Jump to content

Not so good service - what would you do?


OneMoreFarang

Recommended Posts

Today I was a the main dealer from a well known (but in Thailand small) motorcycle brand. I bought my bike there a couple of months ago.

 

Today I asked them to check a few minor things like the clutch cable. And I asked them to grease the chain.

In theory I could do these jobs myself but my bike has no center stand and the service is not so expensive and the shop is near my home so I thought let the professionals do it.

 

The only problem is that the so called professionals didn't do a professional job.

They cleaned my chain and put some grease on it (professional motorcycle products) and then I paid and drove away.

But my rear break worked very bad - like it had grease on the brake...

So I turned around and told the guys in the shop about the problem. One guy came out and he explained to me that when they put (spray) grease on the chain that must have sprayed on the rear disk and this is why it breaks so bad. Really? Tell me something I didn't know.

First the guy pretended that is somehow the way it has to be but I told him go and take my bike and clean the brake - it's your responsibility.

He took the bike into the shop, they cleaned the brake and later he drove the bike for maybe 5 minutes around the block. Now the rear break is ok. Not perfect but usable. I guess it will get better over the next kilometers.

 

I think something like this shouldn't happen. They should know that they should make sure no (spray) grease covers the brake.

I could go the boss and explain it to him, but my experience with Thais is it's likely they wouldn't like to hear this.

I can just ignore it and hopefully next time they do a better job.

But then I also ask myself: If they don't even know such an everyday thing, how should I expect that they do a good job i.e. with setting the valve tolerance?

I don't want to stand behind them and look and tell them what to do. They won't like that - I also wouldn't like it if it would be my work.

 

What would you do?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I was a the main dealer from a well known (but in Thailand small) motorcycle brand. I bought my bike there a couple of months ago.
 
Today I asked them to check a few minor things like the clutch cable. And I asked them to grease the chain.
In theory I could do these jobs myself but my bike has no center stand and the service is not so expensive and the shop is near my home so I thought let the professionals do it.
 
The only problem is that the so called professionals didn't do a professional job.
They cleaned my chain and put some grease on it (professional motorcycle products) and then I paid and drove away.
But my rear break worked very bad - like it had grease on the brake...
So I turned around and told the guys in the shop about the problem. One guy came out and he explained to me that when they put (spray) grease on the chain that must have sprayed on the rear disk and this is why it breaks so bad. Really? Tell me something I didn't know.
First the guy pretended that is somehow the way it has to be but I told him go and take my bike and clean the brake - it's your responsibility.
He took the bike into the shop, they cleaned the brake and later he drove the bike for maybe 5 minutes around the block. Now the rear break is ok. Not perfect but usable. I guess it will get better over the next kilometers.
 
I think something like this shouldn't happen. They should know that they should make sure no (spray) grease covers the brake.
I could go the boss and explain it to him, but my experience with Thais is it's likely they wouldn't like to hear this.
I can just ignore it and hopefully next time they do a better job.
But then I also ask myself: If they don't even know such an everyday thing, how should I expect that they do a good job i.e. with setting the valve tolerance?
I don't want to stand behind them and look and tell them what to do. They won't like that - I also wouldn't like it if it would be my work.
 
What would you do?
You like the convenience and the cost of the shop. It seems like a simple and minor oversight and it seems they did right by you in addressing the issue. Don't make these guys the enemy. See how it goes next time.

Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bring in some treats.... even if its part of service, they like to know and they appreciate the when you acknowledge and give something back.,

Link to post
Share on other sites

My Honda dealer has very good staff don't know there qualifications if any but they do a good service.

I can also see what there doing from the air-con room with my coffee & biscuits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, papa al said:

You must be a poor tipper.

Ok, what would you suggest is a reasonable tip? And how to give it to them?

 

Some time ago, with another bike in another shop, I wanted to give some tip to the "nong" who did lots of work.

The boss, who was the top mechanic, didn't want that I give him any tip. So later I did that behind the boss back.

 

With that experience I gave the mechanic who did the 1,000km inspection on my new bike 100B tip outside the building so that others don't see it. Good enough?

 

Today the total bill was only 200B for service. I didn't give them any tip.

 

Should I always give them tip?

How much?

And give it to the individual mechanic who I see? Because maybe others worked on the bike in the back?

Or should I ask them if they have a tip box or something like this.

I could also buy them a bottle of Whisky, but I am not so sure that is a good idea...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chalk it up to experience, I have learnt here that if you can do it yourself then do it.

Past and present interaction with so called trades or professionals has been a huge dissapointment......

 

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Edit: why does everybody feel the need to tip on top of a service that is being provided at a going or negotiated rate??

Link to post
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, ChristianBlessing said:

You like the convenience and the cost of the shop. It seems like a simple and minor oversight and it seems they did right by you in addressing the issue. Don't make these guys the enemy. See how it goes next time.

Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

Thanks, I don't want to make them my enemy, this is why I ask here.

