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One rai of garden out in the boonies......any suggestions?


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Land is topped off, looks like good soil, nice and level.

 

I am looking for a simple, relatively low cost, low maintenance garden.  

 

Even if your idea is 100% 'grass' or what passes for grass here, can you advise what type how to sow it/lay it?

 

Crossed my mind to do part of the garden as a zen type thing, gravel and boulders!

 

If you have any photos of what you have done that would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by Will B Good
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You must determine local pests. For example, I found out our new house in Nonthaburi was built upon riverfill clay. Along with that clay fill came a million snails, which eat almost everything but I have learned that certain plants are impervious to their efforts.

 

I would vote for the zen, called xeriscaping. Low water requirements, low maintenance. Cactus, red button ginger, thick ,waxy leafed plantings. I'm in process of planning conversion of our lawn and garden area this year.

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3 minutes ago, tonray said:

You must determine local pests. For example, I found out our new house in Nonthaburi was built upon riverfill clay. Along with that clay fill came a million snails, which eat almost everything but I have learned that certain plants are impervious to their efforts.

 

I would vote for the zen, called xeriscaping. Low water requirements, low maintenance. Cactus, red button ginger, thick ,waxy leafed plantings. I'm in process of planning conversion of our lawn and garden area this year.

Wow...thanks for that.

 

I was watching a Japanese channel recently showcasing these gardens (xeriscaping.....a new word for me) they look the like the dogs..........going to give that some serious consideration.

 

Cheers.

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A lot depends where you live and what soil type. I'm close to the beach, the ground is very sandy. I started with Nor Noi grass and it struggled.

 

Then Malaysian grass ( never planted any at this point) started to take a healthy hold. I then added some Malaysian grass turfs in different places and it didn't take long to take over. I'm no grass expert but apparently Malaysian grass is quite hardy and can take to sandy soil. It does like water though. 

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8 minutes ago, sungod said:

A lot depends where you live and what soil type. I'm close to the beach, the ground is very sandy. I started with Nor Noi grass and it struggled.

 

Then Malaysian grass ( never planted any at this point) started to take a healthy hold. I then added some Malaysian grass turfs in different places and it didn't take long to take over. I'm no grass expert but apparently Malaysian grass is quite hardy and can take to sandy soil. It does like water though. 

Thanks for that.....we are in the middle of the rice bowl.....north of Chaiyaphum.......no expert, but the soil looks a rich, red color and it seems like good soil. Water is not a problem.

 

Would you recommend sowing or turfing?

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Don't touch it, let natural ecology take over,

it becomes your little personal carbon offset.

A true Zen.

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1 minute ago, talahtnut said:

Don't touch it, let natural ecology take over,

it becomes your little personal carbon offset.

A true Zen.

Tried that avenue.....got short shrift off the wife....so now have to do something with it....555

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Depends on whether you want a garden that is mostly ornamental or do you want it filled with things you can eat.

 

Thais tend to favour the latter. Our garden has plenty of edible fruits , a vegetable plot, ornamental stream with rock garden, lawn area, graveled parts ..etc. A mix that is nice to look at but also produces some food.

 

Get on the computer, download a gardening app then sit down together and design it.

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19 minutes ago, Will B Good said:

Thanks for that.....we are in the middle of the rice bowl.....north of Chaiyaphum.......no expert, but the soil looks a rich, red color and it seems like good soil. Water is not a problem.

 

Would you recommend sowing or turfing?

Turf is more instantaneous, seed takes a lot more time and maintenance in the early stages.

 

If it were me, I would turf.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Denim said:

Depends on whether you want a garden that is mostly ornamental or do you want it filled with things you can eat.

 

Thais tend to favour the latter. Our garden has plenty of edible fruits , a vegetable plot, ornamental stream with rock garden, lawn area, graveled parts ..etc. A mix that is nice to look at but also produces some food.

 

Get on the computer, download a gardening app then sit down together and design it.

Cheers.

 

The wife certainly has her heart set on growing anything edible, but I am going to leave her to it. She can have her own plot. I like a nice garden to look at, but not overly keen on the work needed to make it look nice.....555

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3 minutes ago, phetphet said:

Might be a good idea to consider some trees for shade.

Yes.....near, but not too near, the house to take the edge of the heat.....like it.

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14 minutes ago, Will B Good said:

Yes.....near, but not too near, the house to take the edge of the heat.....like it.

Another thing if water is not a problem might be to install a small bore pipe irrigation system. Save having to get the hose and watering can out.

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3 minutes ago, phetphet said:

Another thing if water is not a problem might be to install a small bore pipe irrigation system. Save having to get the hose and watering can out.

Was thinking the same on a rai

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You really want to start planting some shade trees around the boundaries as the first priority. Get established saplings (2 metre tall). You want to be able to walk around your property in the shade.

 

Concentrate on the western facing boundaries (where the sun sets). Look to plant some tall, fast growing shade trees. Maybe look at a line of trees 15 metres west of your house. The idea is for your house to be in shade for the last hour or two of the afternoon and to stop the late afternoon sun hitting your house walls.

 

Shade also discourages weeds and undergrowth (particularly nuisance weeds with thorns or sticky seeds) which best thrive under full sun.

 

I'm in Isan and there are quite a few suitable trees. Hopefully, a nursery can advise.

 

Don't rely on your wife. I did that and wasted a few years on shrubs and non-suitable trees before getting back on track. Thais prefer trees that bear edible fruit or have spectacular flowers. Preference trees that put all their energy into growing and with plenty of leaves, 

 

I made the mistake (on the advice of my wife) of buying the cheapest plants. Go for grafted quality stuff. This is especially the case with mango trees which can also be good shade trees.

