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Rise in International School Costs in Thailand


webfact

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Parents of students in Thailand's international schools are facing heftier bills as education costs climbed to 2.75 billion baht in 2024. This uptick, a 1.9% increase from the previous year, covers essentials like learning materials, uniforms, and shoes.

 

There's also been a slight decline in spending on cram schools and special training, down by 0.7% to 1.49 billion baht, as parents trimmed back on extracurricular activities amid economic uncertainties. 

 

Interestingly, the country's international school sector is seeing expansion. This year alone, there's been a 3.33% increase in the number of schools, with the total now standing at 248. Eight new international schools have opened, reflecting growing competition, particularly in Bangkok's outskirts.

 

This area has witnessed increased property sales to wealthy buyers from CLMV countries (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam), fuelling demand for international education.

 

Bangkok remains a focal point for some of Thailand's priciest international schools. Leading the pack is Shrewsbury International School Bangkok, followed by International School Bangkok and NIST International School Bangkok.

 

Other noteworthy mentions include King’s College School Bangkok and Harrow International School Bangkok, which also feature prominently in the top ten for tuition fees.

 

This surge in costs underscores the financial strain on parents striving to provide quality education under the current economic climate. The rising trend raises questions about the sustainability and accessibility of international education for a broader demographic. 

 

As Thailand continues to attract expatriates and affluent residents from neighbouring countries, it appears that the demand—and costs—of international schooling will only keep climbing, challenging both parents and policymakers to find balanced solutions for educational access.

 

Picture courtesy: National News Bureau of Thailand

 

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-- 2024-06-24

 

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8 hours ago, webfact said:

1f7a941abdd54a3e100e30e9fa2ba426.webp

 

Parents of students in Thailand's international schools are facing heftier bills as education costs climbed to 2.75 billion baht in 2024. This uptick, a 1.9% increase from the previous year, covers essentials like learning materials, uniforms, and shoes.

 

There's also been a slight decline in spending on cram schools and special training, down by 0.7% to 1.49 billion baht, as parents trimmed back on extracurricular activities amid economic uncertainties. 

 

Interestingly, the country's international school sector is seeing expansion. This year alone, there's been a 3.33% increase in the number of schools, with the total now standing at 248. Eight new international schools have opened, reflecting growing competition, particularly in Bangkok's outskirts.

 

This area has witnessed increased property sales to wealthy buyers from CLMV countries (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam), fuelling demand for international education.

 

Bangkok remains a focal point for some of Thailand's priciest international schools. Leading the pack is Shrewsbury International School Bangkok, followed by International School Bangkok and NIST International School Bangkok.

 

Other noteworthy mentions include King’s College School Bangkok and Harrow International School Bangkok, which also feature prominently in the top ten for tuition fees.

 

This surge in costs underscores the financial strain on parents striving to provide quality education under the current economic climate. The rising trend raises questions about the sustainability and accessibility of international education for a broader demographic. 

 

As Thailand continues to attract expatriates and affluent residents from neighbouring countries, it appears that the demand—and costs—of international schooling will only keep climbing, challenging both parents and policymakers to find balanced solutions for educational access.

 

Picture courtesy: National News Bureau of Thailand

 

news-logo-btm.jpg

-- 2024-06-24

 

Get our Daily Newsletter - Click HERE to subscribe

Yeah those uniform costs should be dropped totally especially for the younger folks.  Also parents need to be aware whether or not the school is acredited or not if one plans on the child graduating from that school - any new school normally has to apply for accreditation depending on what type curriculum that they will teach, check on nationalities of the teachers and if possible talk to parents of children that have attended that class.  Yes, both my daughters education was mostly in international schools.  The first was funded by the Govt, while I had to pay for the second - and yes tuition for the international school was higher than the college costs here at the best colleges!  But so far I am extremely pleased with the international school of CM as my daughter is doing great at the number one university here.

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The International textbooks are very flawed though.  Special Programs and English Programs are better in terms of professional English.

 

EP, Special Program:  How to write a resume and cover letter, how to write a 5 paragraph essay in many forms and on many topics, how to use APA formatting, how to write letters and emails, how to speak in a range of situations, acting and drama.  How to read a graph.  How to make and give presentations.  Improptu speaking.  Also many other subjects taught fully in English.

 

The books are clean and modern.  Very easy to use with full online support.

 

International:  women are good here is a list of 3 athletes and a nurse.  Africans are poor, lets read this 8 page article.  I swear one page got the continents of the world wrong.  We did a 2 hour lesson on how sitting down increases your chance of dying.  We sat for the full 2 hours no break.  International English is more about politics than English skills.

 

And the books are so messy.  Its like page 5, 6, 7, 8 reading, questions on page 2 and 9.  So frustrating.

 

 

Edited by Chris Daley
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12 hours ago, Chris Daley said:

The International textbooks are very flawed though.  Special Programs and English Programs are better in terms of professional English.

 

EP, Special Program:  How to write a resume and cover letter, how to write a 5 paragraph essay in many forms and on many topics, how to use APA formatting, how to write letters and emails, how to speak in a range of situations, acting and drama.  How to read a graph.  How to make and give presentations.  Improptu speaking.  Also many other subjects taught fully in English.

 

The books are clean and modern.  Very easy to use with full online support.

 

International:  women are good here is a list of 3 athletes and a nurse.  Africans are poor, lets read this 8 page article.  I swear one page got the continents of the world wrong.  We did a 2 hour lesson on how sitting down increases your chance of dying.  We sat for the full 2 hours no break.  International English is more about politics than English skills.

 

And the books are so messy.  Its like page 5, 6, 7, 8 reading, questions on page 2 and 9.  So frustrating.

 

 

The top schools will be using IGCSE and IB, or A level resources. Your claim makes no sense whatsoever. Also, top teachers will only be using text books as reference material. They will be building their own lessons using a plethora of resources. An EP programme school,  with lower qualified teachers, less resources and lower standards cannot be compared with the type of school mentioned in this article. 

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