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Surapong Should Represent Thailand, Not Ex-PM Thaksin


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EDITORIAL

Surapong should represent the country, not ex-PM

By The Nation

New foreign minister should come clean about his intention on Thaksin

Surapong Towichakchaikul tried hard to display his humbleness in his first interview after being appointed foreign minister. He admitted not knowing much about diplomacy and international relations and thanked his critics for their statements, saying he saw them as part of his learning process.

From a bird's eye view, that wasn't a bad position to take. Being humble and showing humility are not bad traits to adopt when one is confronted and cornered.

But it did not take him long to make a mistake. Unfortunately, in his line of business, people only remember the last thing you say, not so much what was said previously. Surapong made the mistake of insulting the public and his critics' intelligence, which is a another no-no in diplomacy.

Surapong admitted to talking with the Japanese Ambassador to Thailand, Seiji Kochima, about ways to help fugitive former premier Thaksin Shinwatra get an entry visa to Japan. That was fine as it is, but then came the punch-line: Japan wanted to know if Thailand would have any objection if Thaksin was granted a visa to enter their country.

We may never know the exact words from the Japanese ambassador and it's probably not an issue at this point in time. But if Surapong wants to help his cousin Thaksin get a visa to a country - or assist him with his political future, or whatever - he should just come clean. People, including people who hate Thaksin, will respect him for it.

We understand that pretentions are an important part of diplomacy. But Surapong need not be going for an Oscar in his first week in his new job. There is a difference between holding back information and lying.

Surapong came to the ministry at a time when the public wants to see a career diplomat get the post. The logic was that he or she could use their skills to restore Thailand's good relations with the international community, especially neighbouring countries.

Surapong's expertise is in information technology, telecommunications and finance, and not in foreign affairs.

But while no minister in any government should be thrust into a post he knows little about, we should not assume that ignorance may be a bliss in this respect. He could make a good fist of a posting if his policies and strategies are sound.

Most importantly, Surapong needs to understand he is representing the country, not a convicted fugitive. And so when the first big piece of news from the ministry happens to be about the de facto leader of Pheu Thai, his Party, which is headed by Thaksin's sister Yingluck, one can understand why this is a big turnoff.

It is said that Surapong got the position because of his close association with Thaksin, because the former premier wants a foreign minister who can help him while he lives in exile.

To be fair to Surapong, one can make the same argument that the same ground rule applies to other ministers as well.

It's understandable that they want to help their de facto leader. But few believe that their efforts to help Thaksin won't come at some cost for Thailand.

This will be a tightrope to walk. They need to be reminded that they didn't campaign on helping this convicted criminal. They campaigned on making Thailand a better country, a reconciled nation that has been bitterly divided, partly because of their de facto leader.

It won't be easy. But he can start with putting a halt to insulting people's intelligence about his intention and spell out what his government has in mind for Thailand and its international standing.

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-- The Nation 2011-08-15

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Surapong Towichakchaikul tried hard to display his humbleness in his first interview after being appointed foreign minister. He admitted not knowing much about diplomacy and international relations and thanked his critics for their statements, saying he saw them as part of his learning process.

UM. He has been appointed the foreign minister and he admits that he know much about diplomacy and international relations? <deleted>?

I think that I will become a nuclear technician, like Homer Simpson. Don't know anything about it but it can't be that hard.

Edited by metisdead
Font resized, use default forum font when posting.
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Thaksin applied for a VISA to Japan.

The Japanese Ambassador asked the new foreign minister if that would be a problem.

This is a story or the continued attack on the Shin family?

Beware when reading the local papers. They twist and distort. Often for payment.

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How true the expression, "A picture is worth a thousand words."

Brother number 1 has them all dancing to his tune, Money, Money, Money, It's the Rich Man's Tool.

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The Nation writes a lot of nonsense from time to time, in another article today they write :

"Thaksin, who was invited by the Japan, China, Asean Institute of Economy and Culture, plans to hold a news conference and give a lecture during his visit. He also plans to visit areas affected by the earthquake and tsunami."

So it is not really Thailand that mr Thaksin is representing is it ???? He was invited ..... Your headline is misleading ...

Sad to see that this editorial is so biased but hardly surprising ... would never spend a THB buying it .

Report news instead don't create it.

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The Nation writes a lot of nonsense from time to time, in another article today they write :

"Thaksin, who was invited by the Japan, China, Asean Institute of Economy and Culture, plans to hold a news conference and give a lecture during his visit. He also plans to visit areas affected by the earthquake and tsunami."

So it is not really Thailand that mr Thaksin is representing is it ???? He was invited ..... Your headline is misleading ...

