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The Hit And Run Restaurant "review" Thread


Jingthing
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Restaurant Split in Soi Chayapruek.

Went for lunch today with 2 friends. 2 of us had the Balkan Mixed Grill while the 3rd (who hates garlic) had a pizza.

Both the pizza and the mixed grill were tasty and plenty off.

Beer 60 Baht and the mixed grill for 2 was 480 Baht. Don't remember price of the pizza.

Friendly owner and service and VERY clean.

Liked it and will occasionally return.

Yermanee wai.gif

p.s. Closed on Mondays !

Edited by yermanee
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"The Place" Israeli Restaurant

Menu in English and Hebrew and maybe Thai (I forget)

Hard to find Israeli specialties: Shakshuka served with bread (this is very similar to Mexican Huevos Rancheros I kid you not!), Hummus with spicy meat, Hummus with organ meats, Baba ghanoush, Full platter dinner meals, Homemade soups such as chicken or lentil

I think probably the best Israeli "place" in town and yes of course an Israeli tourist hangout

Soi Boukaow, not too far from Pattaya Tai

https://foursquare.c...a52fadb3461eb25

Thanks for your post! Stopped into The Place today and ordered Hummus with Meat & Baba Ganoush; both were very good. We especially liked the hummus plate, never having ordered it this way before. The hummus was deep & rich tasting, with a balanced blend of garlic, tahini, lemon juice, etc. In the center, was a mound of seasoned, slightly saucy ground beef (somewhat similar to taco flavor): 220 baht, including (2) small, warmed pita breads. Good place. Photo's not from The Place, but similar.

cool.png

Sounds like a winner...cant wait to try.

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Thanks for your post! Stopped into The Place today and ordered Hummus with Meat & Baba Ganoush; both were very good.

Forget to mention before on Saturday morning they serve the traditional SLOW COOKED Jewish sabbath stew, Hamin (Hebrew) / Cholent. 200 baht I recall.

I guess come early or they run out. Also I don't think they serve felafel. The hummus can be ordered I think, plain, with the spicy minced meat (which I had as well), or with organ meat like livers and hearts which apparently is a massively popular Israeli street food.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholent

Edited by Jingthing
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Thanks for your post! Stopped into The Place today and ordered Hummus with Meat & Baba Ganoush; both were very good.

Forget to mention before on Saturday morning they serve the traditional SLOW COOKED Jewish sabbath stew, Hamin (Hebrew) / Cholent. 200 baht I recall.

I guess come early or they run out. Also I don't think they serve felafel. The hummus can be ordered I think, plain, with the spicy minced meat (which I had as well), or with organ meat like livers and hearts which apparently is a massively popular Israeli street food.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholent

Since you mentioned it, are the owners of this place religiously observant Jews? I ask because I want to know are they open 7 days or do they close for the sabbath? (I think Friday sundown till Saturday same.)

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Thanks for your post! Stopped into The Place today and ordered Hummus with Meat & Baba Ganoush; both were very good.

Forget to mention before on Saturday morning they serve the traditional SLOW COOKED Jewish sabbath stew, Hamin (Hebrew) / Cholent. 200 baht I recall.

I guess come early or they run out. Also I don't think they serve felafel. The hummus can be ordered I think, plain, with the spicy minced meat (which I had as well), or with organ meat like livers and hearts which apparently is a massively popular Israeli street food.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholent

Since you mentioned it, are the owners of this place religiously observant Jews? I ask because I want to know are they open 7 days or do they close for the sabbath? (I think Friday sundown till Saturday same.)

I don't know.

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Italian - Don Joe. Best steak I've had in Pattaya and only 500 baht, good seafood also very good pizza & Italian deserts (subjective of course!). In Walking Street, the second Italian Restaurant on the right hand side after entering from Beach Road, approx 600 meters.

112/2M, 10 Beach Road, South Pattaya

Tel: 038 710 733

Edited by simple1
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Italian - Don Joe. Best steak I've had in Pattaya and only 500 baht, good seafood also very good pizza & Italian deserts (subjective of course!). In Walking Street, the second Italian Restaurant on the right hand side after entering from Beach Road, approx 600 meters.

112/2M, 10 Beach Road, South Pattaya

Tel: 038 710 733

Second this!

Also awesome eggplant Parmesan. Agree the pastas are very good but I will demur on the pizzas. A little pricey (B350 for eggplant) but enough for two to share or for one hungry man.

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It might be good to add these places to the Pattaya restaurant map?

