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NCPO orders undermine political parties; a hurdle to free and fair election, say politicians


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NCPO orders undermine political parties; a hurdle to free and fair election, say politicians

By KAS CHANWANPEN 
THE NATION

 

8166bbe76d1ba716ecab8e4c5da98c06.jpeg

// The Nation photo

 

THE NATIONAL Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) and the orders it has issued remain a major obstacle in ensuring a free and fair election, a public forum on elections and the country’s future was told.

 

Chaturon Chaisang, core leader of the Pheu Thai Party, said the new political system designed under junta-sponsored laws would render the election meaningless, leaving voters with the right to vote but unable to truly determine the country’s leaders or public policies.

 

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A commemoration of the 1973 student uprising is held yesterday at the October 14 memorial, marking the 45th anniversary of the bloodshed fighting a military regime. // The Nation photo

 

In the name of peace and order, the NCPO kept the ban on political activities including the political campaign, he said. Although the regime promised to lift the ban in December, the veteran politician predicted that the campaign would still be limited.

 

“The only thing allowed to be communicated is how amazing this [Prayut Chan-o-cha]’s administration is,” Chaturon said at the forum at Thammasat University yesterday on the 45th anniversary of the October 14, 1973 student uprising against a military regime. 

 

“The political campaign is actually in the law. But they forbid [us] from doing it, citing peace and order. But it destroys the spirit of the election,” said Chaturon, who was a student activist during the 1973 uprising.

 

When the election becomes meaningless, Chaturon said the coup-installed regime would be able to retain its power. The only way to reverse it would be for the public to pressure for a free and fair election.

 

Pheu Thai is seen as a target of the regime’s alleged abuse of power and currently fears party dissolution like its predecessors – Thai Rak Thai and People’s Power parties. Chaturon said he did not think there would be a dissolution of the party because there were no concrete reasons or evidence to prove Pheu Thai had done anything wrong. However, if such a mishap does occur, Chaturon said he believed Pheu Thai MPs could find shelter in other parties. 

 

In case Pheu Thai could not really run in the election, he said the party’s core leaders would root for other pro-democracy parties, encouraging its supporters to vote for them.

 

Piyabutr Saengkanokkul, secretary-general of the Future Forward Party (FWP), similarly said that the junta’s laws had been written to undermine rather than promote political parties’ rights and freedom.

 

The FWP recently became a victim of the junta’s restrictions and was ordered by the Election Commission (EC) to stop accepting donations. Piyabutr yesterday called on the agency to interpret the limited laws to benefit parties rather than cause more difficulties.

 

“All agencies, including the EC, should realise that the NCPO is now in decline and will soon be gone. [But the agencies] will stay even after the election. So, they should stand by democracy, not the coup-installed regime. Be the cogs in the wheel of democracy, not the NCPO,” he said. 

 

The other speakers at the forum hosted by an election watchdog, Free Fair & Fruitful Election, included representatives from various civil society groups and political parties such as Rames Ratanachaweng from the Democrat Party and Pradon Prisananatakul from Chart Thai Pattana Party.

 

They said the elections could not be truly free and fair unless political parties and voters enjoy full freedom.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/politics/30356433

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-10-15
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Civil wars don't start overnight.

 

There has to be a lead up.

 

Frequently "reasonable" people like to try and talk it through and do things the way that is still uncomfortable for the "unreasonable" people............but not as destructive for all and sundry.

 

But unreasonable people don't like to listen because they are........unreasonable.

 

That's when the reasonable people also start to become..........unreasonable.

 

That's the thing to watch for.

 

That's when........"it begins".

 

 

 

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"...THE NATIONAL Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) and the orders it has issued remain a major obstacle in ensuring a free and fair election, a public forum on elections and the country’s future was told..."

 

While I am glad to see it (finally) being said, whispers at a public forum are not sufficient.

 

Politicians (all of them) and their parties (all of them) need to be screaming this message from the rooftop of every structure in Thailand that has one. Further, there must be a message that the election as it stands isn't free or fair. Finally, the candidates and their parties need to make it clear that they will not participate further unless there is fairness.

 

Given a reasonably free and fair election, I have confidence in the Thai people to make the correct decisions, and if they don't then they'll suffer the consequences, not me.

 

However, the worst possible outcome and one that should be avoided at any cost is the Junta claiming an unearned, "legitimate" mandate. If the Thai people allow that then poor, sad, beloved Thailand will pass away and be replaced with something darker and without the 'brimming with life and joy' spirit we all love.

 

As the old saying goes...

 

Speak now or forever hold your peace...

 

 

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

leaving voters with the right to vote but unable to truly determine the country’s leaders or public policies.

Which is exactly what it was designed to do. Its taken a new constitution, a determined team of anti-democratic legal designers and a mass of 'orders' to reach this point where voters have been given the illusion of democracy by finally getting a vote but in reality a result that has been predetermined. 

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57 minutes ago, TKDfella said:

If that was a photo of the 'public forum' there are a lot of empty seats...does this reflect how much Thai people really care?

Or how afraid they are to show any public support critical political thinking?

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

Chaturon Chaisang, core leader of the Pheu Thai Party, said the new political system designed under junta-sponsored laws would render the election meaningless, leaving voters with the right to vote but unable to truly determine the country’s leaders or public policies.

The election is fair, so long as the right person is voted in! If not it won't happen?

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10 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

"...THE NATIONAL Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) and the orders it has issued remain a major obstacle in ensuring a free and fair election, a public forum on elections and the country’s future was told..."

 

While I am glad to see it (finally) being said, whispers at a public forum are not sufficient.

 

Politicians (all of them) and their parties (all of them) need to be screaming this message from the rooftop of every structure in Thailand that has one. Further, there must be a message that the election as it stands isn't free or fair. Finally, the candidates and their parties need to make it clear that they will not participate further unless there is fairness.

 

Given a reasonably free and fair election, I have confidence in the Thai people to make the correct decisions, and if they don't then they'll suffer the consequences, not me.

 

However, the worst possible outcome and one that should be avoided at any cost is the Junta claiming an unearned, "legitimate" mandate. If the Thai people allow that then poor, sad, beloved Thailand will pass away and be replaced with something darker and without the 'brimming with life and joy' spirit we all love.

 

As the old saying goes...

 

Speak now or forever hold your peace...

 

 

I don't suspect anyone was supposed to figure this out until after the election when it would have been (will be?) too late. Unfortunately the apathy regarding the election and the perception that everything is already determined may mean this realization may not help save the day.

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All this well intended and decent constructed conversations and theories as to a positive push for the future of Thailand might be all moot on a deeper level. 

 

No change will ever come until the traditional roots, and their cause and effect, are removed. 

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