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Retirement Visa For Part Time Stay ?


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Hi Everybody,

I am currently retired and living in the USA, but like to stay in Thailand for the winter months, just like other people like to go to Florida or Arizona.

So I am just wondering if it would be easier to apply for a retirement visa than to try and arrange visa (s)

with multiple entries every year. (I don't like to do visa runs)

Also, I have been wondering about the retirement visa requirements and I am not quite sure if the income requirement has anything to do with the amount I am spending while in Thailand.

(I don't like to have 800000 baht tied up in a bank account if I don't have to)

So if I deposit between 200 and 400000 baht and show I have an income of $ 1500.00 pm, do I actually have to spend or transfer that money ($1500) to Thailand every month ??

Kind regards,

Freezing in Michigan

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Hi Everybody,

I am currently retired and living in the USA, but like to stay in Thailand for the winter months, just like other people like to go to Florida or Arizona.

So I am just wondering if it would be easier to apply for a retirement visa than to try and arrange visa (s)

with multiple entries every year. (I don't like to do visa runs)

Also, I have been wondering about the retirement visa requirements and I am not quite sure if the income requirement has anything to do with the amount I am spending while in Thailand.

(I don't like to have 800000 baht tied up in a bank account if I don't have to)

So if I deposit between 200 and 400000 baht and show I have an income of $ 1500.00 pm, do I actually have to spend or transfer that money ($1500) to Thailand every month ??

Kind regards,

Freezing in Michigan

If you get an extension for retirement you can stay for as much or as little time as you want. You just have to be here on the date you extension is due renewal and get a re-entry permit before you leave.

No you do not have to actually transfer the full amount of income.

To prove the income you will need a letter from the consulate, They have an appointment system now but it is not mandatory. But it does save time because you do not have to take a number.

For info see this webpage: http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/service.html

Brrrr it would be cold in Michigan about now.

Joe

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If you limit your winter visits to three months, you can simply get single entry tourist visas each year, and extend for 30 days in Thailand (no visa runs easy). Or if you want to stay longer, you could get a double entry tourist visa and take one visa run trip each year. If I was a snowbird like you, I wouldn't even think of bothering with O visas and retirement extensions.

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If I was a snowbird like you, I wouldn't even think of bothering with O visas and retirement extensions.

Why?

Once a year get the extension and do 1 or 2 90 day reports.

No need to get a visa every time you want to travel. You just buy a oneway ticket and jump on a flight any time you want.

Seems to me that there are a lot of advantages.

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If I was a snowbird like you, I wouldn't even think of bothering with O visas and retirement extensions.

Why?

Once a year get the extension and do 1 or 2 90 day reports.

No need to get a visa every time you want to travel. You just buy a oneway ticket and jump on a flight any time you want.

Seems to me that there are a lot of advantages.

Because he would be somewhat constrained by his extension renewal date each year plus the money and documentation issue(s). I would think it easier to get a double entry Tourist visa from his friendly Thai consulate before travel, then buy his one-way ticket and jump on the plane. If he were to miss his annual winter sabbatical to Thailand, for whatever reason, then he could kiss his retirement extension goodbye.

However, if he absolutely refuses to do visa runs then it sounds like a plan, until immigration says that retirement extensions are for living in Thailand. After all, staying in Thailand for the "winter months" each year, without establishing some roots in Thailand, makes him a Tourist.

If he is talking about getting an "O-A" retirement visa in the US, then I'll let somebody else clue him in.

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Because he would be somewhat constrained by his extension renewal date each year plus the money and documentation issue(s). I would think it easier to get a double entry Tourist visa from his friendly Thai consulate before travel, then buy his one-way ticket and jump on the plane. If he were to miss his annual winter sabbatical to Thailand, for whatever reason, then he could kiss his retirement extension goodbye.

However, if he absolutely refuses to do visa runs then it sounds like a plan, until immigration says that retirement extensions are for living in Thailand. After all, staying in Thailand for the "winter months" each year, without establishing some roots in Thailand, makes him a Tourist.