If you know where they are and feel they are worth visiting then by all means feel free to add them. Was rather hoping that only places that someone enjoyed and would return to would get added rather than just every place that opens and sells food. That way we all know the places on there at least have some fans.

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It might be good to add these places to the Pattaya restaurant map?

If you know where they are and feel they are worth visiting then by all means feel free to add them. Was rather hoping that only places that someone enjoyed and would return to would get added rather than just every place that opens and sells food. That way we all know the places on there at least have some fans.

Jayman, just an idea, make it for all places. Is there a way you can add the option for a ratings bar etc.? If so, then all eateries in Patts would/could end up on the map with an overall rating.

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It might be good to add these places to the Pattaya restaurant map?

If you know where they are and feel they are worth visiting then by all means feel free to add them. Was rather hoping that only places that someone enjoyed and would return to would get added rather than just every place that opens and sells food. That way we all know the places on there at least have some fans.

Jayman, just an idea, make it for all places. Is there a way you can add the option for a ratings bar etc.? If so, then all eateries in Patts would/could end up on the map with an overall rating.

There is no major issue to allow all places but then the map starts to be a bit cluttered. I was hoping to leave it just for recommended places. That way when you're out and about you can pull out your phone and open google maps and see if there are any recommended spots near you. Of course the original idea was just for everyone to be able to easily describe where the place they were recommending was rather than just saying on this soi near the 7/11.

As for ratings.. you are free to write whatever comments you want. If the spot is already on the map then feel free to add your comments to it.

I might be able to put together an html based template that we all could use as a base when adding a place that would allow a rating but I think it might get overly complicated.

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I like the idea of mostly including only specifically RECOMMENDED restaurants. Indeed there must be THOUSANDS of restaurants in the region. Most NOT particularly recommendable.

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I like the idea of mostly including only specifically RECOMMENDED restaurants. Indeed there must be THOUSANDS of restaurants in the region. Most NOT particularly recommendable.

I agree, but it looks like some restaurant owners have already started recommending their own places.

I base this assumption on some very lame reviews found in the map.

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I like the idea of mostly including only specifically RECOMMENDED restaurants. Indeed there must be THOUSANDS of restaurants in the region. Most NOT particularly recommendable.

I agree, but it looks like some restaurant owners have already started recommending their own places.

I base this assumption on some very lame reviews found in the map.

I guess it can't be helped unless someone decides they have the credibility to delete items.

Even with that, food taste is of course quite subjective.

Myself I think a place that does better than average pad krapow for 60 baht is worth noting, some others may think only world class star worthy formal restaurants are worth noting.

Edited by Jingthing
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OK, I told you this is Hit & Run concept can be FLEXIBLE, so now I will stretch that even more.

Here is a hit and run more about a wished for food type.

****************************************

Korean Fried Chicken

KFC Gangnam Style?

Korean Fried Chicken is a big deal in Korea and many USA cities. In the U.S., non-Koreans have discovered it as well and it has become a big business.

So why here in Asia's biggest beach city don't we have a visible outlet for Korean Fried Chicken? No, it is not generally found at standard Korean restaurants.

Maybe its available here at Korean nightclubs, bars, but hidden from the non-Korean eyes.

Interestingly some years ago I did see a Korean Chicken joint located right next to this eye clinic:

http://www.pattayaey...le&Id=538635539

I talked to the people there and it seemed all they spoke was Korean and there was only a short Korean menu.

They said 400 baht but couldn't communicate 400 baht for what exactly? It would have helped if there were other customers and I could see what they were selling. I suspect that place was a Korean Fried Chicken outlet. I reckon they aren't there anymore, but maybe they are. Perhaps if you are in the area, you could report about that.

Well, my general point is, why not a more visible specialized Korean Fried Chicken business in Pattaya with English/Thai/Russian menu? It seems that fried chicken is internationally popular, like spaghetti, and there is a huge potential market for a BETTER and DIFFERENT style of fried chicken, which many people think describes KOREAN fried chicken.

http://www.nytimes.c...yt&emc=rss&_r=0

Korean-style fried chicken is radically different, reflecting an Asian frying technique that renders out the fat in the skin, transforming it into a thin, crackly and almost transparent crust. (Chinese cooks call this “paper fried chicken.”) The chicken is unseasoned, barely dredged in very fine flour and then dipped into a thin batter before going into the fryer. The oil temperature is a relatively low 350 degrees, and the chicken is cooked in two separate stages.