Sad to see that this editorial is so biased but hardly surprising ... would never spend a THB buying it .

Report news instead don't create it.

Dont think I would trust the date on this newspaper. Pity many on here base a lot of their opinions on this and similar tabloids.

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"Surapong came to the ministry at a time when the public wants to see a career diplomat get the post." Wow, they sure went wrong on this one. As far as I can tell, about the only thing he's spent his career doing is kissing Thaksins a**.

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Before Thaksin is heading to Japan and visit the disaster zones, an official representative of Thailand should do this. Thaksin uses this as a backdoor to show that he still works for Thailand, he is still an inofficial "official". It's a poor performance of the Thai side, or is it planed like this?

fatfather

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If "every"country knows that, why do so many refuse him entry?

At risk of arrest (really?), I will discuss why. He was the head of a dept which sold govt assets (land, in this case) to his wife (legally in Thailand, to himself) where such dealings are specifically banned as a conflict of interest. Strangely enough, it would also be a criminal offense in those countries that have banned him, so I guess they understand the ruling of the court fairly well. They also understand that there are many other corruption charges waiting his return, and eventually there may be a lot more if those charges are not pressed by the current govt.

Before you start calling the charges "politically motivated," please let us know in which country the courts take into account the motivation of the prosecutors. It is not considered by the court as it is irrelevant as to whether an offence has been committed and the assignation of guilt.

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A post criticizing the legal proceedings in Thailand has been removed.

It's even illegal in Thailand to discuss why.

15) Not to use ThaiVisa.com to post any material which is knowingly or can be reasonably construed as false, inaccurate, invasive of a person's privacy, or otherwise in violation of any law. You also agree not to post negative comments criticizing the legal proceedings or judgments of any Thai court of law.

Another reminder that posts using derogatory nicknames or intentional misspelling of people’s names will be deleted. If you don’t want your post to be deleted, spell people’s names correctly.

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If "every"country knows that, why do so many refuse him entry?

At risk of arrest (really?), I will discuss why. He was the head of a dept which sold govt assets (land, in this case) to his wife (legally in Thailand, to himself) where such dealings are specifically banned as a conflict of interest. Strangely enough, it would also be a criminal offense in those countries that have banned him, so I guess they understand the ruling of the court fairly well. They also understand that there are many other corruption charges waiting his return, and eventually there may be a lot more if those charges are not pressed by the current govt.

Before you start calling the charges "politically motivated," please let us know in which country the courts take into account the motivation of the prosecutors. It is not considered by the court as it is irrelevant as to whether an offence has been committed and the assignation of guilt.

Where are the many countries that refuse him entry?

Interpol for example calls the charges "politically motivated".

I think in Japan and Germany, for example, they look at it the same.

And since the noisy hothead Kasit is gone, the foreign diplomats have no problem if Thaksin travels to Japan or Germany, like he travels to many other countries.

Its a return to situation 'normal'.

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Foreign minister not downcast at negative poll

BANGKOK, 15 August 2011 (NNT) – Foreign Minister Surapong Tovichakchaikul is not disheartened by the recent poll result that people are disappointed the most with his appointment as foreign minister.

Upon criticisms that he has little diplomatic experiences, the minister responded that he has been asking for some advice from former Foreign Minister Noppadon Pattama. He said he will seek more advice from ex-Foreign Minister Surakiart Sathirathai on international trade promotion.

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-- NNT 2011-08-15 footer_n.gif

Edited by Buchholz
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like he travels to many other countries.

like Zimbabwe and Uganda and Fiji and other highly desirable locales.

Sounds cool, better than to end up in Sri Ratcha as a foreigner, right?

Or France, Sweden, Russia ... and now Germany and Japan.

The list of countries that have no issues with Thaksin and allow him to travel is long.

That there are "many countries refuse him entry" is a delusion.

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Going back to the OP, what has k. Surapong done for Thailand in it's relation to foreign countries? Are there no urgent matters? Preah Vihear and the Cambodians for instance? ASEAN issues, co-ordinating with the Ministry of Economy for favourable ties with countries importing lots of Thai stuff? It seems k. Surapong has been in the news only in relation to k. Thaksin, nice first week in the office :ermm:

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If "every"country knows that, why do so many refuse him entry?

At risk of arrest (really?), I will discuss why. He was the head of a dept which sold govt assets (land, in this case) to his wife (legally in Thailand, to himself) where such dealings are specifically banned as a conflict of interest. Strangely enough, it would also be a criminal offense in those countries that have banned him, so I guess they understand the ruling of the court fairly well. They also understand that there are many other corruption charges waiting his return, and eventually there may be a lot more if those charges are not pressed by the current govt.