If he is talking about getting an "O-A" retirement visa in the US, then I'll let somebody else clue him in.

If he does his extension this month he would be in the middle of his normal time here. Also missing the extension would not be a big problem unless they change rules again and he was grandfathered.

I think you might be surprised how many people are already doing it as "snowbirds". And I don't think immigration really cares.

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I agree what the OP proposes is within the rules and possible to do. I am questioning the logic of it. As I have stayed here both ways, tourist visas and retirement extensions, I personally would consider the tourist visa route the more convenient, logical option for someone like the OP, a classic snowbird.

Edited by Jingthing
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I think we should take the OP’s statement that he prefers not to do border runs at face value and give advice on the relevant options available on this basis, ie either a non-OA visa from a consulate every year, which lets him keep the money in a US account, or a single-entry non-O visa (or failing that, a single entry tourist visa and in Thailand change to non-O at an immigration office) plus annual extensions of stay, which requires a certain amount of money in a Thai bank account to arrive at an annual total of minimum 800k together with his pension on the date of application. This money can then be used and needs to be topped up only prior to the subsequent application date.

It really depends on the intended length of stay but for stays longer than 90 days every winter the above two options satisfy the OP’s declared needs.

--

Maestro

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So I am just wondering if it would be easier to apply for a retirement visa than to try and arrange visa (s)

with multiple entries every year. (I don't like to do visa runs)

To further clarify my response to the OP, he used the phrase: just wondering if it would be easier. That is an implied question to my reading. As I have personally experienced both scenarios in my opinion only doing retirement visas/extensions is not easier than playing the shorter term visa game. The OP already knows doing tourist visas will mean visa runs. There are pros and cons to both options.

Edited by Jingthing
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So I am just wondering if it would be easier to apply for a retirement visa than to try and arrange visa (s)

with multiple entries every year. (I don't like to do visa runs)

To further clarify my response to the OP, he used the phrase: just wondering if it would be easier. That is an implied question to my reading. As I have personally experienced both scenarios in my opinion only doing retirement visas/extensions is not easier than playing the shorter term visa game. The OP already knows doing tourist visas will mean visa runs. There are pros and cons to both options.

Hello,

Thanks for you for all you responses.

For the last two years I've just got a 30 day entry visa at the airport and kept my stay at 30 days.

So I was considering doing the visa runs and stay the 90 out of 180 days, until while making a day trip to the golden triangle, one of the other passenger tried to get a 30 day visa extension and only got 15 days instead !

I was also almost stuck at the airport closing and when my departure date was looming nobody could tell me if I needed a visa extension or not.

I agree that to use the retirement option for snow birds is not the preferred way of doing things, but all other options have various disadvantages too.

The way I see the yearly visa renewal disadvantages:

1) Consulate is in Chicago, which means sending the application by UPS and possibly being without your passport for 1-2 weeks.

(or driving to Chicago and paying $ 16.00 per half an hour for parking :-( .)

2) No guarantee that the visa you request is the one you will get.

3) Visa runs

4) Airline ticket return required (?)

All in all there seem to be more disadvantages than advantages to getting the visa, the retirement visa gives you way more flexibility and peace of mind.

My original question then was more to inquire to possible pitfalls in obtaining and maintaining a retirement

visa.

I was thinking to apply for the retirement visa at the Chicago consulate, that way I have a year to fund my bank account in Thailand, but not sure if that is the best way to do it ?

[previous quote]

If he does his extension this month he would be in the middle of his normal time here. Also missing the extension would not be a big problem unless they change rules again and he was grandfathered.

[end previous quote]

Of course I would like to know why mising the extension wouldn't be a big problem ?? :o

Again thanks to all of you for all the reponses

Regards

Freezing in Michigan

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I think we should take the OP's statement that he prefers not to do border runs at face value and give advice on the relevant options available on this basis, ie either a non-OA visa from a consulate every year, which lets him keep the money in a US account, or a single-entry non-O visa (or failing that, a single entry tourist visa and in Thailand change to non-O at an immigration office) plus annual extensions of stay, which requires a certain amount of money in a Thai bank account to arrive at an annual total of minimum 800k together with his pension on the date of application. This money can then be used and needs to be topped up only prior to the subsequent application date.

