individual primarily engaged in teaching duties (including international schools), they will not be able to register as insured persons under Section 33."

 

 "SSO Contact center 1506 wishes to thank you for your interest in our services, we would like to inform you that
The Private School Act (No. 2) 2011, came into effect on June 10, 2011. It stipulates that employees of the following entities must register as insured persons under Section 33:
- All non-teaching staff in non-system schools
- Individuals not primarily involved in teaching or supporting the educational activities of the school within the system (including international schools)
- Educational personnel of international schools, provided they were previously insured under Section 33 of the Social Security Act 1990 and have contributed supplementary funds before January 12, 2008, according to the Private School Act 2007 (Amendment No. 2) 2011, Section 86."

 

  "SSO Contact center 1506 wishes to thank you for your interest in our services, we would like to inform you that in case employee primarily engages in teaching duties (including those at international schools), they will not be able to register as insured persons under Section 33 due to not following the criteria and conditions for registering an employee/insured person under Section 33."

 

I was able to continue to pay into SSO while working at a private school.

 

I'm not so certain this was a good idea. Seems to he catch 22 actually getting onto the SSO proper. One requirement is name in a house book and Thai ID. Call center said I could perhaps use passport in lieu of Thai ID. House book is an issue. I will learn more today

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On 9/13/2020 at 6:58 PM, Madgee said:

1 - None (unless you marry one of the teachers)

2 - First Aid Box (broken lid and no band-aids)

 

P.S. The school nurse is quite hot!   ???? She 's good at rubbing it better. 

 

 

R u a "teacher" ?

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On 9/13/2020 at 6:58 PM, Madgee said:

1 - None (unless you marry one of the teachers)

2 - First Aid Box (broken lid and no band-aids)

 

P.S. The school nurse is quite hot!   ???? She 's good at rubbing it better. 

 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, Ben Zioner said:

R u a "teacher" ?


Another one is void of a sense of humour!

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On 6/17/2024 at 6:20 AM, BusNo8 said:

 

I was able to continue to pay into SSO while working at a private school.

 

I'm not so certain this was a good idea. Seems to he catch 22 actually getting onto the SSO proper. One requirement is name in a house book and Thai ID. Call center said I could perhaps use passport in lieu of Thai ID. House book is an issue. I will learn more today

Hi BusNo8,

 

Thanks for the reply Do you mind clarifying a few points?

 

Do you mean that you had SS before working at the private school and then were able to continue your coverage while you worked there? If so, was the school making the payments for you out of your salary, or did you have to arrange direct payment to the SS office yourself?

 

Or, do you mean that you had SS coverage while working at the private school, but you no longer work there and you are going to try to continue SS coverage by trying to set up direct payment?

 

Or, neither of the above? 🙂 Sorry for all the questions; I'm just trying to understand your situation to see if can add any clarity to my own. Thanks.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, SideOut said:

Hi BusNo8,

 

Thanks for the reply Do you mind clarifying a few points?

 

Do you mean that you had SS before working at the private school and then were able to continue your coverage while you worked there? If so, was the school making the payments for you out of your salary, or did you have to arrange direct payment to the SS office yourself?

 

Or, do you mean that you had SS coverage while working at the private school, but you no longer work there and you are going to try to continue SS coverage by trying to set up direct payment?

 

Or, neither of the above? 🙂 Sorry for all the questions; I'm just trying to understand your situation to see if can add any clarity to my own. Thanks.

 

 

 

I had SSO insurance prior to working at the private school. The school continued to make contributions out of my salary for 5 years.

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I think it's no problem to get SS if you're working at a private school. You can make the arrangement yourself with someone from the school helping you.

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On 6/22/2024 at 11:12 PM, DavisH said:

Are you one of these fake teachers you speak of? Your English is horrendous! The VAST majority of Thai students study under Thai teachers and NOT foreign teachers. Poor O-Net results have nothing to do with foreign teachers. 

He probably doesn't teach in Thailand at all, as anyone who does would know that foreign teachers aren't going to influence the national ONET results.

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21 hours ago, SlyAnimal said:

He probably doesn't teach in Thailand at all, as anyone who does would know that foreign teachers aren't going to influence the national ONET results.

 

They certainly do at the schools in which they teach. That's all EP, IP programs as well as accelerated English. Not where most of you lot teach at 35k.

 

It's so funny, the defense. I've known the better part of 100 teachers in greater Bangkok. I presume BKK is the best of the lot. I would hire only about 5-10%. You all know this well. Call the truth and insult to avoid confronting it as fact.

 

Note: all *teachers* jump in, get hostile and defensive because it's really do true. Teachers never own up to their failures. It's not a requirement of the job. That's why it's so appealing especially overseas.

 

Not meaning to hijack thread.

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5 hours ago, BusNo8 said:

 

They certainly do at the schools in which they teach. That's all EP, IP programs as well as accelerated English. Not where most of you lot teach at 35k.

 

It's so funny, the defense. I've known the better part of 100 teachers in greater Bangkok. I presume BKK is the best of the lot. I would hire only about 5-10%. You all know this well. Call the truth and insult to avoid confronting it as fact.

 

Note: all *teachers* jump in, get hostile and defensive because it's really do true. Teachers never own up to their failures. It's not a requirement of the job. That's why it's so appealing especially overseas.

 

Not meaning to hijack thread.

Your lack of knowledge, as highlighted in the above post, has rendered all you say inane, and proved your posts to be nothing but baseless rants. 

 

Never mind. 555

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