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Car fire at Bangkok temple parking spurs emergency response


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A sudden car fire erupted in the parking lot of a well-known temple in the Bang Chak area of Bangkok, prompting a swift response from firefighting teams. The incident was reported today, April 15, and officials are currently investigating the cause.

 

Panic spread rapidly as a car caught fire in the parking lot of the famed Wat Thammongkol Thaobunnonthawihan in Bangkok’s Bang Chak district. The blaze was reported to the emergency services at 11.29am, causing a frenzy among the locals and visitors at the temple. A Facebook page, FM91 Trafficpro, shared images of the burning vehicle, capturing the urgency of the situation.

 

The temple, located on Soi Punnawithi 20, Sukhumvit 101 Road in the Bang Chak area of Phra Khanong district, is a site of reverence and a bustling hub for the local community. The unexpected incident in such a serene and sacred place shook the onlookers but the professional conduct of the rescue teams helped contain the panic.


Firefighters from the Phra Khanong Fire Station were dispatched immediately after the call. A mere 13 minutes later, at 11.42am, teams from the Sukhumvit Fire and Rescue Station arrived at the scene. They were greeted by local volunteers who had already initiated firefighting efforts, bravely tackling the flames to prevent further disaster.


The collaboration between the professional firefighters and the courageous volunteers showcased the community’s solidarity in the face of danger. It was a testament to the swift and well-coordinated emergency response system in place, which is crucial in densely populated urban areas like Bangkok.

 

As the flames were subdued, the attention turned to the cause of the fire. Initial reports did not specify the make and model of the vehicle or provide details about the owner. The exact origin of the fire also remained unclear. The investigation was underway, with authorities meticulously combing through the evidence to determine whether the fire was accidental or the result of foul play.

 

The authorities have yet to release a full report on the incident, as the investigation continues. The name of the person who reported the fire, Urupong, is credited for the initial alert, demonstrating the critical role that vigilant citizens play in ensuring public safety, reported Khaosod.

 

by Nattapong Westwood

PHOTO VIA: Dominik Sostmann FROM:Unsplash.com

 

Source: The Thaiger 2024-04-16

 

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Probably NOT an EV ... just another ICEV fire, as usual :coffee1:

 

Reported elsewhere:

"Later, at 11.42am, officials from the Sukhumvit Fire and Rescue Station arrived at the scene. Volunteers in the area put out the fire. before the fire truck arrived on site."

Edited by KhunLA
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3 hours ago, webfact said:

They were greeted by local volunteers who had already initiated firefighting efforts, bravely tackling the flames to prevent further disaster.
The collaboration between the professional firefighters and the courageous volunteers showcased the community’s solidarity in the face of danger. It was a testament to the swift and well-coordinated emergency response system in place, which is crucial in densely populated urban areas like Bangkok.

Pat on the back time

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2 hours ago, KhunLA said:

Probably NOT an EV ... just another ICEV fire, as usual :coffee1:

 

Reported elsewhere:

"Later, at 11.42am, officials from the Sukhumvit Fire and Rescue Station arrived at the scene. Volunteers in the area put out the fire. before the fire truck arrived on site."


13 times more likely to be an ICEV than an EV

 

139 times more likely to be an HEV than an EV.

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3 minutes ago, JBChiangRai said:


13 times more likely to be an ICEV than an EV

 

139 times more likely to be an HEV than an EV.

Which means it could have been an EV, as they do catch on fire.....🤭

 

It is hilarious that 2 EV owners above (not hotchilli) have come on to protect their EV rides when EV's haven't been mentioned, plus, it doesn't look like an EV fire.................😂

 

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3 minutes ago, JBChiangRai said:

 

It could be an EV, it's just unlikely

 

I can't speak for KhunLA but I posted the statistics because it's important for anyone considering an EV not to be dissuaded by inaccurate myths.

I'm just trying to keep up with the EV haters.   Find it hilarious, they suspect, imply, even blame some fires on EV, simply because they are in the area.

 

That boat sinking had to be and EV, since EVs were on it, though nobody knows how the fire started, confirmed source.   Same with that parking garage ... how many pointed to EV for both, and still do.

