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Elderly rice farmer dies in field blaze in Udon Thani


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A tragic incident occurred yesterday in Udon Thani province where a 73 year old rice farmer perished in a blaze that swept through his field.

 

Police Deputy Inspector Niwat Jaengkrathok of Huai Luang Police Station, alongside medical personnel from Udon Thani Hospital Center and the Sawang Metha Tham rescue team, responded to the distress call at Ban Naklong, in the Mueang district.

 

Amidst the charred remains of rice straw, the rice farmer, Bualong’s body lay scorched by the fire that had engulfed the paddy field. Earlier that afternoon, his 41 year old daughter-in-law, Tipwaly, had seen him at home enjoying a meal. Upon her return from the market at 5pm, Bualong was nowhere to be found, prompting a search that led to the devastating discovery.


Tipwaly recounted the harrowing moments when she ventured into the fields and initially saw someone burning rice straw. Believing it to be her father-in-law, she approached only to find a knife on the ground, which filled her with a sense of dread. Her calls went unanswered, and her worst fears were confirmed upon finding Bualong’s body. She reflected on previous warnings to him not to burn the fields that day due to the stormy conditions and strong winds, reported KhaoSod.


Preliminary investigations suggest that the combination of intense heat and Bualong’s old age may have caused him to faint or collapse, leaving him at the mercy of the flames.

 

In related news, a commercial building in Pattaya was engulfed in flames last Thursday night, resulting in two individuals injured. The fire broke out at 7.06pm at a structure within the Ta Kian Tia sub-district of the Bang Lamung District in Chon Buri Province. The building was known to accommodate a shop selling kratom juice.

 

In other news, a single-storey concrete house was engulfed in flames, leading to extensive damage and a call for those responsible to come forward. This incident, which occurred on March 24, is believed to have originated from local farmers illegally burning rice straw in nearby fields, causing the fire to spread uncontrollably.

 

by Nattapong Westwood 

Photo courtesy of KhaoSod

 

Source: The Thaiger 2024-04-20

 

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

She reflected on previous warnings to him not to burn the fields that day due to the stormy conditions and strong winds,

Karma is a bitch... but justified in this case.

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57 minutes ago, Gecko123 said:

Some of the comments on this thread are unbelievable. You guys can't muster any more empathy for an elderly impoverished farmer who lost his life producing the food you eat? Sad.

 

 

 

 

He lost his life setting fire to a field.

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1 hour ago, Gecko123 said:

You make it sound like he was a pyromaniac. You're obviously clueless about why rice fields are burned after a harvest. Yes, the practice has been banned in some areas, and yes, it contributes to air pollution and climate change, but the reason why farmers continue to do this is because of its a cost effective way to clear crop residue, and in many cases, the market price doesn't compensate the farmer for the added cost to dispose of the debris in a more environmentally friendly way. 

I am not clueless, as you say... I fully understand the practice of burning and why it's done to different crops and fields.

It does not change the outcome... he died by his own hands.

 

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2 hours ago, brianthainess said:

Am I losing it ?  this is either a regurgitated story, or about the 3rd one this year who has died in almost the exact same way.      :unsure:

The old fellas are getting slower.

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32 minutes ago, 0ffshore360 said:

A farming practice in annual use for at least a millennia is suddenly the focus of attention to people who need to learn to eat rocks.

 

This farming practice in annual use at least a millennia ago before commercialisation covered a far smaller area and the resultant pollution less wide spread or severe....  the knowledge of both respiratory illness caused by burning and viable alternatives was also unknown. 

 

 

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A typical non substantiated comment in one of the threads that burning rice stubble adds to global warming - maybe it does, maybe it doesn’t. It certainly adds to localised pollution in the short term but in terms of CO2 release it is probably less than 20% of the CO2 absorbed by the rice plants during the growing season therefore at least an +80% carbon capture.

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1 hour ago, retarius said:
8 hours ago, webfact said:

She reflected on previous warnings to him not to burn the fields that day due to the stormy conditions and strong winds, reported KhaoSod.

So not concerned at all about the AQI of your fellow citizens or their guests? They can all die of asthma as far as Bualong is concerned. 

 

The priorities are somewhat different when fighting to put food on the table... its easy to judge from our ivory towers, but judge the correct people.... not the individuals who are struggling.

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Gecko123 said:

Some of the comments on this thread are unbelievable. You guys can't muster any more empathy for an elderly impoverished farmer who lost his life producing the food you eat? Sad.

 

 

 

 

He wasn't growing fish and chips was he, a hamburger, Spaghetti, roast pork?

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1 minute ago, HK MacPhooey said:

A typical non substantiated comment in one of the threads that burning rice stubble adds to global warming - maybe it does, maybe it doesn’t. It certainly adds to localised pollution in the short term but in terms of CO2 release it is probably less than 20% of the CO2 absorbed by the rice plants during the growing season therefore at least an +80% carbon capture.

