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Are these numbers for real????????


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I have a pickup truck, the type everyone in Thailand has.

Usually I put 34psi in my tires, but I recently replaced all ball joints - cabin mounts etc, so it was jumping a bit too much to my likening, and I lowered the pressure to 32psi.
So I was curious what the recommended pressure is, started googling, and was flabbergasted by the results.

https://www.souzastireservice.com/Tires-101/Air-Pressure

3/4 ton and 1 ton trucks and vans:

Unlike cars, minivans, and lighter trucks that often specify low air pressure, the heavier trucks usually specify very high air pressure. A common air pressure for one these would be 55 front, 80 rear, or 75 front and rear, or like the example above, 50 front and 65 rear.

 

https://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/air-pressure-on-1-ton-diesel-207400.html

 

Bought a used 1 ton diesel (see signature). The sticker says to run the rears at 80psi and the fronts at 60psi. Does that sound right for trailering to ya'll?

I have a 1 ton dually long box 4x4. I haul a 35 ft 5er. When the 5er is on the truck I am at 80 psi all around including the trailer. When not hauling the tires on the truck go down to 50/55 psi. The ride on the truck is a bit better at the lower psi. My truck spare is at 80 all the time.

 

https://www.pirate4x4.com/threads/tire-pressure-for-a-1-ton.73050/

 

For a D/E rated tire, 80 psi isn't out of the ordinary. For a rig that is used just for towing, I'd run max psi -5 lbs.

 

I can only imagine how my pickup would be dancing over the road with those pressures.

 

Anyone here owning a pickup or SUV who put those kinds of pressures in their tires?

Edited by CallumWK
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15 minutes ago, CallumWK said:

The sticker says to run the rears at 80psi and the fronts at 60psi.

That must be for the one ton trucks , fitted with the 10 ton springs ,have you seen them

massive springs with some times 4 shocks ,  mostly loaded with farm produce

 

regards worgeordie

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2 minutes ago, worgeordie said:

That must be for the one ton trucks , fitted with the 10 ton springs ,have you seen them

massive springs with some times 4 shocks ,  mostly loaded with farm produce

 

regards worgeordie

 

Have you seen that all those links are foreign websites? I doubt that in the US, or anywhere else in the world, 1 ton pickups drive around with 10 ton springs

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3 minutes ago, KhunBENQ said:

Screenshot_20240622_090730_Chrome.jpg

 

Those numbers are far from the 60 and 80psi pressures reported in the links. In fact, I couldn't find anything on Google that mentioned 40 or lower.

 

I believe you are owner of a pickup, so what pressure you put in your tires for a comfortable ride?

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Owner's manual will give recommended PSI.

 

Max PSI should be imprinted on sidewall of the tire.  You can judge by that, depending on your usual load.   Since a pick up, and if not used much as, (heavy load), may want to go a bit less in the rear.

 

Example, on our MG ZS EV tires, 'max psi' of 51.   I like to keep it at ~40.  On highway at speed, it will reach ~44

 

Manual states:

image.png.70864d7120858bf918f7a741862fa907.png

2020 MG ZS ICEV recommended @ 34pse, since quite a bit lighter.

Edited by KhunLA
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I just checked mine, and it says 35psi front, half and maximum load, and rear 35 HL and 41 ML.

 

When I put 34psi front and rear, with the new cabin mounts and ball joints, it dances too much to my likening. The 34psi was fine before the renovation of my 14 year old truck, so maybe I'm a bit too sensitive and need to get used to it?

 

Still leaves the question, where those 65 - 80psi numbers on those foreign websites come from, and how that could be considered drivable?

 

 

 

 

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51 minutes ago, CallumWK said:

I just checked mine, and it says 35psi front, half and maximum load, and rear 35 HL and 41 ML.

 

When I put 34psi front and rear, with the new cabin mounts and ball joints, it dances too much to my likening. The 34psi was fine before the renovation of my 14 year old truck, so maybe I'm a bit too sensitive and need to get used to it?

