Jump to content

Benefits of an International School


Recommended Posts

My girl is attending an English Program school with of course English, English science and English Math. Together with Thai math, Thai science and Computer class in Thai. In my mind the Thai classes for the most part are a waste of time. Especially with online learning I see that so many of her Thai classes are art projects instead of actual learning. 

 

The nearby International School teaches all subjects in English. To me math is extremely important and would be better taught in one English class vs. one English and another lesson in Thai. Same for Science. Thai history is good but what I see them doing is mainly art projects.

 

If we're planning on her attending Thai university is The International Curriculum beneficial?  The cost of International school is triple the money would something I could absorb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If she is going to go to a Thai University, then I would keep her in a program which also includes Thai language.  It is not just the language that is important but the linguistic terminology, usage of terms and other aspects that are important.  

 

I used to teach a group of engineers for a number of years.  They decided after a few years to pursue a Master's program.   They books they used were in English (although the course I believe was conducted in Thai).   I remember one of them bringing in a portion of the text and asked if I could help him.  He said, "I understand every word in the text, but I have no idea what it means."  

International schools are generally superior to Thai schools but I wouldn't stretch my resources if she is going to remain local.   Learning in both languages is probably in her best interest.   

 

Best of luck.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting topic.  My kid (6) goes to international school but I'm thinking of changing to a "good" bilingual school as his Thai is not good, and the cost is substantially less.  However, as he's not Thai (his mother is Laotian) he might end up back in the UK when he's older, so this could be a mistake!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, brewsterbudgen said:

Interesting topic.  My kid (6) goes to international school but I'm thinking of changing to a "good" bilingual school as his Thai is not good, and the cost is substantially less.  However, as he's not Thai (his mother is Laotian) he might end up back in the UK when he's older, so this could be a mistake!

Yes its a difficult decision. My daughter is 13 and been going to an International school here since she was 4 years old, her Thai is useless, to the point that she really cannot speak any at all when in public. However she will be going to the UK to study at UNI there and then we are not sure if she will stay there with our extended family or return.

 

If it was certain that she was going to stay in Thailand then I also would suggest a 'good' bi lingual school.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Daughter just finished Uni.  Went to private school (Thai) before Uni (Thammasat), which she had her choice of.  English was the only language allowed in the house, along with watching English language movies, so she was fluent in English, even winning English competitions at school, inter-province competitions also.

 

Thai fluent, simply from school & friend, along with Isan from family, and English (American version), from myself & movies.   Thinking English would be a priority for working for an international company.  I was thinking tourism / travel industry (pre-covid of course) would be an easy in and advancement with international chain, better pay & opportunities.

 

Thankfully she dissed that suggestion, and went into marketing.  Interned at Lazada.  Offered job at LAZ & Shopee, but passed to start her own business.

 

Point of post, one thing she regrets, is not learning Chinese, as the better paying jobs at LAZ offered were for those fluent in Chinese.  So if any marketing or international business in her future, I'd stick with a good Thai private school, as long as she gets her English elsewhere, and have Chinese as an extra learning opportunity, if headed into any international (better paying) businesses after Uni.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, brewsterbudgen said:

Interesting topic.  My kid (6) goes to international school but I'm thinking of changing to a "good" bilingual school as his Thai is not good, and the cost is substantially less.  However, as he's not Thai (his mother is Laotian) he might end up back in the UK when he's older, so this could be a mistake!

I usually recommended to parents that if they planned, and were reasonably sure of their plan and had the financial resources, to send their child to University in an English-speaking country, then go with an international school.  If they thought they 'might' go to school in an English speaking country, they might be best to go with a good, strong bilingual program.  

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Scott said:

I usually recommended to parents that if they planned, and were reasonably sure of their plan and had the financial resources, to send their child to University in an English-speaking country, then go with an international school.  If they thought they 'might' go to school in an English speaking country, they might be best to go with a good, strong bilingual program.  

I've had a number of students from my EP who go on to International programs in Thailand. many of those go overseas to students higher degrees with no problems. There were also some who directly went overseas after the EP. They enter those programs as International students - so for most courses the entry requirements are not that stringent. My son is just finshing up m6 now and just did his IELTS and got 7.5 (Think he was a bit disappointed, but he is still a native Thai speaker, despite him speaking English at home). He plans to study in an Inter program here (he's still undecided on what to do). Then he could do futher study have in Australia if he chooses to. The vast majority of students from my EP over the past have wanted to student in English in university - the ones who didn't generally wanted to study medicine, and had to spend considerale time in cram schools to pass the exams in Thai. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, DavisH said:

I've had a number of students from my EP who go on to International programs in Thailand. many of those go overseas to students higher degrees with no problems. There were also some who directly went overseas after the EP. They enter those programs as International students - so for most courses the entry requirements are not that stringent. My son is just finshing up m6 now and just did his IELTS and got 7.5 (Think he was a bit disappointed, but he is still a native Thai speaker, despite him speaking English at home). He plans to study in an Inter program here (he's still undecided on what to do). Then he could do futher study have in Australia if he chooses to. The vast majority of students from my EP over the past have wanted to student in English in university - the ones who didn't generally wanted to study medicine, and had to spend considerale time in cram schools to pass the exams in Thai. 

I have remained friends with many of the students I taught in a bilingual program.  Most are now adults with their own children, some of whom are now at the same school, so I guess I am sort of a grand(father) teacher for them!   I can't give you exact numbers but I would guess that close to 10% of them eventually ended up overseas, either getting their Bachelor's Degree or for their Master's.   A bilingual education gives them the advantage of being able to function in either or both.  

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

no expert but follow the Finland Model.

no formal schooling until aged seven. waste of time and money.

by age 10 the age 7 starters have caught & surpassed the age 4 starters.

separate Thai Language study from all else which must be Western / English. asap get the child to english - speaking country for college/uni.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the replies, after covid travel becomes easier I'll begin taking my daughter to US for short trips yearly and I can gauge how she likes it. I could financially swing college in the USA, she shows a keen interest for things outside of Thailand. Me personally I feel a young person armed with the best education in Thailand can be successful. As time goes on I'll be seeking more information about the International programs at Unis in Thailand.

 

With the online learning I became more aware of the make work and art work in her Thai classes. I'm sure things will improve once in class learning begins. Again thanks for the well thought out replies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, EVENKEEL said:

Thank you for all the replies, after covid travel becomes easier I'll begin taking my daughter to US for short trips yearly and I can gauge how she likes it. I could financially swing college in the USA, she shows a keen interest for things outside of Thailand. Me personally I feel a young person armed with the best education in Thailand can be successful. As time goes on I'll be seeking more information about the International programs at Unis in Thailand.

 

With the online learning I became more aware of the make work and art work in her Thai classes. I'm sure things will improve once in class learning begins. Again thanks for the well thought out replies.

Good luck. Just be aware of the burden of US college fees. I think gainining education from multiple countires is beneficial for future employment. My wife did her degree + masters in Thailand (in Thai), but her PhD in Australia. Any Thai who has studied overseas is held in very high regard, so usually they can secure work very easily if they return home. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...