It really depends on the intended length of stay but for stays longer than 90 days every winter the above two options satisfy the OP's declared needs.

--

Maestro

I can't believe anybody would recommend getting a non-OA every year just to become a "snowbird". That makes no logical sense whatsoever. Once you've actually had to round up all the non-OA documentation, you will know what I'm talking about.

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Of course I would like to know why missing the extension wouldn't be a big problem ??

The only problem might be -- needing a tourist visa (vice visa exempt entry) to get around the 'return ticket' requirement sometimes enforced by airlines.

Otherwise, now that Non Imm O visas can be obtained in Thailand, you just begin the retirement extension process from scratch within Thailand (in the old days, you would have needed to obtain a new Non Imm O from abroad). One difference from a renewal is the 21-days remaining on your last entry permit required to again initiate the retirement extension process. But, just as for renewal, you'll need your embassy income letter and your bank letter (assuming you continue going the combo route). So, either way, you'll need to visit the US Embassy (or Chiang Mai Consulate) and your bank. And, of course, Immigration.

And the other main difference from renewal is, you'll have to return to Immigration 60 days later to complete your extension process. Plus, you'll now have a new renewal date. This, as I understand it, will be 90-days from the date you apply for your retirement extension, i.e., the expiration date of your in-country obtained Non Imm O visa, and its related permitted to stay stamp. (Some have been able to get one-stop shopping, getting their Non Imm O, extension, and renewal date all on the same day. This, however, doesn't appear to be the norm.)

So, it would appear that if you plan to stay 90-180 days -- and hate border runs -- getting a retirement extension is your best bet (as one said, getting a Non Imm O-A every year would be a pain...). Each year, then, you would need to visit the Embassy/Consulate, your bank, and Immigration. If you miss renewal time, add one more trip to Immigration to the above -- plus sending your passport out for a tourist visa -- if you won't have a return ticket to Michigan.

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Hello,

[end previous quote]

Of course I would like to know why mising the extension wouldn't be a big problem ?? :o

Again thanks to all of you for all the reponses

Regards

Freezing in Michigan

What I meant is that it would not be a catastrophe. It would mean you would have buy a round trip ticket or get a tourist visa, After you got here you would go through the same process as the extension other than changing your visa.

I do not suggest going the non-oa visa route in the states, I do suggest that you get a single entry tourist visa before you leave. That would give you more time to do your extension plus no return ticket needed. At one time I would tell you to get a non-o but they apparently are pushing people to get non-oa visas so they are not giving them for being over 50.

I suggest you contact a honorary Thai consulate to get your visa. They give faster turnarounds of mail in applications. If you were to use overnight delivery of application and return of passport you could have it in 3 days. I suggest the Houston consulate from personal experience. Also Portland has been reported as giving good service. For a list of these consulates use the pull down menu at the top of this webpage. http://www.thaiembdc.org/AboutEmb/EmbDirect.aspx

It's time to get out of Michigan.

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If you miss renewal time, add one more trip to immigration to the above -- plus sending your passport out for a tourist visa -- if you won't have a return ticket to Michigan.

One might interpret this advise to mean sending your passport, using a passport agent or broker, to a Thai embassy outside Thailand to obtain a visa. That would be illegal and thus certainly not recommended.

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One might interpret this advise to mean sending your passport, using a passport agent or broker, to a Thai embassy outside Thailand to obtain a visa.

Huh? The context is the OP misses the renewal date *because* he's out of Thailand, presumably back in Michigan. I guess he could miss the renewal date *while* in Thailand -- but, I believe, that's quite a stretch to all the realistic possibilities we're discussing here.

