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Hi all,

Am considering renovating a top floor condo but the problem I see is that the condo has a false ceiling (gyproc) with above it a cavernous roof void. It lets in a ton of noise as a result, especially since the roof void is vented to the outside world.

 

What are my options re. soundproofing the condo against noises leaking in from the roof? I'm already upgrading the (sliding) windows to higher quality UPVC profiles and double glazing but I can't figure this roof thing out.

Thanks so much

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Take a look at Rockwool ceiling insulation.  It works as a great sound barrier/absorber, and will have the added benefit of insulation (keep cool air in) and is a fire barrier.  Also, water will not destroy it, because it will not absorb, but eventually drain off.

There is a specific type for ceilings. Make sure you ask for that and specify your main goal is soundproofing.  You can also use it for wall insulation to achieve the same purposes.  Google Rockwool in Thailand for info. It is sold worldwide, but I believe they have some manufacturing in Thailand.

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16 minutes ago, spenrock said:

Take a look at Rockwool ceiling insulation.  It works as a great sound barrier/absorber, and will have the added benefit of insulation (keep cool air in) and is a fire barrier.  Also, water will not destroy it, because it will not absorb, but eventually drain off.

There is a specific type for ceilings. Make sure you ask for that and specify your main goal is soundproofing.  You can also use it for wall insulation to achieve the same purposes.  Google Rockwool in Thailand for info. It is sold worldwide, but I believe they have some manufacturing in Thailand.

Vector Thai is a distributer of Rockwool and they also sell sound attenuates.

 

Unless the noise is generated on the roof, I think it is more likely coming through the walls, windows & stairwells than the roof.

 

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It may not be the cheapest option but Sprayfoam insulation is 100% effective. I used this company 12 years ago and was very satisfied, You get sound insulation plus the roof is then waterproof and you have no chance of potential burglars taking off roof tiles and entering property.The company is still in business. Worth a quotation...   http://www.lohr-trade.com/

Lohr Trade and Consulting PTS Ltd

 

DSC_7789.jpeg

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If it is a metal roof you need something like spray on cellulose to stop the sheets getting excited when it rains.

If a tile roof suggest insulate at ceiling level directly above the ceiling (assuming you have access for both options)

Note: When buying a condo the "penthouse" may be the best but be prepared for higher energy bills if need to use a lot during the day in particular the people that do not like to avail themselves of cross flow ventillation & use aircons

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On 9/24/2021 at 8:01 AM, spenrock said:

Take a look at Rockwool ceiling insulation.  It works as a great sound barrier/absorber, and will have the added benefit of insulation (keep cool air in) and is a fire barrier.  Also, water will not destroy it, because it will not absorb, but eventually drain off.

There is a specific type for ceilings. Make sure you ask for that and specify your main goal is soundproofing.  You can also use it for wall insulation to achieve the same purposes.  Google Rockwool in Thailand for info. It is sold worldwide, but I believe they have some manufacturing in Thailand.

ROXUL called in Thailand i believe 

Rockwool (Roxul ) is better than fberglassfor sound & Heath/Cold  ,

Fiberglass isolation only good for warm or cold isolation 

 

Roxul vs Fiberglass Insulation for Soundproofing - Better Soundproofing

Edited by david555
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Sound attenuators may be packed with mineral-wool, fiberglass or cellulose as well as pack-less units designed for clean-room.

 

The design an installation is much more important than the insulation used. Anyone looking to reduce noise really should read-up on it. 

 

If noise is coming through vents, acoustic louvers can be very helpful. 

 

What kind ceiling do you have now, and how much space do you have between the ceiling and the roof?

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Yellowtail said:

Sound attenuators may be packed with mineral-wool, fiberglass or cellulose as well as pack-less units designed for clean-room.

 

The design an installation is much more important than the insulation used. Anyone looking to reduce noise really should read-up on it. 

 

If noise is coming through vents, acoustic louvers can be very helpful. 

 

What kind ceiling do you have now, and how much space do you have between the ceiling and the roof?

 

 

 

Thanks for your comment.

There's an enormous amount of space between the ceiling and roof. From my ceiling to the highest part of the roof structure is at least 5 meters. This leads me to believe that thermal insulation is the way to go. This was obviously also recommended to me in this topic, however I did this for another room/building and the results were poor. I installed Staycool on top of the false ceiling but found the sound insulation negligible.

That other building is situated on a busy road but also has a quiet side. To my surprise the rooms on the "quiet" side were actually noisier than the rooms on the roadside, due to noise coming in from the roof.

Although the rooms on the noisy road side have direct exposure to a busy road, they also have a concrete ceiling, as opposed to a false ceiling. It's weird how sound travels.

Edited by Bassosa
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On 9/23/2021 at 2:01 PM, Crossy said:

You'll probably be wanting to stick some thermal insulation up there which should provide significant sound deadening too.

 

The insulation will work wonders.  

 

It'll also help keep your room cooler if you have air-conditioned.  If not it'll turn your room into an oven.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Bassosa said:

Thanks for your comment.

There's an enormous amount of space between the ceiling and roof. From my ceiling to the highest part of the roof structure is at least 5 meters. This leads me to believe that thermal insulation is the way to go. This was obviously also recommended to me in this topic, however I did this for another room/building and the results were poor. I installed Staycool on top of the false ceiling but found the sound insulation negligible.

That other building is situated on a busy road but also has a quiet side. To my surprise the rooms on the "quiet" side were actually noisier than the rooms on the roadside, due to noise coming in from the roof.

Although the rooms on the noisy road side have direct exposure to a busy road, they also have a concrete ceiling, as opposed to a false ceiling. It's weird how sound travels.

What kind of ceiling do you have now, and how high is it?

 

Another gyp-board ceiling between the existing ceiling and below the vents will do a lot more to reduce noise than will a layer of insulation.

 

Again, installing baffles in the are will help as well. 

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47 minutes ago, Bassosa said:

I installed Staycool on top of the false ceiling but found the sound insulation negligible.

That is not at all surprising. The key to sound insulation is mass, mass, and more mass. However the mass needs to be isolated as far as possible from structures running at 90 degrees to it. The isolation needs to be small enough so the gap can be sealed with acoustic calk (or intumescent calk as that’s cheaper). The only easy way, if your ceiling structure can support the weight, is it add a couple of layers if acoustic plaster board to the ceiling, though you may have to use glue if you can’t find acoustic isolation connectors.

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On 9/27/2021 at 3:04 PM, Yellowtail said:

What kind of ceiling do you have now, and how high is it?

 

Another gyp-board ceiling between the existing ceiling and below the vents will do a lot more to reduce noise than will a layer of insulation.

 

Again, installing baffles in the are will help as well. 

Two questions about this scenario:

 

1. How to install a double false ceiling? The only method I could think of is have a welder install a metal frame that rests on top of the dividing walls. Gpyroc, smartboard or another product could rest on top? We're creating a condo out of three 28m2 studios, so we have brick dividing walls that the frame can rest on top of, perhaps after some additional brick work/leveling. Then after that install gyproc ceiling with lights etc.

 

2. Do LED ceiling lights need ventilation? In this scenario they'd be sitting in the void between the two ceilings, unventilated.

 

Cheers

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