 

Still leaves the question, where those 65 - 80psi numbers on those foreign websites come from, and how that could be considered drivable?

 

 

 

 

I think you have the answer to your issue right here. Go by feel. If it feels right and the pressures are not radically different from the norm, then that's probably the pressure you need. Don't over think it, just go by feel.

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13 hours ago, CallumWK said:

I have a pickup truck, the type everyone in Thailand has.

Usually I put 34psi in my tires, but I recently replaced all ball joints - cabin mounts etc, so it was jumping a bit too much to my likening, and I lowered the pressure to 32psi.
So I was curious what the recommended pressure is, started googling, and was flabbergasted by the results.

https://www.souzastireservice.com/Tires-101/Air-Pressure

3/4 ton and 1 ton trucks and vans:

Unlike cars, minivans, and lighter trucks that often specify low air pressure, the heavier trucks usually specify very high air pressure. A common air pressure for one these would be 55 front, 80 rear, or 75 front and rear, or like the example above, 50 front and 65 rear.

 

https://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/air-pressure-on-1-ton-diesel-207400.html

 

Bought a used 1 ton diesel (see signature). The sticker says to run the rears at 80psi and the fronts at 60psi. Does that sound right for trailering to ya'll?

I have a 1 ton dually long box 4x4. I haul a 35 ft 5er. When the 5er is on the truck I am at 80 psi all around including the trailer. When not hauling the tires on the truck go down to 50/55 psi. The ride on the truck is a bit better at the lower psi. My truck spare is at 80 all the time.

 

https://www.pirate4x4.com/threads/tire-pressure-for-a-1-ton.73050/

 

For a D/E rated tire, 80 psi isn't out of the ordinary. For a rig that is used just for towing, I'd run max psi -5 lbs.

 

I can only imagine how my pickup would be dancing over the road with those pressures.

 

Anyone here owning a pickup or SUV who put those kinds of pressures in their tires?

Usually there's a sticker on the driver's door frame with recommended pressure for that model. Check that your tires are the same size as on the sticker and follow the instructions. In my pickup is has 3 settings as in normal load\heavy load\best fuel consumption (or something like that). I usually go by the medium pressure of 38 all around and adjusting it when carrying a heavy load.

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3 hours ago, CallumWK said:

I just checked mine, and it says 35psi front, half and maximum load, and rear 35 HL and 41 ML.

 

When I put 34psi front and rear, with the new cabin mounts and ball joints, it dances too much to my likening. The 34psi was fine before the renovation of my 14 year old truck, so maybe I'm a bit too sensitive and need to get used to it?

 

Still leaves the question, where those 65 - 80psi numbers on those foreign websites come from, and how that could be considered drivable?

 

 

 

 

have you had tracking checked, since the new ball joints

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1 minute ago, steve187 said:

have you had tracking checked, since the new ball joints

 

Of course after replacing ball joints and steering rack, the tracking was adjusted again.

 

The issue isn't that the car goes off track, but every unevenness in the road can be felt.

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8 minutes ago, NoDisplayName said:

Toyota Hilux Vigo driver's door label:

 

20570R15

empty:  F  35 psi  R  48 psi

laden:   F  35 psi  R  65 psi

 

 

 

 

That is a huge difference from the spec @KhunBENQ posted for the same car.

 

image.jpeg.2e60b87d7b8b30dd27e406ca43d40455.jpeg

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Tire pressures vary for single-cab, extended-cab, double-cab, 4WD versions of same vehicle and year.

 

Owners manuals can be downloaded.

 

See page 271:

 

https://gimmemanuals.com/owners/2021/06/2009-toyota-hilux-owners-manual.pdf

 

I've got a single-cab, 2WD, long bed model.  Not hauling heavy loads, so normally inflate to 35/48.

 

 

 

 

Edited by NoDisplayName
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4 hours ago, CallumWK said:

I just checked mine, and it says 35psi front, half and maximum load, and rear 35 HL and 41 ML.

