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Eroded Pattaya Beach gets reconstructive surgery


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Eroded Pattaya Beach gets reconstructive surgery

By PRATCH RUJIVANAROM 
THE NATION 
PATTAYA 

 

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A section of Pattaya Beach is now undergoing reconstruction in a Marine Department project in which the highly eroded beach will be refilled with fresh sea-bottom sand.

 

Pattaya Beach is undergoing reconstruction to return the severely eroded beach to its former beauty and attract more tourists.

 

More than 360,000 cubic metres of sand are currently being dredged from the sea bottom and will be added to Pattaya Beach, in a Marine Department project designed to both improve the beach and mitigate coastal erosion.

 

In only three decades, erosion has transformed the once long and beautiful beach into a thin strip of sand between the sea and the seaside road.

 

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The project driver is researcher Thanawat Jarupongsakul from Chulalongkorn University’s Department of Geology. The sustainability of the newly created beach is an issue, he conceded in an interview yesterday with The Nation, as are the financial costs and environmental impacts of the project. Still, Pattaya Beach is being reconstructed in a way that avoids major impacts to the marine environment, Thanawat said, adding the project will create far more financial benefits from tourism than will be spent on the effort.

 

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The project aims to restore sand along the entire 2.7-kilometre beach, and widen it from 3.4 metres pre-reconstruction to its original 35-metre width. The move will reclaim up to 59 rai (9.4 hectares) from the sea on a budget of Bt420 million, said Thanawat.

 

“We will refill the beach by dredging the sand from its source on the sea floor, which is around 20 kilometres away from Pattaya Bay, near Koh Rang Kwain Island,” he said. 

 

“We chose the sand from this source not only because the quality, colour, and size of sand grains here are similar to the sand on Pattaya Beach, but also because there are more than 3 million cubic metres of sand from this site for future usage.”

 

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Before the new sand is moved onto the beach, large sandbags will be buried in the ground to form a foundation and barrier against the eroding tide, he explained. That way, the new sand will not be easily washed away by wave action. During the reconstruction phase itself, a sediment curtain will be placed in the sea to prevent environmental impacts to the marine ecosystem.

 

The project cannot permanently prevent coastal erosion, he conceded, and he expects the new beach will erode by up to 10 metres during its first year. The major cause of beach erosion is the changing ocean tide, Thanawat said, but he was sure that after three years the erosion rate will decline and the remaining beach will be stabilised.

 

“I admit that this project is not totally free from environmental impacts and is more expensive than other coastal erosion prevention techniques,” he said, “but this method will provide a larger profit than what we have invested. I expect that Pattaya Beach’s beautification will boost the tourism business, bring 1.7 million more tourists to Pattaya and generate many jobs and incomes for the local people.”

 

Thanawat’s approach draws praise from Chot Trachu, an adviser to the National Strategy Committee on Environmentally Friendly Development. This project is different from other sand refilling projects, said Chot, as it was properly studied before the project implementation.

 

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Chot is looking forward to seeing the final outcome when the project is completed this November.

 

“I see that this is the most appropriate coastal protection project compared to a defensive seawall made from concrete structures, which does more harm to the beach than good,” said Chot. “But I also want to suggest that there should be regular monitoring of the beach after the project completion to detect any adverse impacts and mitigate them.”

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30352743

 
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"...In only three decades, erosion has transformed the once long and beautiful beach into a thin strip of sand between the sea and the seaside road....

...The project driver is researcher Thanawat Jarupongsakul from Chulalongkorn University’s Department of Geology. The sustainability of the newly created beach is an issue, he conceded in an interview yesterday with The Nation, as are the financial costs and environmental impacts of the project. Still, Pattaya Beach is being reconstructed in a way that avoids major impacts to the marine environment, Thanawat said, adding the project will create far more financial benefits from tourism than will be spent on the effort...."

 

You are fighting a battle with Mother Nature, and my money, were I a betting man, would be on Mother Nature. Once you start messing with the natural functioning of a beach, you can never stop; this will be a huge outlay of money for no real return until such a time as the government gives up.

 

Anyone know the Thai word for "expensive boondoggle"?

 

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Currents change in the years, so this can happen, even in the past it was such a nice beach, that's no guaranty for the future.

Don't forget to make breakwaters otherwise the sand will be gone in no time and if your engineers don't know what they are then they can go to University again. In "my world" every child learned about it in school and what the use of it is. (The Netherlands)

 

 

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Beach reclamation?? This is simply a cash cow that continually operates.

Just throwing good money after bad all the time and achieving nothing but inflated bank accounts of authorities and suppliers.

 

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Simply AMAZING..... it was only weeks ago they were all patting themselves on the back what a wonderful job they had done with then new sand / beach etc..... then it all started to wash away...... now they are doing it all over again and patting themselves on the back...... they have never heard of doing things RIGHT the first time and i wonder why that is???  you don't need to be a rocket scientist to work that out, do you?

