Jump to content

Best Tool to cut Bamboo trees and Longan branches?


Recommended Posts

Best Tool to cut Bamboo trees and Longan branches? I have maybe a thousand trees to cut...

 

I like the idea of an electric saw but have been told the owner only lasts a short time and batteries are expensive...

 

I don't want a large saw that needs a license.

 

Need a name brand that is easy to find parts for.

 

I am in Chiang mai - any ideas?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a decent battery operated chainsaw.

Google for you tube demos and brand vs brand comparisons.

I've recently joined the power-tool retail space overseas, and I must say some of these new cordless tools are phenomenal. 

Light, quiet, non-polluting, powerful. 

My professional recommendation is DeWalt Makita or Milwaukee. But do your own research. Amazon ship, and you often get generous import refunds from them too. 

Edited by chalawaan
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, TravelerEastWest said:

I don't want a large saw that needs a license.

Since when you need a license here for a chainsaw? This is Thailand, not the West.

 

Other than that, follow the recommendation from post #2, buy a brand name battery operated branch cutting chainsaw, that is attached to a long pole.

You'd probably need one or two additional spare batteries to work a whole day.

IMO no need to order abroad from Amazon. Good brands already available in Thailand in stores or online

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Eurox eu740 electric chainsaw with a honda 1 kva generator so everything nice and quiet,portable,

Only a 11.5 inch bar but cuts well as long as you don't push it and let the chain do the work.

Had a problem with a faulty wiring connection internally on the saw but once i fixed it hasn't missed a beat.

Fil has been using it last two days solid getting his charcoal wood organized.

The chainsaw was 1700 baht from one of the bigger hardware shops.(may sing? with a green sign)

The generator i already had for power outs at home.

In hindsight if i were to buy a set up for your purpose i would go up in size of saw and genset.

I already had the genset so sized saw accordingly.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, chalawaan said:

Get a decent battery operated chainsaw.

Google for you tube demos and brand vs brand comparisons.

I've recently joined the power-tool retail space overseas, and I must say some of these new cordless tools are phenomenal. 

Light, quiet, non-polluting, powerful. 

My professional recommendation is DeWalt Makita or Milwaukee. But do your own research. Amazon ship, and you often get generous import refunds from them too. 

Chalawaan,

 

Thank you for your ideas. I would be very hesitant to buy something with moving parts from Amazon as quick service is important to me...

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Amitofo said:

Easy beezy. Buy a KungFu sword and just jump, slash and cut.  

Basically we are doing that now with a machete - Thai style - works and easy to sharpen but not quick enough and good enough for many bamboo trees...

Link to post
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, farmerjo said:

I use a Eurox eu740 electric chainsaw with a honda 1 kva generator so everything nice and quiet,portable,

Only a 11.5 inch bar but cuts well as long as you don't push it and let the chain do the work.

Had a problem with a faulty wiring connection internally on the saw but once i fixed it hasn't missed a beat.

Fil has been using it last two days solid getting his charcoal wood organized.

The chainsaw was 1700 baht from one of the bigger hardware shops.(may sing? with a green sign)

The generator i already had for power outs at home.

In hindsight if i were to buy a set up for your purpose i would go up in size of saw and genset.

I already had the genset so sized saw accordingly.

 

Thank you!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, TravelerEastWest said:

https://www.homepro.co.th/p/1096835

 

Looking at the above not sure about the size and specs...

 

Or maybe this:

 

https://www.homepro.co.th/p/1115818

The electric one is same wattage as mine as well as blade length.

Mine runs at 5000 rpm.

Looks like it has an oiler button which would be better.

The biggest complaint with electric and battery power is if they have the plastic internal gear which strips the teeth after time.

Some have all metal gears.

