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RTN Delivers 154 Tons of Water to Drought-Hit Koh Larn


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The Royal Thai Navy (RTN) vessel HTMS Ravi delivered approximately 154 tonnes (approximately 154,000 litres) of fresh water to residents of Koh Larn in Pattaya, addressing an ongoing drought.

 

This significant delivery occurred yesterday, prompted by Koh Larn’s struggle with water shortages exacerbated by dry weather and a surge in tourist numbers.

 

In response to complaints from residents and tourists regarding insufficient water supplies, Pattaya Mayor Poramase Ngampiches sought assistance from the Royal Thai Navy’s Fleet Command 1.

 

“The Pattaya administration acknowledges the challenges faced by Koh Larn residents. Therefore, we approached Fleet Command 1 to facilitate the delivery of water and alleviate this situation.”

 

The delivered water aims to fulfill the immediate needs of Koh Larn residents temporarily. Simultaneously, Pattaya officials are actively pursuing long-term solutions to the island’s water scarcity issues.

 

Meanwhile, in related news, Thailand and China finally wrapped up negotiations on the RTN’s much-anticipated purchase of a Chinese-made S26T Yuan-class submarine.

 

RTN Commander-in-Chief Admiral Adoong Pan-iam announced today that the agreement is now awaiting the final nod from the Thai Cabinet.

 

“If approved, we will promptly amend the deal with the Chinese manufacturer.”

 

Admiral Adoong expects the submarine to be delivered in three years. This advanced vessel will significantly enhance the navy’s capabilities, as it will be the first of its kind in Southeast Asia, featuring cutting-edge weaponry.

 

The submarine deal has faced numerous delays due to the RTN’s initial insistence on German-made diesel engines, a requirement detailed in the original procurement contract. However, Germany has refused to supply these engines to China, adhering to the European Union’s boycott of the country.

 

Faced with this roadblock, the RTN has decided to abandon its demand for German engines and will instead use the Chinese-made CHD620 diesel engine.

 

Admiral Adoong is confident that this acquisition will make the Thai public proud.

“This is a significant milestone for the RTN. We are acquiring our first submarine, and it may be just the beginning, we could see one or two more in the future.”

 

Picture courtesy: Siam Rath

 

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-- 2024-06-17

 

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21 minutes ago, JoePai said:

Meanwhile, in related news

 

Anyone explain the twisted logic behind a sub purchase and delivering (fresh I hope!) water to an island ?

Commanders need their toys to continue looking needed.

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

Simultaneously, Pattaya officials are actively pursuing long-term solutions to the island’s water scarcity issues.

Maybe seawater desalination plants?

In 2021 one was being planned for the EEC but that likely had Thai military and PM Prayut behind it, Prayut being on the EEC Board. Current politics might not help PM Thavisin get similar support.

 

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They are constantly shutting off the water a couple days a week on Pratumnak hill. I’m sure it happens all over the city but considering they keep saying we are good on the water supply, I just have to wonder how they are managing this. 🤔 

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9 minutes ago, Taboo2 said:

Desalination works.  It is not that expensive to build using today's technology.  Humans need to wake up.

Can you put a price on the "not that expensive to build" claim for a desalination plant to generate perhaps 1,000 tons of water per day. Plus of course the daily running costs.

 

Out of curiosity, how much fresh water does Koh Larn use per day?

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

Faced with this roadblock, the RTN has decided to abandon its demand for German engines and will instead use the Chinese-made CHD620 diesel engine.


Good luck with that. German reliability over Chinese junk? 🤷‍♀️

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24 minutes ago, billd766 said:

Can you put a price on the "not that expensive to build" claim for a desalination plant to generate perhaps 1,000 tons of water per day. Plus of course the daily running costs.

 

Out of curiosity, how much fresh water does Koh Larn use per day?

1,000 tons = 1,000 x 1,000 litres per day. That must be enough for the island.

Running costs? No idea. But Thailand will have to build a lot of them soon, I think, with the increasing droughts and then pump the water inland to wherever it's needed.  Maybe desalination stations are more important than commission-oriented F-16s and Shark-hunting submarines.