Before you start calling the charges "politically motivated," please let us know in which country the courts take into account the motivation of the prosecutors. It is not considered by the court as it is irrelevant as to whether an offence has been committed and the assignation of guilt.

Where are the many countries that refuse him entry?

Interpol for example calls the charges "politically motivated".

I think in Japan and Germany, for example, they look at it the same.

And since the noisy hothead Kasit is gone, the foreign diplomats have no problem if Thaksin travels to Japan or Germany, like he travels to many other countries.

Its a return to situation 'normal'.

Please re-read the latter part of my post. Interpol is smart enough to realise it is a waste of resources to pursue a criminal, then hand him over to his sister for prosecution.

He was found guilty under a PPP admin. I assume political pressure was brought to bear, the effect reduced by a clumsy bribery attempt.

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Please re-read the latter part of my post. Interpol is smart enough to realise it is a waste of resources to pursue a criminal, then hand him over to his sister for prosecution.

I dont believe interpol was requested to persue him in the first place....:whistling:

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Going back to the OP, what has k. Surapong done for Thailand in it's relation to foreign countries? Are there no urgent matters? Preah Vihear and the Cambodians for instance? ASEAN issues, co-ordinating with the Ministry of Economy for favourable ties with countries importing lots of Thai stuff? It seems k. Surapong has been in the news only in relation to k. Thaksin, nice first week in the office :ermm:

Ah yes, but he hasn't actually got to his office yet, not expected until Wednesday. This was extra-curricular commitment, before he even speaks to foreign ministry staff, and IMHO is prima facie evidence of conflict of interest if not corruption - that would require evidence of collateral changing hands, but I'm sure that will show up eventually.

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If "every"country knows that, why do so many refuse him entry?

At risk of arrest (really?), I will discuss why. He was the head of a dept which sold govt assets (land, in this case) to his wife (legally in Thailand, to himself) where such dealings are specifically banned as a conflict of interest. Strangely enough, it would also be a criminal offense in those countries that have banned him, so I guess they understand the ruling of the court fairly well. They also understand that there are many other corruption charges waiting his return, and eventually there may be a lot more if those charges are not pressed by the current govt.

Before you start calling the charges "politically motivated," please let us know in which country the courts take into account the motivation of the prosecutors. It is not considered by the court as it is irrelevant as to whether an offence has been committed and the assignation of guilt.

Where are the many countries that refuse him entry?

Interpol for example calls the charges "politically motivated".

I think in Japan and Germany, for example, they look at it the same.

And since the noisy hothead Kasit is gone, the foreign diplomats have no problem if Thaksin travels to Japan or Germany, like he travels to many other countries.

Its a return to situation 'normal'.

Please re-read the latter part of my post. Interpol is smart enough to realise it is a waste of resources to pursue a criminal, then hand him over to his sister for prosecution.

He was found guilty under a PPP admin. I assume political pressure was brought to bear, the effect reduced by a clumsy bribery attempt.

Yes, you got it wrong. I read it. Its an old story that Interpol said the charges are "politically motivated". Has nothing to do with the new PM.

And Thaksin traveled to many countries. Which one are the many the refuse him entry and for what reasons?

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If "every"country knows that, why do so many refuse him entry?

At risk of arrest (really?), I will discuss why. He was the head of a dept which sold govt assets (land, in this case) to his wife (legally in Thailand, to himself) where such dealings are specifically banned as a conflict of interest. Strangely enough, it would also be a criminal offense in those countries that have banned him, so I guess they understand the ruling of the court fairly well. They also understand that there are many other corruption charges waiting his return, and eventually there may be a lot more if those charges are not pressed by the current govt.

Before you start calling the charges "politically motivated," please let us know in which country the courts take into account the motivation of the prosecutors. It is not considered by the court as it is irrelevant as to whether an offence has been committed and the assignation of guilt.

Where are the many countries that refuse him entry?

Interpol for example calls the charges "politically motivated".

I think in Japan and Germany, for example, they look at it the same.

And since the noisy hothead Kasit is gone, the foreign diplomats have no problem if Thaksin travels to Japan or Germany, like he travels to many other countries.

Its a return to situation 'normal'.

Please re-read the latter part of my post. Interpol is smart enough to realise it is a waste of resources to pursue a criminal, then hand him over to his sister for prosecution.

He was found guilty under a PPP admin. I assume political pressure was brought to bear, the effect reduced by a clumsy bribery attempt.

Yes, you got it wrong. I read it. Its an old story that Interpol said the charges are "politically motivated". Has nothing to do with the new PM.

And Thaksin traveled to many countries. Which one are the many the refuse him entry and for what reasons?

"I read it". Care to share?

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