More on the trend in the US:

http://clatl.com/atl...ent?oid=1273064

Korean fried chicken has hit Atlanta and the response has been positively cultish. What sets this new-fangled "KFC" apart is the double-frying method that produces a crunchy crust as greaseless as it is light. The manageable chunks of juicy chicken are then tossed in a sauce or served straight up. Most establishments fry each bird to order, so be prepared to wait around 15-20 minutes — a small price to pay for such perfect poultry.

OK, this IS happening in Bangkok.

But not Pattaya.

http://travel.cnn.co...d-korean-694818

****************************************

Edited by Jingthing
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There is a thai restaurant in BKK that is quite popular called Somtam Nua. Their fried chicken is to die for. Nearly every table in there has a basket of it on the table. A place like somtam Nua in pattaya would be a huge hit. In BKK, it's always packed. I'm talking like a wait outside for a tbel packed.

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g293916-d2055267-Reviews-Somtam_Nua_Siam_Square-Bangkok.html

http://www.thaiaholic.com/details.php?lang=E&tsect_id=1&post_id=246

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OK, I told you this is Hit & Run concept can be FLEXIBLE, so now I will stretch that even more.

Here is a hit and run more about a wished for food type.

****************************************

Korean Fried Chicken

KFC Gangnam Style?

Korean Fried Chicken is a big deal in Korea and many USA cities. In the U.S., non-Koreans have discovered it as well and it has become a big business.

So why here in Asia's biggest beach city don't we have a visible outlet for Korean Fried Chicken? No, it is not generally found at standard Korean restaurants.

Maybe its available here at Korean nightclubs, bars, but hidden from the non-Korean eyes.

Interestingly some years ago I did see a Korean Chicken joint located right next to this eye clinic:

http://www.pattayaey...le&Id=538635539

I talked to the people there and it seemed all they spoke was Korean and there was only a short Korean menu.

They said 400 baht but couldn't communicate 400 baht for what exactly? It would have helped if there were other customers and I could see what they were selling. I suspect that place was a Korean Fried Chicken outlet. I reckon they aren't there anymore, but maybe they are. Perhaps if you are in the area, you could report about that.

Well, my general point is, why not a more visible specialized Korean Fried Chicken business in Pattaya with English/Thai/Russian menu? It seems that fried chicken is internationally popular, like spaghetti, and there is a huge potential market for a BETTER and DIFFERENT style of fried chicken, which many people think describes KOREAN fried chicken.

http://www.nytimes.c...yt&emc=rss&_r=0

Korean-style fried chicken is radically different, reflecting an Asian frying technique that renders out the fat in the skin, transforming it into a thin, crackly and almost transparent crust. (Chinese cooks call this “paper fried chicken.”) The chicken is unseasoned, barely dredged in very fine flour and then dipped into a thin batter before going into the fryer. The oil temperature is a relatively low 350 degrees, and the chicken is cooked in two separate stages.

More on the trend in the US:

http://clatl.com/atl...ent?oid=1273064

Korean fried chicken has hit Atlanta and the response has been positively cultish. What sets this new-fangled "KFC" apart is the double-frying method that produces a crunchy crust as greaseless as it is light. The manageable chunks of juicy chicken are then tossed in a sauce or served straight up. Most establishments fry each bird to order, so be prepared to wait around 15-20 minutes — a small price to pay for such perfect poultry.

OK, this IS happening in Bangkok.

But not Pattaya.

http://travel.cnn.co...d-korean-694818

****************************************

I don't know if it resembles Korean fried chicken, but there's a new Japanese counter in the food court at Central Mall. It's the first counter when you come in from the car park, nearest the toilets. They have pieces of fried chicken on the counter they sell for 15 baht each. I find it quite delicious and they can make a nice little salad to go with it.

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In both Korea and Korean FC in the U.S. olive oil (very expensive in Thailand) is typically used plus there is special slower more laborious cooking process. Of course the better places the chicken is cooked to order. That's why this product if its a good version must be priced rather high. Korean FC is a specific thing.

This company is probably the biggest franchise player (it's Korean, not barbeque, Bee Bee Q):

http://www.bbqchickenusa.com/

http://bbdotqusa.com...stCoastMenu.pdf

The "Olive Chicken" section is likely their core offering.

I see they have a Singapore (multiple locations), Malaysia (three locations), and an Asian Pacific website. Coming to Thailand hopefully?

It is being marketed as a "healthier" fried chicken and I think it probably is.

Central Mall seems perfect for them, eh?

