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American Breakfast


anothertorres

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Better yet, African food. Can't find that here either.

Good thought though, blueberry pancakes with Vermont maple syrup and American sausages, I could deal with that.

What/where is Chonlada?

I need to have a few cans first!! :o

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Better yet, African food. Can't find that here either.

African food ?

Kenya - take the example of the Masai in Kenya - nick a ein in the neck of a cow (water buff will do) and drink the blood.

Nigeria - try 'garry' which is a sort of cassava-based porridge. The only meal in my life where I have been unable to put a second spoonful in my mouthm it was so awful.

Libya - a bread roll with salad and harissa - hotter than prik thai

Egypt - rice soup with no flavout.

Central Aftica - Democratic Eepublic of Congo / Ruanda / Burundi / Zimbabwe - dried mud cales because there is no food.

Edited by Humphrey Bear
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You make a good point. African food is very varied. I suppose Moroccan food and Egyptian food are African food and they are available here. What I really crave is Ethiopian.

Can't help you there - not worked in Ethiopia.

The Ethiopians that have worked with me have eaten a basic Western breakfast of (beef) bacon and eggs - and so on in the works canteen.

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More UK drunks trying to be funny by making American hating jokes. You not funny, your too drunk all the time to be funny. Sober up for at least 10 minutes straight and maybe you could actually see how sad you are all the time.

I like the Continental Bakery in Jomtien for a good breakfast. It is the only place in the entire town that actually makes hash browns and cooks the bacon so it is not raw. Sorry to say that is the closest you are going to get to a good breakfast that I have found.

Edited by billaaa777
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Actually, Chonlada would certainly be big enough to hold all of those Americans here who want to "celebrate" Obama's inauguration, wouldn't it? I'm thinking you could just buy a couple of breakfast sandwiches at McD's, and hold the "celebration" in a phone booth somewhere! :o

As for the Chonlada location, it's on Siam CC road, about 1.2 kms east of the junction with Nongprue Road (the flashing yellow light, about 6 kms down from Suk.) It's on the right side, just around a bend in the road, directly opposite the new "Road House" bar. Always good breakfast choices; and now, she has added many more dinner items, as they've expanded to add a large new kitchen on the side of the restaurant. Some excellent dinner items; including steaks, pork tenderloin, chicken breast, grilled chicken, halibut, salmon, and fish & chips.

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Way too far for me. when I'm in town I eat breakfast at the Apec hotel. Great American buffet breakfast. Eggs, bacon, potatoes, french toast, pancakes, croissants, etc, etc, etc, and all the orange juice you can drink, for an enormous price of 110 Baht. Great value, as Beef eaters for a weekend Brunch the same.

Barry

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Way too far for me. when I'm in town I eat breakfast at the Apec hotel. Great American buffet breakfast. Eggs, bacon, potatoes, french toast, pancakes, croissants, etc, etc, etc, and all the orange juice you can drink, for an enormous price of 110 Baht. Great value, as Beef eaters for a weekend Brunch the same.

Barry

Since I'm a "Darksider", who only travels west of Suk when necessary, I have no idea where the Apec hotel is located. Directions, please, Barry? Does sound like a place worth checking out, if there's room to park a car.

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Actually, Chonlada would certainly be big enough to hold all of those Americans here who want to "celebrate" Obama's inauguration, wouldn't it? I'm thinking you could just buy a couple of breakfast sandwiches at McD's, and hold the "celebration" in a phone booth somewhere! :o

do what now?

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Way too far for me. when I'm in town I eat breakfast at the Apec hotel. Great American buffet breakfast. Eggs, bacon, potatoes, french toast, pancakes, croissants, etc, etc, etc, and all the orange juice you can drink, for an enormous price of 110 Baht. Great value, as Beef eaters for a weekend Brunch the same.

Barry

Apex, not Apec! :D

But yes good value for money breakfast. (free flowing coffee too) :o:D

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in celebration of Obama being sworn in, i'd like to have an american breakfast.

american brkft?

ahh....that would be .....2 donuts + a mug of coffee ....then out the door......nowadays :o

Hope you have health insurance ...

Or change my last name to “Lopaz“, pull my pants pockets out to appear empty, stare with a confused look on my face at the paperwork and continuously shake my head and say "no Eeeng-leeesh, no Eeeng-leeesh".....

And hope the hospital will write it off to bad debt or charity care.....yeah? :D

Edited by teacup
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What exactly is an American breakfast, I've always assumed it would be something vast incorporating eggs, steaks, pancakes bacon, etc but every hotel I've come across in Thailand seems to think it is an egg, slice of bacon, half a hotdog, with the end cut to look a bit like a flower and a slice of nearly cooked toast!! :o

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Well i lived in n america for 8 years and not once had a hot dog and a chicken leg put in front of me for breakfast,,yes id like a stack of pancakes with a few fried eggs with maple syrup, and hash browns like from humptys in calgary, anybody ? , !