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...So, it would appear that if you plan to stay 90-180 days -- and hate border runs -- getting a retirement extension is your best bet (as one said, getting a Non Imm O-A every year would be a pain...). Each year, then, you would need to visit the Embassy/Consulate, your bank, and Immigration. If you miss renewal time, add one more trip to Immigration to the above -- plus sending your passport out for a tourist visa -- if you won't have a return ticket to Michigan.

I was a bit puzzled, too, by that extract from an earlier post but reading it in the context of the entire paragraph I realised that it was about extensions of stay. The part about the absence of a return ticket to Michigan needs some elucidation, perhaps.

If you happen to be home in Michigan at the time when your next application for annual extension of stay is due, ie any time during the last 30 days of the current period of permission to stay, it is not the end of the world. You just start the whole process all over again, which means getting a visa and flying to Bangkok, which can be done on a one-way ticket if you prefer. If your visa is not a non-immigrant visa, it means one additional trip to the immigration office: first trip for change of visa to non-immigrant, second trip for the retirement extension. If you chose travel to Thailand without a visa you should definitely get a confirmed return flight or other flight out of Thailand within 30 days from arrival as otherwise the airline could refuse you boarding in the USA.

--

Maestro

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I've been doing what you're proposing for the past three years. Six months in the U.S., six months in Thailand. I spend the "good weather" months in Chicago and the "bad weather" months here. I tried to sell my house in the U.S. to move here full time but my timing stunk as it was when the housing market went kaput.

I went the retirement visa route. I obtained my original visa from the Thai Consulate on Rush Street in Chicago. It involved the most work because more documentation is needed for the initial visa. It didn't take long after I submitted the paperwork to get the visa, maybe three days. I've renewed twice since then at Jomtien Immigration and will apply for my third next week. The renewal seems to be the tough part as the guy who takes care of retirement visas in the Jomtien office is a completely humorless fellow who, despite my efforts, always finds something wrong and sends you to collect another copy of this or that.

I use the monthly income method which requires a notarized form from the U.S. embassy in Bangkok. For the last couple years they've sent personnel to Pattaya and other areas in Thailand to provide this and other services required by U.S. citizens, however this year they didn't do it due to budget constraints. So I have to travel to BKK and get my income form notarized. I do have a Thai bank account but it doesn't play into the equation as my monthly income satisfies the requirement. I just have to show copies of the bank book pages at the time of the visa renewal.

Before I return to the U.S. each April I obtain a single-entry permit to get back into Thailand for the next trip. I'm comfortable with this process and if the housing market recovers I'll sell the U.S. property and stay full-time in LOS.

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I can see if you plan the TIMING correctly and you plan on being in Thailand about the SAME TIME every year, the retirement extension route has many advantages. But missing the extension deadline puts you back at square one all over again and with the tourist visa route you have many more options to play around with the timing, if you get stuck you can always take a quick air trip to Malaysia and get 30 days automatically (or an additional tourist visa). Tourist visa option: MORE FLEXIBILITY.

Edited by Jingthing
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...So, it would appear that if you plan to stay 90-180 days -- and hate border runs -- getting a retirement extension is your best bet (as one said, getting a Non Imm O-A every year would be a pain...). Each year, then, you would need to visit the Embassy/Consulate, your bank, and Immigration. If you miss renewal time, add one more trip to Immigration to the above -- plus sending your passport out for a tourist visa -- if you won't have a return ticket to Michigan.

I was a bit puzzled, too, by that extract from an earlier post but reading it in the context of the entire paragraph I realised that it was about extensions of stay. The part about the absence of a return ticket to Michigan needs some elucidation, perhaps.

If you happen to be home in Michigan at the time when your next application for annual extension of stay is due, ie any time during the last 30 days of the current period of permission to stay, it is not the end of the world. You just start the whole process all over again, which means getting a visa and flying to Bangkok, which can be done on a one-way ticket if you prefer. If your visa is not a non-immigrant visa, it means one additional trip to the immigration office: first trip for change of visa to non-immigrant, second trip for the retirement extension. If you chose travel to Thailand without a visa you should definitely get a confirmed return flight or other flight out of Thailand within 30 days from arrival as otherwise the airline could refuse you boarding in the USA.