What i like about electric is the light weight of machine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a curved pruning saw available in most places for about 300 B and works well.  I am on my third saw, as it is easier to by new when it needs sharpening.  I leave the old ones about for wife's family to borrow and leave my decent saw alone.  Great, non-polluting, and good exercise, and less chance of injury than using chain saw 

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Robin said:

There is a curved pruning saw available in most places for about 300 B and works well.  I am on my third saw, as it is easier to by new when it needs sharpening.  I leave the old ones about for wife's family to borrow and leave my decent saw alone.  Great, non-polluting, and good exercise, and less chance of injury than using chain saw 

Agreed. When I had a mango farm my favourite pruning tool was a long handled curved saw with big teeth and a hook at the tip. Make sure the handle is light, preferably aluminium. You could employ local labourers more cheaply than purchasing and maintaining an electric saw.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Look on Lazada under 'gardening tools' 'hand saw'  available cheaper than I remember.  Hollow metal handle makes it easy to use bamboo pole to extend the reach

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

For bamboo, I have used a pair of lopping shears ,you can get ratchet ones ,I have used the in the UK ,they can go through some big stuff .

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, kickstart said:

For bamboo, I have used a pair of lopping shears ,you can get ratchet ones ,I have used the in the UK ,they can go through some big stuff .

 

 

Interesting - thank you for the idea - but I have hundreds of bamboo to cut and lots of bushes and longan tree trimming.

 

A friend of mine just told me "Electric ones are nice and light but like a toy not taht useful..."

 

I am now looking for a gas one that is around 11 inches so I won't need a license.

Link to post
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, TravelerEastWest said:

Interesting - thank you for the idea - but I have hundreds of bamboo to cut and lots of bushes and longan tree trimming.

 

A friend of mine just told me "Electric ones are nice and light but like a toy not taht useful..."

 

I am now looking for a gas one that is around 11 inches so I won't need a license.

When i went looking for gas chainsaws global house had about six to choose from on the shelf,when i asked for a demo they said not for sale.

The guy looked down and there must of been twenty returned units.

All the shops were the same.

So electric was my only choice locally with the thinking it was cheap enough to get another one if it lasted a decent amount of time,of course i already had the generator.

You might get lucky,dad had a little McCullough that lasted for years,although in the end it still started 1st go cold but once you turned it off it was a pig to get going again.

Will you be using it or someone else. 

The reason i ask is a lot of inexperienced people will rev the trigger getting the blade stuck damaging the bar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, farmerjo said:

When i went looking for gas chainsaws global house had about six to choose from on the shelf,when i asked for a demo they said not for sale.

The guy looked down and there must of been twenty returned units.

All the shops were the same.

So electric was my only choice locally with the thinking it was cheap enough to get another one if it lasted a decent amount of time,of course i already had the generator.

You might get lucky,dad had a little McCullough that lasted for years,although in the end it still started 1st go cold but once you turned it off it was a pig to get going again.

Will you be using it or someone else. 

The reason i ask is a lot of inexperienced people will rev the trigger getting the blade stuck damaging the bar.

I have never seen gas, only electric and petrol.

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Smithson said:

I have never seen gas, only electric and petrol.

I am American we normally use the word gas for gasoline which should be the same as your petrol?

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, farmerjo said:

 

.

"Will you be using it or someone else. 

The reason i ask is a lot of inexperienced people will rev the trigger getting the blade stuck damaging the bar."

I have a farm and someone who is experienced will do the work for me.

 

Although he doesn't take really good care of our tools the way friends and family that i grew up with do...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I received a suggestion from my father in law who has an Italian efco MTH 562 he said it works great now to find where it is for sale in Chiang mai...?

Edited by TravelerEastWest
Link to post
Share on other sites

The new generation battery saws are awesome, especially Husqvarna, I haven't shopped for them in Thailand; I don't know whats available. 

 

Its not a licensed that's needed for larger chainsaws, it a requirement to register with local RFD forestry office. It's a measure to regulate illegal logging. Not so much about the saw as it is about what you are doing with it.  Under 12" do not require registration, but stay away from high profile, high volume tree removals that look like logging. 

 

My advice is not to buy from a big box store, most of them don't offer service.  In Chiang Mai the two places that I've bought chainsaws (and bladed brush cutters, pumps and sprayers, mowers, and other power equipment) are Sriyont in Wat Ket, on the road along the east side of the river,  and Montree the big yellow building at the corner of the SuperHwy and Chotana rd at Kwang Sing interesction. 