 

True... its reported that with the slightly higher CO2 levels (280ppm pre-industrial revolution and 420 ppm today) increase photosynthesis / ergo plant growth has increased on a global scale.....

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, soalbundy said:

He wasn't growing fish and chips was he, a hamburger, Spaghetti, roast pork?

Have to tell you SB, I am rather surprised by your flippant remarks on this thread. Perhaps I am misrecollecting, but didn't you write a while back about listening to early morning chanting coming from different temples during your early morning walks? It's an experience I've shared, and I attributed a certain sensitivity to you as a result. Would like to think I wasn't wrong in this assessment, but as I take another glance, your member name is spelled soalbundy, not soulbundy, so maybe I was just projecting. Do you not live in a community with elderly farmers? Is it that difficult to imagine a neighbor of yours meeting this terrible fate?

 

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5 hours ago, 0ffshore360 said:

If there was a low cost method provided to small rice growers to rid the ground of rice straw that inhibits ploughing for next crop they would most likely be willing to use it.

Wifeys friend doesn't burn her rice straw. She turns it into rice bales and sells it to increase her profit even more. I have no idea why other farmers don't do the same as the guys doing the baling will do it for free and then give you a price for each bale they take away.

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37 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

This farming practice in annual use at least a millennia ago before commercialisation covered a far smaller area and the resultant pollution less wide spread or severe....  the knowledge of both respiratory illness caused by burning and viable alternatives was also unknown. 

 

 

Criticism and complaint and callous derogatory disrespect for a man who  unfortunately died performing an annual task necessary to eke out a survival income growing food for those who's only concern is feeding  own face .

The commercialism is  not a ground level. It is at corporate manipulation level that  keeps  farmers poor.

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6 hours ago, 0ffshore360 said:

If there was a low cost method provided to small rice growers to rid the ground of rice straw that inhibits ploughing for next crop they would most likely be willing to use it.

 

do i understand you right?

the health of thousands of people are less worth than the farmers income?

 

do you think it's ok if a chemical factory let the toxic waste into the next river, because that is the much cheaper way to do things and it gives every factory worker an income ...

 

you defend farmers who are selfish, reckless, greedy and responsible for health issues and death of many people ...

 

you defend illegal burning because you think the farmers have the rights of an "easier" income ... 

 

it should be a human right to breath no toxic air and to drink no toxic water ... what do you think?

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31 minutes ago, Gecko123 said:

Have to tell you SB, I am rather surprised by your flippant remarks on this thread. Perhaps I am misrecollecting, but didn't you write a while back about listening to early morning chanting coming from different temples during your early morning walks? It's an experience I've shared, and I attributed a certain sensitivity to you as a result. Would like to think I wasn't wrong in this assessment, but as I take another glance, your member name is spelled soalbundy, not soulbundy, so maybe I was just projecting. Do you not live in a community with elderly farmers? Is it that difficult to imagine a neighbor of yours meeting this terrible fate?

 

I admit I can be flippant on occasion. Of course if I saw something of the sort happening I would attempt to help. Impotent anger at farmers who cut and burn is the cause, laws aren't adhered to, there is nothing people can do. My wife doesn't have her extensive fields burnt, much of the straw is collected for the neighbours cows and buffaloes the rest is plowed back into the ground at next years planting. My village is surrounded by rice fields and yet I see no burning. I used to live in Chiang Mai and although the burning didn't affect me I knew people who did suffer and the smog was horrendous seen from Doi Suthep. One doesn't see farmers in Europe burning after a wheat harvest, there is obviously no real need to do it, perhaps the ash is a fertilizer or it's done out of tradition.

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7 minutes ago, edwinchester said:

Wifeys friend doesn't burn her rice straw. She turns it into rice bales and sells it to increase her profit even more. I have no idea why other farmers don't do the same as the guys doing the baling will do it for free and then give you a price for each bale they take away.

Wonderful utopian concept that works on a scale appropriate for demand to be supplied. On a scale where it became the norm the baler's could not give it away let alone pay for it.

A similar idea was initiated quite a few years  back aimed at sugar cane growers where the concept was to increase payouts for cane that had not been burnt out and buying the dried foliage to use as efficiently fired fuel in sugar mills.

Intended  net result was a reduction in atmospheric particle pollution. Unfortunately  not  co2.

Short lived. Increasingly  cane is being harvested by machines and the foliage dross is of no consequence  to a regenerative crop.

Unfortunately the same does not apply to rice harvested by hand or by machine. In either method the bulk of unshredded straw remains an impediment to turning the soil.

The addition of a knife shredder to the  straw exhaust of combine harvesters that reduced it  to a lawn clippings state would be ideal because  it could be turned under/into the soil to eventually  decompose adding the oh so deficient humus that is increasingly lacking in Thai soil.

 

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