--

Maestro

"which means getting a visa and flying to Bangkok, which can be done on a one-way ticket if you prefer."

I am on my first retirement extension and for future planning purposes have been trying to weigh the disadvantages of not being in Thailand for a renewal. I was told by consulate in Coral Gables, Fl that a return

ticket was required when I got my non-immigrant "O", but did not have to be within 3 months of departure. I did apply based on Family Reunion. If I applied based on Retirement then maybe I don't need a round trip?

Other than having to get another non-immigrant visa and possibly missing out on some kind of

grandfather clause and maybe an air ticket issue, is there anything I am missing which would be a disadvantage

to not being in Thailand when it is time to renew?

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Hi Everybody,

I am currently retired and living in the USA, but like to stay in Thailand for the winter months, just like other people like to go to Florida or Arizona.

So I am just wondering if it would be easier to apply for a retirement visa than to try and arrange visa (s)

with multiple entries every year. (I don't like to do visa runs)

Also, I have been wondering about the retirement visa requirements and I am not quite sure if the income requirement has anything to do with the amount I am spending while in Thailand.

(I don't like to have 800000 baht tied up in a bank account if I don't have to)

So if I deposit between 200 and 400000 baht and show I have an income of $ 1500.00 pm, do I actually have to spend or transfer that money ($1500) to Thailand every month ??

Kind regards,

Freezing in Michigan

:o I suppose it is possible....but you're making a simple thing into a complicated thing. The easy way for you to do 3 to 6 months in Thailand (assumimg you've got the money to do it) is just to get a 60 or 90 day tourist visa before you leave the U.S.,which you can extend in Thailand without leaving the country, If you get a 90 day visa, and extend for 30 days, you've got 4 months right there. (Dec to March for example). If you want longer get a double entry 60 day visa before you leave the U.S. Stay for 60 days, get the 30 day extension in country. Then before the 2nd entry is due, pop own to Singapore (or Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, etc.) for a couple of days, and return. Another 60 days, with another 30 day extension. That's 180 days, and pretty near 6 months. That ought to take care of the winter in Michigan. No need to get fancy.

I have a retired Dutch friend who spends his summers here in Crete, and the winters in Pattya. Just uses tourist visas every year. Thailand likes tourists, he's never had a problem with tourist visas, and he's been doing it for at least 10 years now.

Personally, I like Penang for my "visa runs", but that is just a personal preference. I may try the beach in Cambodia next time (Sihanoukville).

:D

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...The easy way for you to do 3 to 6 months in Thailand (assumimg you've got the money to do it) is just to get a 60 or 90 day tourist visa before you leave the U.S.,which you can extend in Thailand without leaving the country...

I have never seen a tourist visa described like this. A tourist visa is valid for travel to Thailand for 3 months (sometimes 90 days) from the date the visa is issued and on arrival in Thailand you get permission to stay for 60 days. This permission to stay can be extended by 30 days at any immigration office. Conclusion: total stay in Thailand = 90 days. I have a feeling that winters are longer than that in Michigan, but the OP should really tells us how long he intends to stay in Thailand.

...If you get a 90 day visa, and extend for 30 days, you've got 4 months right there. (Dec to March for example...

There is a visa, the non-immigrant visa, which on arrival in Thailand gives permission to stay for 90 days but this cannot be extended by 30 days, so what you suggest is not an available option.

...If you want longer get a double entry 60 day visa before you leave the U.S. Stay for 60 days, get the 30 day extension in country. Then before the 2nd entry is due, pop own to Singapore (or Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, etc.) for a couple of days, and return. Another 60 days, with another 30 day extension. That's 180 days, and pretty near 6 months. That ought to take care of the winter in Michigan. No need to get fancy...

:o

This does not take into account the OP’s aversion to doing a border run, so let’ forget about this one, too, and consider it off topic.

...

