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Missing in Action: WWII US airman's remains finally reunited with family after 78 years


webfact
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48 minutes ago, webfact said:

The unnamed pilot was identified after locals found remains of a downed aircraft in Lampang, northern Thailand some years ago.

Not yet identified. A much better, fuller coherent story available here:

 https://www.militarytimes.com/veterans/2022/05/18/thai-archival-find-may-resolve-fate-of-missing-wwii-us-pilot/#:~:text=U-TAPAO%2C Thailand — The,flood-threatened archives in Thailand.

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39 minutes ago, ThailandRyan said:

Wow an honest to goodness Flying Tiger.  They were the heroes of the day back then.  Many were volunteers. They were also known as the AVG

https://militaryhistorynow.com/2017/09/14/the-flying-tigers-12-amazing-facts-about-americas-famous-volunteer-fighter-squadron/

The crash apparently is from 1944, two years after the Flying Tigers ceased operations. And Flying Tigers piloted P40s, not P38s, which is what this plane was. 

Quote

 It was a handwritten police officer’s report dated November 1944. It detailed the crash of a U.S. P-38 plane, reported to have been struck by lightning during a storm.

 https://www.militarytimes.com/veterans/2022/05/18/thai-archival-find-may-resolve-fate-of-missing-wwii-us-pilot/#:~:text=U-TAPAO%2C Thailand — The,flood-threatened archives in Thailand.

 

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42 minutes ago, John Drake said:

The crash apparently is from 1944, two years after the Flying Tigers ceased operations. And Flying Tigers piloted P40s, not P38s, which is what this plane was. 

 

I did not read the article in its entirety as I wanted to believe the headline tag, but after reading one of your links it was indeed an aha moment much like the museum archive docent who found the initial file after checking all to ensure none were damaged by a flood that had inundated the museum.  I also found that it was not just a regular P-38 but the plane was an F-5E, which was a P-38 stripped down and modified for reconnaissance duty.  

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1 minute ago, ThailandRyan said:

I did not read the article in its entirety as I wanted to believe the headline tag, but after reading one of your links it was indeed an aha moment much like the museum archive docent who found the initial file after checking all to ensure none were damaged by a flood that had inundated the museum.  I also found that it was not just a regular P-38 but the plane was an F-5E, which was a P-38 stripped down and modified for reconnaissance duty.  

Yes, it's actually a fascinating story. The Military Times article makes it all come to life. And good to see credit going to the RTAF Museum. I haven't been there in about six years, but the people running it then were very pleasant, eager, and helpful. Lots of Vietnam era aircraft you can walk right up to or into. Old WW II aircraft used in Vietnam, such as a Douglas Skyraider. They had Ravens' Bird Dogs, a C123, and I even remember seeing a Spitfire parked out for exhibition. There is a lot of drama in this story and the OP doesn't do it justice.

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

The return of the remains To Honolulu, Hawaii, will help bring closure after 78 years.

Which is a good thing, irrelevant of the reasons for the crash.

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6 hours ago, John Drake said:

Thanks, reposted on my FB wall ...

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Well, what was the US air force doing in this part of the world during WW2?

82,000 MIAs Americans; anybody ever counted the MIAs of the Indochina desaster and I mean Indochinese (Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese) MIAs? 

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59 minutes ago, Sydebolle said:

Well, what was the US air force doing in this part of the world during WW2?

82,000 MIAs Americans; anybody ever counted the MIAs of the Indochina desaster and I mean Indochinese (Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese) MIAs? 

It was not the US air force, neither does the later conflict have anything to do with this topic.

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