Edited by renaissanc
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40848 gallons how long can that last? I just know how many people live on the island and how much water that we consume a day a gallon and how much yours come there in a day so I don’t think that would last too long TIT

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They'll never have enough water unless they build resavoir/storage facility on the mainland with a an underwater dual pipe system feeding storage tanks on the island.

 

It'll pay for itself with the added tourism.

 

More importantly they need to haul off the garbage piling up at the open air garbage dump.

It's going to eventually poison the underground water supply.

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2 hours ago, renaissanc said:

1,000 tons = 1,000 x 1,000 litres per day. That must be enough for the island.

Running costs? No idea. But Thailand will have to build a lot of them soon, I think, with the increasing droughts and then pump the water inland to wherever it's needed.  Maybe desalination stations are more important than commission-oriented F-16s and Shark-hunting submarines.

 

2 hours ago, renaissanc said:

1,000 tons = 1,000 x 1,000 litres per day. That must be enough for the island.

Running costs? No idea. But Thailand will have to build a lot of them soon, I think, with the increasing droughts and then pump the water inland to wherever it's needed.  Maybe desalination stations are more important than commission-oriented F-16s and Shark-hunting submarines.

I merely picked the 1,000 tons per day as a figure. The actual amount will depend on the resident population, the number of tourists and the amount of water each use per day.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko_Lan#:~:text=In addition%2C there are up,and workers on the island.

 

During low season, Ko Lan attracts about 3,000 visitors a day. In high season, as many as 10,000 people daily visit. They generate about two million baht in daily income.[citation needed] Its maximum daily visitor capacity is 6,410.[1] In addition, there are up to 8,000 permanent residents and workers on the island.

 

As a rough average you can use the figure of 14,000 people per day. If each person uses 1,000 litres per day or 1 ton, then you need a minimum of 140  tons per day, every day, far less than my original estimate but enough to supply Koh Larn and the adjacent islands.

 

I have no idea of running costs, as I have never had any dealings with desalination plants.

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Hard to believe it only took them 14 days to get water there. The news about the drought affecting that island came out May 3. 

https://www.pattayamail.com/news/water-crisis-hits-koh-larn-island-amid-tourist-surge-and-drought-459604#:~:text=Attributing the water scarcity to,for residents and businesses alike.

 

I think the RTN waited for the non-existent rainy season to begin sending water there. I wonder how many suffered from their time waiting? 

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16 hours ago, Taboo2 said:

Desalination works.  It is not that expensive to build using today's technology.  Humans need to wake up.

I thought it required a lot of energy and was usually linked to power generation because of that. 

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3 minutes ago, phil2803 said:

Or take a note from Singapore, recycle which is cheaper and desalinate.

Desal consumes huge amounts of energy  and Thailand is reliant on coal for energy production in its power plants. I was involved in the Dubai desal plant operated by Dubal in Jebel Alley in the 1980's, that was only successful because the energy used was a bi product off shoot of aluminium production.

 

https://www.pub.gov.sg/Public/WaterLoop/OurWaterStory/DesalinatedWater

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They have no choice in the long term other than to to desalinate if they are  hellbent on quantity rather than quality. They cannot even manage to get rid of their garbage, so why more people anyway  ?

 

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21 hours ago, Mike Lister said:

Desal consumes huge amounts of energy  and Thailand is reliant on coal for energy production in its power plants. I was involved in the Dubai desal plant operated by Dubal in Jebel Alley in the 1980's, that was only successful because the energy used was a bi product off shoot of aluminium production.

 

https://www.pub.gov.sg/Public/WaterLoop/OurWaterStory/DesalinatedWater

FWIW, in 2023, Thailand relied on fossil fuels for 84% of its electricity, primarily gas (68%). Its per capita power sector emissions are below the global average. About one-sixth of Thailand’s electricity generation comes from renewables, mostly bioenergy and hydropower. coal is a small factor (18%) in power generation in LOS. The UAE has turned the desert green through desal plants. I have personally commissioned 6 large units there. Desal plants are indeed tied to electrical power generation, but due to the availability of steam, not electricity. Desal is very good technology for seaside locations and relatively cost effective for the water gained. [ fuels used to generate electrical power in Thailand - Search (bing.com) ]

Edited by paulbrow
correction
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