I have a retired Dutch friend who spends his summers here in Crete, and the winters in Pattya. Just uses tourist visas every year. Thailand likes tourists, he's never had a problem with tourist visas, and he's been doing it for at least 10 years now...

And nobody has ever had a problem with a non-OA visa or with a non-O visa and retirement extensions, so why should the OP go to all the trouble of a double-entry tourist visa and a border run, considering his declared dislike of border runs? It’s like somebody says he does not like bananas, yet you are trying to force bananas down his throat.

--

Maestro

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Freezing in Michigan asked for the easiest way to spend his "winter months" in Thailand, adding that he doesn't like visa runs. Most of the respondents, some having first hand experience with the various visas, suggested that some form of Tourist visa would be appropriate for his needs. Hopefully, from all the information provided in this topic, Freezing in Michigan will get an idea of what his options are. Bananas don't enter into the equation.

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US consulates (if they don't accept a one way ticket if they demand travel details) will probably accept a one way ticket to Thailand and a one way ticket to a nearby country like Malaysia. It worked for me. The rules do vary consulate to consulate.

I realize the OP said he doesn't like visa runs. But there is a cost to not doing visa runs, and he has to ask himself if that is really what he wants. It is not a black and white situation, there are clear hassles with both options. I agree with the general sentiment, a retirement visa for a snowbird is OVERKILL.

Edited by Jingthing
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Also, I have been wondering about the retirement visa requirements and I am not quite sure if the income requirement has anything to do with the amount I am spending while in Thailand.

You can spend as much time, or as little each year,

as long as you are back at the right time each year to get your next 12 month extension.

As long as you can show the necessary income, to you Embassy and later to Immigration

that is fine. No need to remit the money to Thailand.

Just spend as much or as little as you feel is necessary.

You may even find that you like it so much that you do not want to go back to the US.

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US consulates (if they don't accept a one way ticket if they demand travel details) will probably accept a one way ticket to Thailand and a one way ticket to a nearby country like Malaysia. It worked for me. The rules do vary consulate to consulate.

I realize the OP said he doesn't like visa runs. But there is a cost to not doing visa runs, and he has to ask himself if that is really what he wants. It is not a black and white situation, there are clear hassles with both options. I agree with the general sentiment, a retirement visa for a snowbird is OVERKILL.

Thanks for all that have responded,

I am getting a much clearer picture now of what the possibilities are.

Personally I would like to go and stay in Thailand indefinitely, but I have obligations preventing me from doing just that.

I have read in the past from people trying to get e.g. a multiple entry tourist visa from the Thai Ambassy

and having received a single entry visa with no explanation given.

This makes it difficult to arrange your air travel as you might book your return flight for 4 months and then you can only stay for 3 mo.

So yes I realise that a retirement visa might be overkill and if I could be certain that I could get the right visa each and every time, then I might go for the tourist visa instead.

At one time I was considering just getting a visa at the airport and then visit e.g. Penang and get an another 30 day stamp, but that got changed to 15 days, as I understand without warning.

It is for that reason that I thought a retirement visa was the most secure way of travel, with little chance

of last minute change or by receiving a visa you didn't requested.

I will have to re-read all of your responses, I make up my mind what is the best and most advantageous for my situation.

Thank your all for your input

Still Freezing in Michigan

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One plus of getting the retirement extension would be if they changed the financial requirements at any time you would probably be grandfathered at the existing requirement.

If you went another route and then wanted to extend at a later date you would need the new requirements if they changed.