 

Guessing the next 100+ auto fires reported on AN, won't be EVs either.  We'll surely know immediately about the first one in TH.   That will be a long, and I'll add a few more to my "list" ... :coffee1:

 

Yes, I'm assuming the 'wat fire' wasn't an EV, as too easy to extinguish, eliminating an EV, unless everything but the battery was on fire.

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This really is a none event news story, that probably only got reported because it occurred at a “famed” Wat.

 

It seems that every time a car fire is reported, we get the pro and anti EV crowd wanting to turn the comments into the same again EV debate, and I admit I have been drawn into it, before, also. 
 

This story is just really about a “testament to the swift and well-coordinated emergency response system in place”,  that prevented any further damage.

 

Thousands of vehicle fires occur all around the world, every day and yes all types of vehicles cars, trucks, motorcycles, buses, petrol, diesel, hybrid, EV, NGV and LPG are involved and the causes of fires are many, fuel leaks, poor maintenance, accidents, arson, hybrid and EV batteries, overheating catalytic converters, electrical system failures, overheating engines, etc.

 

I am from the UK, and there are on average 300 vehicle fires recorded a day, most do not warrant a news report.

 

 

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

The blaze was reported to the emergency services at 11.29am,

Again another photo of nothing to do with this story, or did I miss the full eclipse in Thailand.

panic-mainwaring.gif.55c8b2c731652dc3d2f6805831b58aa6.gif

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34 minutes ago, brianthainess said:

Again another photo of nothing to do with this story, or did I miss the full eclipse in Thailand.

panic-mainwaring.gif.55c8b2c731652dc3d2f6805831b58aa6.gif


That is the second time this week, your comment has given me a chuckle.
 

Why would they post a relevant picture, when they can find a more dramatic one, even if it nothing to do with the story, does not show BKK fire service and is the wrong time of day.

 

Here are 2 pictures of the real incident.

 

Car I believe was a Nissan NV pickup with LPG conversion.

IMG_2404.jpeg

IMG_2403.jpeg

Edited by Georgealbert
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9 minutes ago, Georgealbert said:

That is the second time this week, your comment has given me a chuckle.

And its only Tuesday, You need to read more of my posts :giggle:

I had an NV with a LPG conversion and you could clearly see the tank on the back tray, unless he has a doughnut tank. 

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Just now, brianthainess said:

And its only Tuesday, You need to read more of my posts :giggle:

I had an NV with a LPG conversion and you could clearly see the tank on the back tray, unless he has a doughnut tank. 


Sorry, was only repeating what was reported in the Thai media, but at least the pictures are real.

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49 minutes ago, Georgealbert said:

This really is a none event news story, that probably only got reported because it occurred at a “famed” Wat.

 

It seems that every time a car fire is reported, we get the pro and anti EV crowd wanting to turn the comments into the same again EV debate, and I admit I have been drawn into it, before, also. 
 

This story is just really about a “testament to the swift and well-coordinated emergency response system in place”,  that prevented any further damage.

 

Thousands of vehicle fires occur all around the world, every day and yes all types of vehicles cars, trucks, motorcycles, buses, petrol, diesel, hybrid, EV, NGV and LPG are involved and the causes of fires are many, fuel leaks, poor maintenance, accidents, arson, hybrid and EV batteries, overheating catalytic converters, electrical system failures, overheating engines, etc.

 

I am from the UK, and there are on average 300 vehicle fires recorded a day, most do not warrant a news report.

 

 

In the UK, 300 per day out of 41,000,000 rides, and I guess most start via electricity, as most cars are not switched off even if the ignition is turned off....😋

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1 minute ago, Georgealbert said:


Sorry, was only repeating what was reported in the Thai media, but at least the pictures are real.

No need to say sorry, what is reported never seems to be accurate, or correctly translated. 

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7 minutes ago, transam said:

In the UK, 300 per day out of 41,000,000 rides, and I guess most start via electricity, as most cars are not switched off even if the ignition is turned off....😋


Sorry, not sure, as the main government data seems to compare accidental to deliberate fires.
 

Below is some boring links to how the UK data is collected, but I am not really interested in reading it in detail, any more.
 

UK recording of vehicle fires is found here,

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/64be64401e10bf000e17ccef/fire-statistics-data-tables-fire0302-270723.xlsx

 

How that data is collected for the IRS (incident reporting system) follows this,

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-statistics-incident-level-datasets/road-vehicle-fires-dataset-guidance

 

IMG_2408.jpeg

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