 

But I think an "oversight" like that just shouldn't happen.

Giving a customer a bike with a not working rear break is not exactly a minor cosmetic problem...

Link to post
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, AlexRich said:

Buy a car? A bike’s a wing and a prayer at the best of time, but in Thailand ... not for me.

Why post on a motorcycle forum if you do not ride ?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thailand is the land of the biffo. You should have given them a bunch of fives. Even PM Prayut says he would give journalists a punch in the mouth. Also a popular sport with airport security guards.

In Thailand you should share the usual manly Thai goodwill. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, canthai55 said:

O ring or X ring chain - no lubrication required. Brush off the crud and good to go.

 

The o and x rings keep the lube inside the chain to lubricate the pins on the roller bushings. The lube spray is for the lubrication of the metal to metal connection where the roller touches the sprocket. O ring and x ring chains need regular lubrication. The rollers should never look dry or 'shiny'.

 

Chain wax is a good option if people don't like the mess of traditional lube. Plenty of good brands around. I prefer Maxima brand, but have used the Bel Ray and a few others with good results.

 

To the OP. Everyone has bad days, even the guys swinging the wrenches at your local shop. Give them another try and just add a careful reminder that the lube is only required on the chain and that the brake caliper and disc is lubed enough. Do it with a smile and they will understand. The quality of mechanics at Honda and Ducati I have seen first hand have been good.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldnt really worry about it ,I have got spots of grease/wd40 on my rear disk when cleaning/greasing chain loads of times.......you are only supposed to use the rear brake a small amount anyway,normally 70% front braking 30%rear braking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, taninthai said:

I wouldnt really worry about it ,I have got spots of grease/wd40 on my rear disk when cleaning/greasing chain loads of times.......you are only supposed to use the rear brake a small amount anyway,normally 70% front braking 30%rear braking.

The chain is usually on the left, the disk is usually on the right (except if you have double disks). Whack a piece of cardboard behind the chain when spraying towards the wheel. I think you would have to be quite negligent/scattergun to get some on the disk. I have lubed chains on several different bikes hundreds of times and never sprayed the rear disk or brake. I totally disagree with your last sentence that the rear brake is somehow not important as it is used less than the front brake. I would not want a rear brake that was not working.

 

To the OP :

 

Look for a motorcycle repair / maintenance shop that gets a lot of local custom. I have found here that often dealers (with a big shiny showroom that looks great) have one or two mechanics who have no interest in working or doing things properly. The dealer doesn't give a **** 'cos they make their money from selling bikes on finance. This doesn't apply to all dealers but quite a lot of them.

 

If the only way a shop is making any profit is from fixing bikes, then there is a greater incentive for them to try to do a better job. As ever in Thailand, follow the [Thai] crowd. They know who is any good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Farangwithaplan said:

Everyone has bad days, even the guys swinging the wrenches at your local shop. Give them another try and just add a careful reminder that the lube is only required on the chain and that the brake caliper and disc is lubed enough.

Good idea. Now I will try to tell that to them in Thai. I guess after that they will lubricate only the brake 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Briggsy said:

Look for a motorcycle repair / maintenance shop that gets a lot of local custom. I have found here that often dealers (with a big shiny showroom that looks great) have one or two mechanics who have no interest in working or doing things properly. The dealer doesn't give a **** 'cos they make their money from selling bikes on finance. This doesn't apply to all dealers but quite a lot of them.

 

If the only way a shop is making any profit is from fixing bikes, then there is a greater incentive for them to try to do a better job. As ever in Thailand, follow the [Thai] crowd. They know who is any good.

I understand your thinking and it makes sense.

But the bike is new and under warranty for the next two years. So if possible I like to let the original dealer do the work.

Maybe I can convince the chief mechanic to do the work himself or at least supervise it.

Let's look what the next visits will bring...

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Briggsy said:

totally disagree with your last sentence that the rear brake is somehow not important as it is used less than the front brake. I would not want a rear brake that was not working.

I didn’t really say is not important though did I..and in U.K. we are taught approx 70% front 30% rear,,I do a fair bit of racetrack riding and don’t even use the back brake on track that’s what we are advised by instructors when learning to ride fast on track ,rarely use it on a bigger engined road bike,, off roading andwhen on a little scooter it gets used a little.yeah sometimes I can be a little careless when spraying oil , I’m certainly no perfectionist👍

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

What would you do?

Work on it myself.

None of my bikes have seen the insides of a m/c dealer in over 35 years...

But then i also don't own any FI bikes currently. I have, but not now......

3 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

how should I expect that they do a good job i.e. with setting the valve tolerance?

Be afraid, very afraid...

3 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Now the rear break is ok. Not perfect but usable. I guess it will get better over the next kilometers.

No. Those pads are toast.

The outer friction material is now impregnated. The only way to get a semblance of workabilty back, is to machine/file/grind a minimum 1mm off. Sorry. Best just buy new pads.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, OneMoreFarang said:

But the bike is new and under warranty for the next two years. So if possible I like to let the original dealer do the work.