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in my experience your best bet is to apply for a multi visit non immigrant O visa in your home country each year, which will give you unlimited visits each year with no money conditions and your don't have to go near the Thai immigration people. You do have to leave Thailand every 3 months during your stay, but in may way of thinking thats an absolute necessity to remain mentally healthy. The 800,000 tbt in the bank retirement deal is absolute rip off, there is no interest earned, and you are not entitled to transfer it out of the country and immigration get upset when yoiu want to renew if can not show that you are spending it during the year, even if you are spending a reasonable amount via atm or credit card , which they do not count

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in my experience your best bet is to apply for a multi visit non immigrant O visa in your home country each year, which will give you unlimited visits each year with no money conditions and your don't have to go near the Thai immigration people. You do have to leave Thailand every 3 months during your stay, but in may way of thinking thats an absolute necessity to remain mentally healthy. The 800,000 tbt in the bank retirement deal is absolute rip off, there is no interest earned, and you are not entitled to transfer it out of the country and immigration get upset when yoiu want to renew if can not show that you are spending it during the year, even if you are spending a reasonable amount via atm or credit card , which they do not count

The OP is living in the States and we recently have had reports that they will not issue non-o visas for retirement. They will only do non-oa visas.

The OP has already stated he does not want to do visa runs.

The 800K option is not the only option. You can show income or even do a mixture of the two.

Also you can earn interest on your deposits in a Thai bank. The goverment owned banks are the only ones that I know of that have that restriction. You can also put the money in a fixed term account which will draw more interest. I have seen reports that ATM withdrawls were accepted as proof that you were spending money when the account showed little usage.

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in my experience your best bet is to apply for a multi visit non immigrant O visa in your home country each year, which will give you unlimited visits each year with no money conditions and your don't have to go near the Thai immigration people. You do have to leave Thailand every 3 months during your stay, but in may way of thinking thats an absolute necessity to remain mentally healthy. The 800,000 tbt in the bank retirement deal is absolute rip off, there is no interest earned, and you are not entitled to transfer it out of the country and immigration get upset when yoiu want to renew if can not show that you are spending it during the year, even if you are spending a reasonable amount via atm or credit card , which they do not count

The OP is living in the States and we recently have had reports that they will not issue non-o visas for retirement. They will only do non-oa visas.

The OP has already stated he does not want to do visa runs.

The 800K option is not the only option. You can show income or even do a mixture of the two.

Also you can earn interest on your deposits in a Thai bank. The goverment owned banks are the only ones that I know of that have that restriction. You can also put the money in a fixed term account which will draw more interest. I have seen reports that ATM withdrawls were accepted as proof that you were spending money when the account showed little usage.

As a newbie I would plead for the more experienced users to use their terminology less casually. When a poster says "a retirement visa" does he mean an A-O or Non Em O (single or multiple). Some posters use the terms renewal and extention interchangeably. Maybe they are the same but it does get a lilltle confusing. I am in the almost exact position as the Michigan poster i.e. NW Ohio. I would like to spend about 5 months in Chiang Mai and the rest in the US. Checking air fares and the inconvience I have ABSOLUTELY no interest in doing visa runs. FYI I recieved a Non Im O single entry out of NYC,NY with no apparent problem. Also, if relevant, I always purchase a round trip ticket. Off subject, but is there a logic to Thai Immigration making it so complicated and confusing fo the "snow bird" type of visitor. Thanks to all you helpful posters. In CM now.

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As a newbie I would plead for the more experienced users to use their terminology less casually. When a poster says "a retirement visa" does he mean an A-O or Non Em O (single or multiple). Some posters use the terms renewal and extention interchangeably. Maybe they are the same but it does get a lilltle confusing. I am in the almost exact position as the Michigan poster i.e. NW Ohio. I would like to spend about 5 months in Chiang Mai and the rest in the US. Checking air fares and the inconvience I have ABSOLUTELY no interest in doing visa runs. FYI I recieved a Non Im O single entry out of NYC,NY with no apparent problem. Also, if relevant, I always purchase a round trip ticket. Off subject, but is there a logic to Thai Immigration making it so complicated and confusing fo the "snow bird" type of visitor. Thanks to all you helpful posters. In CM now.

Agreed it does get confusing.

You were fortunate to get a single but I doubt you would of gotten a multiple non-o.

Immigration does not make it any harder for "snow birds" than someone staying here full time.

In fact for a first time application if you use the money in the bank option it is now only 60 days iinstead of 3 months so that makes it easier.

I am sure you are glad that you are not in Ohio at the moment.

Enjoy the weather in CM.

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