 

Malaysian grass does not do so well in full sun unless you can water it frequently. It does best with partial shade. I put a square foot of the turf at the base of new plants around my property knowing it would get watered as I watered the plants. As the trees have grown, the grass has spread far and wide.

 

Finally, you will want a fish pond. This could be the centre piece of your garden and you can plan around this.

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1 hour ago, Will B Good said:

I like a nice garden to look at, but not overly keen on the work needed to make it look nice.....555

Ha ha. In that case , gravel and concrete are your friends.

 

In many of Thailands ancient city parks they make footpaths from red bricks set in concrete. Looks good and zero maintenance. You would be amazed how much hard graft is involved in keeping a garden presentable. In the rainy season weeds go ballistic and in the hot seasons lawns can die unless well watered. Mango trees start small but in a few years can get huge and growing anything in their shadow is difficult. Mine are so big that i plan to concrete and red brick under them when more important projects are finished. After one rainy season the red bricks and concrete get covered in fungus and look suitably aged and rustic.

 

My wife wanted half the garden given over to vegetable garden. Recognising her as a bona fide couch potato I gave her 25 % where I now grow those vegetables that are easiest to grow. Long beans are dead easy and make great bean soup.

To be fair she did a good job on our two limes and we get so many we give a lot away.

More papaya  than we can handle. 

 

Squirrels had all the coconuts

but I did get two dozen coconut cakes from their pulp.

Never thought I would like gardening but slowly and inexorably I have become an old fart.. Tragic demise of a hard drinking monger.

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10 minutes ago, Stevemercer said:

You really want to start planting some shade trees around the boundaries as the first priority. Get established saplings (2 metre tall). You want to be able to walk around your property in the shade.

 

Concentrate on the western facing boundaries (where the sun sets). Look to plant some tall, fast growing shade trees. Maybe look at a line of trees 15 metres west of your house. The idea is for your house to be in shade for the last hour or two of the afternoon and to stop the late afternoon sun hitting your house walls.

 

Shade also discourages weeds and undergrowth (particularly nuisance weeds with thorns or sticky seeds) which best thrive under full sun.

 

I'm in Isan and there are quite a few suitable trees. Hopefully, a nursery can advise.

 

Don't rely on your wife. I did that and wasted a few years on shrubs and non-suitable trees before getting back on track. Thais prefer trees that bear edible fruit or have spectacular flowers. Preference trees that put all their energy into growing and with plenty of leaves, 

 

I made the mistake (on the advice of my wife) of buying the cheapest plants. Go for grafted quality stuff. This is especially the case with mango trees which can also be good shade trees.

 

Malaysian grass does not do so well in full sun unless you can water it frequently. It does best with partial shade. I put a square foot of the turf at the base of new plants around my property knowing it would get watered as I watered the plants. As the trees have grown, the grass has spread far and wide.

 

Finally, you will want a fish pond. This could be the centre piece of your garden and you can plan around this.

Wow thanks for that......there are some trees on the boundary, but not enough to give any real shade.

 

Will look into all that and trying to shade the house as much as possible.

 

Cheers.

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8 minutes ago, Denim said:

Ha ha. In that case , gravel and concrete are your friends.

 

In many of Thailands ancient city parks they make footpaths from red bricks set in concrete. Looks good and zero maintenance. You would be amazed how much hard graft is involved in keeping a garden presentable. In the rainy season weeds go ballistic and in the hot seasons lawns can die unless well watered. Mango trees start small but in a few years can get huge and growing anything in their shadow is difficult. Mine are so big that i plan to concrete and red brick under them when more important projects are finished. After one rainy season the red bricks and concrete get covered in fungus and look suitably aged and rustic.

 

My wife wanted half the garden given over to vegetable garden. Recognising her as a bona fide couch potato I gave her 25 % where I now grow those vegetables that are easiest to grow. Long beans are dead easy and make great bean soup.

To be fair she did a good job on our two limes and we get so many we give a lot away.

More papaya  than we can handle. 

 

Squirrels had all the coconuts

but I did get two dozen coconut cakes from their pulp.

Never thought I would like gardening but slowly and inexorably I have become an old fart.. Tragic demise of a hard drinking monger.

Can see my wife setting off all enthusiastic and then muggins having to take over and do the hard graft....555

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I planted coconut trees along one of the perimeter walls of my garden. They are good for shade and also for the coconut harvest. Nothing better than a nice refreshing coconut milk drink and it's healthy too. It took 6-7 years before we started getting a good crop of coconuts. I've got about 8 trees producing similar crops to the one in the picture. Pretty easy to grow, even in low quality soil. Other fruits easily grown are bananas, papaya, lamyai, guava, jackfruit, limes and of course mangoes.

 

 

IMG_25650124_080942.jpg

Edited by Mutt Daeng
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I've got 4 different mango trees in my front garden.

They produce more than we can eat, give nice shade and hardly any work.

Don't park your car under them, they drip sticky stuff.

2 years to produce.

 

Bananas are fairly easy as well.

Produce the same year as planted.

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11 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

I've got 4 different mango trees in my front garden.

They produce more than we can eat, give nice shade and hardly any work.

Don't park your car under them, they drip sticky stuff.

2 years to produce.

 

Bananas are fairly easy as well.

Produce the same year as planted.

Good tip about not parking cars/bikes under the mango trees. The resin is really nasty stuff to remove.

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