I would'nt give a shIt about warranty and service books filled out etc over here. Regardless of brand. It's all a load of bollo#ks anyway.

I'm thinking of a new bike at the mo, still undecided which one, Japanese or European brand. Be a while yet.

I can tell you a fact, the last time my bike is seen inside the dealership is the day i buy it & ride away.

Sure, keep sweet with the manager , buy an oil filter if in stock etc, but if i need any proper parts like a cam cover gasket or rear sprocket, or heaven forbid, an eansy weansy valve shim, is it in stock? Is it hell.

Cheaper, faster & less stressful to order from a specialist in the UK & post it here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your options are fairly obvious, go back to the shop and go on shooting rampage 🙂

 

But on a more serious note, there is nothing you can do, but not to go back.

 

To make you feel better, i took my bike to change popped tire at a shop across the road from my biz and i give them lots of biz as i also have bike for rent.

 

They changed the rubber and off i went.

 

Not far down the road, i realized i do not have ANY brakes. Purely luck i was riding slow. 

 

As i was already closer to home, i decided it was safer to ride home instead of back to the shop.

 

Called them and told them they have 10 mins to get their lazy asses to my house to have it fixed.

 

2 dumbo's who showed up, thought it was funny that they forgot to reconnect the brakes.

 

Went back to the shop, expressed my "sastisfaction" and asked if they would have paid for all the damages including my hospital bill if i had crashed? Naturally got no response.

 

What did i do, never went back as that is all you can do. You would think at least an apology and a full refund for the troubles, but nope, nothing, just idiotic smiles with an open mouth dribbling.

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Farangwithaplan said:

 The lube spray is for the lubrication of the metal to metal connection where the roller touches the sprocket.

And how long will it stay on the sprockets ?  5 seconds ?

The inside of the roller has the lube, the O or X ring keeps it in. The roller 'rolls' around the sprocket, lubed from the inside.

Lube on the outside ? 555

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, canthai55 said:

... Lube on the outside ? 555

Anyone who rides in the dirt knows that the lube on the outside is for catching dirt and sand so it can polish the rust off those annoying little rollers. 🙂

 

My bro-in-law had a grungy little motocy repair shop in Loei years ago.  A local farang used to bring his Honda Goldwing in, because he trusted my bro.  Might have been just minor stuff, but the bro really did care about bikes and wouldn't cheat anyone.  He would read all the Thai bike magazines and tech articles he could find. Now he's in the USA living life large.  Cook at a Thai restaurant, fixes stuff on the side. 

 

He's the guy on the right, pic from motocross days.  His little girl is now about 26, foxy and useless. 

300613130_Goofixing.JPG.d0b27df4d76378e3f6991e5afaf9be54.JPG

 

1535621175_goowarapornoldpic.thumb.jpg.bc8fde1d1e0bba836b073935b7e9ad79.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, canthai55 said:

And how long will it stay on the sprockets ?  5 seconds ?

The inside of the roller has the lube, the O or X ring keeps it in. The roller 'rolls' around the sprocket, lubed from the inside.

Lube on the outside ? 555

http://www.linkint.com.au/rk-chains-maintenance.html

 

Laugh all you like. You are wrong and ignorant in this instance. And you show very little knowledge in basic mechanical method.

 

Because it might be hard for you to comprehend, look under the heading "Lubricating"

 

I'm also sure companys like Scottoiler would have gone out of business years ago if the fantasy you follow were true.

 

 

So care to retort with anything to back up your malarky?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, canthai55 said:

Another useless product which does SFA but cover your bike in crap

 

 

Come on... Back up your statements with some reference. I have now it is your turn.

 

You are claiming that metal on metal friction needs no lubrication (Chain to sprocket). That is junior high school general science stuff and you can't grasp it.

 

Scottoilers are a fantastic kit for people touring loaded with gear and actually understand maintenance and require longevity in their chain and sprockets.

 

What do you say about the RK Chain link I referred to? Why are you ignoring that now? You really are clueless on these matters. But I'm happy for you to prove me and RK Chains wrong..

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s funny because I have also heard that you don’t need to oil o and x ring chains ,personally I wouldn’t follow that advice though,,,,,possibly it was some silly marketing claim mis interpretted when they chains first arrived on the market.

i have always took it as you do not need to throw as much oil onto these chains just a thin coating with a wipe of the excess afterwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Farangwithaplan said:

Come on... Back up your statements with some reference. I have now it is your turn.

My reference - my over 50 years of riding.

Posting a link from a chain manufacturer - like posting a link saying how good Ford transmissions are - from Ford !

You want to cover metal parts with oil, and then ride down the road - or trails - and have all the dust, sand, and grit stick to that oil, fill your boots.

I have learned the futility of that - hence no oil on my chains.

But stick with your plan - 555

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...