 

When I put 34psi front and rear, with the new cabin mounts and ball joints, it dances too much to my likening. The 34psi was fine before the renovation of my 14 year old truck, so maybe I'm a bit too sensitive and need to get used to it?

 

Still leaves the question, where those 65 - 80psi numbers on those foreign websites come from, and how that could be considered drivable?

 

 

 

Did you replace the shocks?

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1 hour ago, CallumWK said:

 

Of course after replacing ball joints and steering rack, the tracking was adjusted again.

 

The issue isn't that the car goes off track, but every unevenness in the road can be felt.

shocks?

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, NoDisplayName said:

 

Did you replace the shocks?

 

Didn't replace shocks as I had them replaced with genuine ones about 50K km before.

 

I expect if shocks were bad that it would just be the opposite of what I experience. On an unevenness, the car is soft but it tends to jump a little

Edited by CallumWK
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On my good old 2011 Misubishi Pajero Sport I got tyre pressure as suggested:

Front 2,0 bar  / Rear 2,2 bar 

           29 psi  /           32 psi 

If no Backrow Passengers and long Distance Highway trips, I reduce in the Rear Tyres to 2,0 bar/ 29 psi 

Comfortable in all Weather Conditions.

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On 6/21/2024 at 10:54 PM, CallumWK said:

I have a pickup truck, the type everyone in Thailand has.

Usually I put 34psi in my tires, but I recently replaced all ball joints - cabin mounts etc, so it was jumping a bit too much to my likening, and I lowered the pressure to 32psi.
So I was curious what the recommended pressure is, started googling, and was flabbergasted by the results.

https://www.souzastireservice.com/Tires-101/Air-Pressure

3/4 ton and 1 ton trucks and vans:

Unlike cars, minivans, and lighter trucks that often specify low air pressure, the heavier trucks usually specify very high air pressure. A common air pressure for one these would be 55 front, 80 rear, or 75 front and rear, or like the example above, 50 front and 65 rear.

 

https://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f12/air-pressure-on-1-ton-diesel-207400.html

 

Bought a used 1 ton diesel (see signature). The sticker says to run the rears at 80psi and the fronts at 60psi. Does that sound right for trailering to ya'll?

I have a 1 ton dually long box 4x4. I haul a 35 ft 5er. When the 5er is on the truck I am at 80 psi all around including the trailer. When not hauling the tires on the truck go down to 50/55 psi. The ride on the truck is a bit better at the lower psi. My truck spare is at 80 all the time.

 

https://www.pirate4x4.com/threads/tire-pressure-for-a-1-ton.73050/

 

For a D/E rated tire, 80 psi isn't out of the ordinary. For a rig that is used just for towing, I'd run max psi -5 lbs.

 

I can only imagine how my pickup would be dancing over the road with those pressures.

 

Anyone here owning a pickup or SUV who put those kinds of pressures in their tires?

Remember it is the Air that carries the load and not the tire, so if your one-ton pickup is fully loaded you need more air than when it is empty.

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The air pressure keeps the treads in contact with the road and the sidewalls at the intended roundness. Increase the load and the sidewalls bulge out, locally heating up that can lead to premature failure. Increasing the tire pressure corrects that. Remove the load and the tire tends to round out reducing the amount of tread in contact with the road - dangerous for control. Reducing tire pressure puts the treads back on the road.

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I have ford F 250 in Canada ,heavy 7.3 litre diesel.Run it with an equally heavy slide in camper and have added leaf springs 75 to 85psi.Mitsubishi ,4 door  triton in Thailand 32 to 35 psi.Trucks are completely different animals wight wise

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2 hours ago, bwanajohn said:

I have ford F 250 in Canada ,heavy 7.3 litre diesel.Run it with an equally heavy slide in camper and have added leaf springs 75 to 85psi.Mitsubishi ,4 door  triton in Thailand 32 to 35 psi.Trucks are completely different animals wight wise

Yes I agree that what we call a pickup truck in Thailand, is completely different from what is used in the N America or Australia. 

 

Wow, 7.3 litre diesel, need 3 pickup engines in Thailand for that

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