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

and widen it from 3.4 metres pre-reconstruction to its original 35-metre width.

 

3 hours ago, webfact said:

The project cannot permanently prevent coastal erosion, he conceded, and he expects the new beach will erode by up to 10 metres during its first year.

So they will lose nearly a third of it after only 12 months........

 

3 hours ago, webfact said:

but he was sure that after three years the erosion rate will decline and the remaining beach will be stabilised.

Does this mean they will be back to 3.4 metres after 3 years and will have to start again.........

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What about the raw sewage just off the beach!!  Why worry about the sand when the sea is so toxic?

Simply pave over it and build a nice, wide promenade for the whores and ladyboys to operate from!

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2 hours ago, NCC1701A said:

the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different out come.

 

unless you own the company that supplies the sand.

There are already plans for a brochure and posters in order to clearly illustrate the principle behind the grandiose work for Somchai and Somjit:

9f382bb0-0956-4772-b025-9cbb13641112_zps 

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

Thanawat’s approach draws praise from Chot Trachu, an adviser to the National Strategy Committee on Environmentally Friendly Development. This project is different from other sand refilling projects, said Chot,

... "What makes this project different from previous ones is that we will add concrete to sand this time and make it a permanent robust beach capable to endure even the super typhoons" he added.

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

In only three decades, erosion has transformed the once long and beautiful beach into a thin strip of sand between the sea and the seaside road

the same three decades not only eroded the beach but also eroded the fun, the quality and the personalities of the bar girls

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38 minutes ago, pattayadude said:

the same three decades not only eroded the beach but also eroded the fun, the quality and the personalities of the bar girls

And of course their silver-haired patrons have faired so much better these past 30-odd years?

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49 minutes ago, pattayadude said:

... "What makes this project different from previous ones is that we will add concrete to sand this time and make it a permanent robust beach capable to endure even the super typhoons" he added.

Paint it green and it will look just like grass as well.

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

Pattaya Beach is undergoing reconstruction to return the severely eroded beach to its former beauty and attract more tourists.

And the sea will remain full of trash as in the last 10-15 years. 

 

Yuk, the sea water was so dirty, I didn't dare to swim there any more for the last 2-3 years.

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The reason for not putting in BREAKWATERS is that the hundreds of boats that ply customers from the beach to the outer islands cannot get to the BEACH to pick up customers. What are the PIERS for?

Keep the smaller boats from pulling up on the beach, otherwise forget the beach reclamation.

 

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

The major cause of beach erosion is the changing ocean tide, Thanawat said, but 

Whoa this guy is cute .. Sounds like he really knows his stuff .. Thank Buddha they've finally got a pro' in .. 

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     Move along. Nothing to see here.  Beach replenishment is something that beach communities in the US do routinely, as needed.  The beach is their most important asset so, naturally, they want to protect it.   No beach, no summer tourists and their tourist dollars.  Yes, it costs money but the economic benefits far outweigh the costs.  

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5 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

"...In only three decades, erosion has transformed the once long and beautiful beach into a thin strip of sand between the sea and the seaside road....

...The project driver is researcher Thanawat Jarupongsakul from Chulalongkorn University’s Department of Geology. The sustainability of the newly created beach is an issue, he conceded in an interview yesterday with The Nation, as are the financial costs and environmental impacts of the project. Still, Pattaya Beach is being reconstructed in a way that avoids major impacts to the marine environment, Thanawat said, adding the project will create far more financial benefits from tourism than will be spent on the effort...."

 

You are fighting a battle with Mother Nature, and my money, were I a betting man, would be on Mother Nature. Once you start messing with the natural functioning of a beach, you can never stop; this will be a huge outlay of money for no real return until such a time as the government gives up.

 

Anyone know the Thai word for "expensive boondoggle"?

 

Sometimes man cannot give up battling erosion of coastlines.

Beaches and dunes are a defense against the sea, and sometimes that fight can't be stopped.

The Netherlands, partly below sea level know this very well, and will not stop fighting.

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

Chot is looking forward to seeing the final outcome when the project is completed this November.

Thana's coming out with all the convincing stuff then Chot pisses on his fireworks by turning it back into fairy tale .. 

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5 hours ago, RotMahKid said:

In "my world" every child learned about it in school and what the use of it is. (The Netherlands)

Or maybe, considering global warming, some dikes?

 

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Seems simple to me; they know where the run-off (rivers really) that carries off the sand happens every time we get heavy rain.  Just put in a wide concrete channel at those points, with wooden footbridges over it.  Let the water go where it wants to, in the end nature will win anyway.

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had those bags been ''biodegradable'' and dissolve over time, this may have been a good idea..but after our first flood the top 12 inch layer of sand covering the bags may wash away leaving an uglier mess ( a sand bag beach),and almost impossible to redo...we will see

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