Edited by Jingthing
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It is being marketed as a "healthier" fried chicken and I think it probably is.

Central Mall seems perfect for them, eh?

I don't mind loading up on fried chicken while keeping dietary carbs low.

Olive oil is too unsaturated to use for cooking. It's too heat sensitive and it can quickly become toxic (oxidized) when heat is applied. It should be consumed fresh. It's far better to use more stable saturated oils for cooking or frying (coconut oil is good). It's such a big marketing con to suggest that these of type of healthy unsaturated oils will produce healthy cooked food.

Edited by tropo
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I'd have to know a lot more about the actual cooking process for Korean fried chicken with olive oil to have an opinion about what you are suggesting. Maybe they don't heat it very high. I just don't know. I do know they use a different process than standard fast food fried chicken and that it takes a long time to do it. For example, I know that in small Korean fried chicken shops where they are cooking it from scratch you have to wait 30 minutes. I reckon the chains don't do it that way, they are probably constantly cooking to have it ready. Not saying you're wrong. Just don't know.

Edited by Jingthing
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Olive oil shouldn't get too hot. It gets bitter from that. So it's not really suitable for frying.

Sent from my GT-N7000 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Olive oil shouldn't get too hot. It gets bitter from that. So it's not really suitable for frying.

Sent from my GT-N7000 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Understood. But don't you think businesses that specialize in making fried chicken with olive oil UNDERSTAND how to cook with olive oil and not make their food bitter? I have confidence that they do. I sautee with olive oil all the time, of course not at high heat.

Also it doesn't need to be olive oil to be legit Korean fried chicken. It needs to follow their different technique which is described somewhat in the link before.

Edited by Jingthing
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Olive oil shouldn't get too hot. It gets bitter from that. So it's not really suitable for frying.

Sent from my GT-N7000 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Understood. But don't you think businesses that specialize in making fried chicken with olive oil UNDERSTAND how to cook with olive oil and not make their food bitter? I have confidence that they do. I sautee with olive oil all the time, of course not at high heat.

Also it doesn't need to be olive oil to be legit Korean fried chicken. It needs to follow their different technique which is described somewhat in the link before.

that indeed can be assumed >_>

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Olive oil is too unsaturated to use for cooking.

Crazy talk...

You're the crazy talker here...

A mini education.

Unsaturated oils (with unsaturated carbon bonds) are extremely reactive to heat, light and oxygen. Add heat and the unsaturated bonds will immediately become oxidized or cleaved into toxic residue when the heat becomes severe (smoking hot).

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I think no need to make a big thing about olive oil in this space! We don't even have a Korean chicken outlet in town yet (except if that one I saw before is still there and you kind of need to be Korean to eat there anyway). When we get one (I think we will, it's a trend) we don't know yet if they will be using olive oil anyway. So I think this is kind of a back burner thing for now.

Edited by Jingthing
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I think no need to make a big thing about olive oil in this space! We don't even have a Korean chicken outlet in town yet (except if that one I saw before is still there and you kind of need to be Korean to eat there anyway). When we get one (I think we will, it's a trend) we don't know yet if they will be using olive oil anyway. So I think this is kind of a back burner thing for now.

That's what happens when I get flamed for explaining scientific fact. As long as I don't get flamed again I'll drop it.

Cheers

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Now, now. This is a HAPPY thread. Where to get tasty vittles. emot-kiss.gif

On that note, mentioned before, but I can flesh it out now as I've been there:

**************************************************

La Taverna del Passatore

Italian Restaurant, Italian Style

A casual open air Italian bistro style shophouse restaurant. Italian owned and run. Italian customers. Good signs, right? Yes, indeed.

Menu includes appetizers, pastas 200 bahtish plus range (wide choice of pastas including Tagliatelle, an extensive and authentic sophisticated range of sauces, main meat dishes served with choice of potato (pork, fish, chicken, some beef) 200 to 300 bahtish range, and desserts like tiramisu and panacotta (100 bahtish).

Dishes come with some Italian bread.

Also side dishes like spinach, 80 baht.

Also featured: DAILY specials, generally a special of the night pasta and special of the night meat offering.

Location: off Soi Buakow, head south from Soi Lengkee about one block. On the corner to to the right is bar girl cum restaurant called the BIG EASY. Also there is a sign pointing down that soi about the Italian restaurant. Go down that soi a bit, the place is on the right.

I think open for lunch and dinner. Can't confirm exact hours.

**************************************************

Edited by Jingthing
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