 

If you haven't used a chainsaw before, there is a learning process for safety and efficient operation, and for maintenance.  If you don't know how to keep it out of the dirt and rocks, your saw will become instantly useless.  If you don't know how to file the cutters and depth gauges (rakers) yourself then you are S.O.L. (if you're American you know what that means).  I'm available for a free chainsaw training session. 

 

I have a experienced local guy for you to hire if you are interested. He's super efficient and will get a lot done in a day; you can concentrate on the cleanup.  He's a foreman, climber, pruning expert for a large orchard operation in Mae Jo University area. I used to hire him on his days off, for work on our mature mango and lamyai orchards, and as a climber on a tree crew I had going a few years ago. (He still runs the 12" Makita gas chainsaw that I gave him about 12 years ago. 

Edited by drtreelove
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Dr Tree Love,

 

You have a great forum name and with a name like that you probably know about trees! I will send you a message to contact the guy you mentioned.

 

Message sent.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Edited by TravelerEastWest
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/21/2022 at 5:01 PM, farmerjo said:

The electric one is same wattage as mine as well as blade length.

Mine runs at 5000 rpm.

Looks like it has an oiler button which would be better.

The biggest complaint with electric and battery power is if they have the plastic internal gear which strips the teeth after time.

Some have all metal gears.

What i like about electric is the light weight of machine.

The biggest complaint, from a professional, would be the gutless 5000 rpm, when you're used to a screaming 14,000 rpm Husky with no batteries to charge and change

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, drtreelove said:

The biggest complaint, from a professional, would be the gutless 5000 rpm, when you're used to a screaming 14,000 rpm Husky with no batteries to charge and change

They say you get what you pay for.

What i've got is a 1700 baht 740 watt chainsaw that does 3-4 days work a year and expect it to fail after not many hours.

This morning i replaced the short cable of the chainsaw with a 20 metre one with thicker wiring so an extension cord is not need as as the square junction box would snag as the Fil moved around.

So it is now a 2200 baht saw but will get the cable back after he destroys it.

I know the chain will be blunt by now so looking for a couple of replacement ones.

Are chains universal?

Will an 11.5" bar chain fit all makes of chainsaws.

I saw this on lazada but think the price is to cheap.

https://www.lazada.co.th/products/115-electric-chain-saw-parts-for-115-inch-woodworking-tool-wood-cutting-parts-i207875916-s12078371040.html?exlaz=d_1:mm_150050845_51350205_2010350205::12:13920044294!125392363912!!!pla-294682000766!c!294682000766!12078371040!129655195&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8aj87fDM-AIVSE5gCh3O-gchEAQYBCABEgIAn_D_BwE

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, farmerjo said:

Are chains universal?

Will an 11.5" bar chain fit all makes of chainsaws.

 

Chains are universal,just make shore that the chain is the same size  ,bars are universal .

I just wish chain quality was universal I got a Stihl chain for my saw from our local shop ,as Dr T said keeping them sharp is the art ,I think I have now got back the art I had 35 years ago,last time I owned a chain saw 

But the chain is a Chinese  Stihl, cuts no more than half  dozen biggish logs then it is blunt as the Camel's dangle  bits ,I got a sharpening kit with a sharpening guide (Chinese ) from Lazada 350 baht does the job OK .

 

The  photo? a 7inch angale grinder with a 36 inch chainsaw bar ,homemade ,seen one being used cutting planks from a large tree, like the chain oiler 

RIMG0922.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/21/2022 at 5:07 PM, Robin said:

There is a curved pruning saw available in most places for about 300 B and works well.  I am on my third saw, as it is easier to by new when it needs sharpening.  I leave the old ones about for wife's family to borrow and leave my decent saw alone.  Great, non-polluting, and good exercise, and less chance of injury than using chain saw 

This is a very good recommendation. 

Yes, chance of injury is not to be taken lightly. 

 

For the best performance and durability in a curved pruning handsaw, choose one with a Japanese tri-cut tooth design and best quality steel that you can find. 

Topman brand at HomePro is pretty good. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...