I lived in America for most of my life, over 60 years, in total. As you said, imaneggspurt, hot dogs and chicken legs are certainly not breakfast food. Breakfast does vary, with certain standards in different parts of the country.

The mobility of Americans, and the spread of "chain" restaurants, has made many formerly "regional favorites" more common everywhere now. But, in years past, the southeast, and parts of the midwest, grits were very popular. Sausage gravy and buttermilk biscuits are also popular in those areas. Neither was seen much in my home area, the northeast.

But, as a general rule, bacon/ham/sausauge and eggs, omelets, pancakes, and waffles were the most common items everywhere; with cereal as the "quick breakfast" that most American children grew up on. For Americans, the inclusion of beans is strange. That's lunch or dinner food in the USA.

It's all food, of course; and we all tend to enjoy what we were raised on.

I should add, by the way, that Chonlada does not serve "hot dogs and chicken legs" as part of their American breakfast. It's eggs, bacon, ham, sausage (though not "American" breakfast sausage), with toast, coffee, and orange juice. That is, in fact, the most common American breakfast.

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But, in years past, the southeast, and parts of the midwest, grits were very popular.

Grits are strickly a southern specialty, you won't find them anywhere in the midwest except maybe in a soul food restaurant.

I lived in Kokomo, Indiana for over a year. Most of the restaurants in that part of Indiana had grits on the menu; and I frequently enjoyed them with my breakfast, once I, a Bostonian, discovered how well they go with eggs.

Also, national chains, such as "Denny's" offer grits on their menus now. They were available at several restaurants in the So Cal area, where I lived for most of the last 30 years before my retirement. As I said, mobility has spread many of the former regional specialties to other areas of the country.

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Slightly off topic, but does anyone know how the ubiquitous American Fried Rice came into being? Is there anything American about it?

A very good question, Jimmy. I have NEVER seen that combination of a chicken leg, hot dog, and fried rice with an egg on top, served in any American restaurant in the States I've lived in: Massachusetts, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, Indiana, Illinois, and California; nor in any of several other States that I've visited.

I, too, am curious as to where the concept of the "American Fried Rice" served here came from. Not that it's bad food. It just brings a smile to my face every time I see it on a menu, since it is decidely NOT an American menu item.

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There is indeed American style Chinese fried rice in America but it is not the same as American fried rice in Thailand. I am guessing they think hot dogs makes it American. You won't find that garbage in America, on the fried rice anyway. There is such a thing as American style Chinese food: American chow mein, chop suey (invented in America), American style egg foo young, etc.

These things go both ways. Visit a typical Thai resto in the US catering to non-Thais and most tables will have Thai iced tea on it (the spiced tea with condensed milk that has 1000 calories). Now of course you can get this drink in Thailand at some places (mainly special stalls), but how often do you see it on the tables of Thais eating at Thai restaurants here? Rarely.

Edited by Jingthing
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But, in years past, the southeast, and parts of the midwest, grits were very popular.

Grits are strickly a southern specialty, you won't find them anywhere in the midwest except maybe in a soul food restaurant.

I lived in Kokomo, Indiana for over a year. Most of the restaurants in that part of Indiana had grits on the menu; and I frequently enjoyed them with my breakfast, once I, a Bostonian, discovered how well they go with eggs.

Also, national chains, such as "Denny's" offer grits on their menus now. They were available at several restaurants in the So Cal area, where I lived for most of the last 30 years before my retirement. As I said, mobility has spread many of the former regional specialties to other areas of the country.

Perhaps you're right and I'm dating myself. I grew up not far outside Chicago and had never heard of anyone serving grits or had ever tasted them until I moved to Austin, Texas in my late teens. I haven't lived in the midwest for decades now (although I do visit fairly often) and realise thngs have changed a lot in recent years. Reading the Mexican food threads shows me that many people still don't realise that there are as many Mexicans in the midwest now as there are in a lot of places in the southwest.

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Villa Food Counter for a cheap, fast and good American breakfast.

Tell them I sent you and you won't get a discount.

I don't go to Villa often, due to the high prices in the market. But I have eaten at that counter a couple of times, and I find their entire menu a good value, with clean, quality food. In fact, it's a bit above the almost equally good value and menu at counter at Foodland (Took Dee?) in every regard. If I were a single guy, living near either of them, I'd be a regular customer.

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