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Thailand To Devise Aviation Safety Master Plan


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Thailand To Devise Safety Master Plan

by William Dennis

 

4583064192_5646bdb37d_b.jpg

A Thai Airways Boeing 777-200 takes off from Tokyo Narita International Airport. (Photo: Flickr: Creative Commons (BY) by lkarasawa)

 

As part of its effort to meet international safety standards, the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has embarked on a Safety Master Plan (SMP) to review and revise regulations and procedures. According to the director general of CAAT, Chula Sukmanop, the authority will finish its work by 2022.

 

Chula said the new SMP will feature key performance indexes that Thai-registered airlines and all local aviation authorities will have to meet.

 

“When implemented, the authorities concerned would be compelled to inform CAAT of any oversight they make or face the consequences,” Chula pointed out.

 

Full story: https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/air-transport/2018-10-15/thailand-devise-safety-master-plan

 

-- AINonline 2018-10-16

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30 minutes ago, webfact said:

Thailand To Devise Safety Master Plan

Thailand "To" do this or that. Always what they will do. Never what they have successfully done. Boring 

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How many local airlines have been flying in and out of Thailand for how long and they're about to devise a safety plan? Onward and upward!

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1 hour ago, webfact said:

the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has embarked on a Safety Master Plan

'safety' and 'master plan' and 'thailand' do not go together in the same sentence

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1 minute ago, YetAnother said:

'safety' and 'master plan' and 'thailand' do not go together in the same sentence

Yep.

Not buying it.

 

Just officialdom babble to keep us distracted.

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Perhaps some are mystified by my remark above.....

BANGKOK: -- Supernatural powers are cited as the factors behind recent high-profile accidents in Thailand, namely the botched landing of a Thai Airways plane at Bangkok′s main airport earlier this week.

14 people were injured during the evacuation from the Airbus A330-300 which skid off the runway of Suvarnabhumi Airport on 9 September.

While initial investigation pointed to a malfunctioned landing gear (the officials have not yet finished their inquiry), the Managing Director of Thai Airways, Mr. Sorajak Kasemsuvan, is not taking chances. He said his company will conduct a major ceremony to appease the malevolent spirits said to be haunting the airport.

He is quoted as saying that the ceremony will also thank the said spirits for assisting with the successful operation to salvage the plane from the runway.

Mr. Sorajak′s comment followed a series of coverage by Thai Rath, the best-selling newspaper in Thailand, which gave extensive attention to the supposed involvement of ghosts and spirits in the accident.

Previously, Thai Rath has reported that a ghost in "traditional costume" (which strangely resembles the outfit Thai Airways flight attendants wear) has helped evacuate the passengers from the aircraft shortly after it slid off the runway.

The newspaper has also quoted Mr. Chotisak Asapaviriya, a former director of Airports Authority of Thailand (AOT), as saying that he had organised a regular prayer session to placate the vengeful spirits which reside in the airport vicinity.

At the ceremony to unveil the airport in 2006, Mr. Chotisak told Thai Rath, an official in charge of searching for explosive materials had broken down into a trance, claiming that he was being possessed by a "grandfather ghost" who demanded a shrine to be built on the airport compound. The shrine was quickly built afterwards.

Thai Rath helpfully points out that 8 major shrines have been built around Suvarnabhumi Airport by the staff in order to ward off evil spirits, such as a shrine dedicated to the Naga (holy big snake in Buddhist myths) which is presumably angered by construction of the airport on what was once a swamp inhabited by snakes.

Other smaller shrines include a strangely named "Italian Shrine".

The newspaper cited the curses of the residing ghosts as the main reason the construction of the airport had been delayed for decades. The more rational Thais, however, would point to mire of corruption that has plagued the project before the government of Thaksin Shinawatra finalised the project in late 2005

Dr. Smith Thammasaroj, former director of Suvarnabhumi Airport, told Thai Rath he was convinced of the existence of supernatural entities around the airport even though, he admitted, he had never encountered any particular case personally.

The scientist who once headed Thailand′s Meteorological Department said he had invited so many psychics to conduct ceremonies and constructed so many shrines "that I can′t keep count".

"We even had to build a condominium for the ghosts to reside," Dr. Smith said, "Because the spirits are so many individual spirit houses won′t be enough".

However, there has been few secular responses to the accident at Suvarnabhumi Airport on 9 September, too. Sqn.Ldr. Sitha Tiwaree, Managing Director AOT, said the authority has conducted an Emergency Plan Rehearsal, in which the airport′s fire and rescue departments took part.

The accident involving the Airbus was the most severe case at the airport since its opening 7 years ago, he said.

Sqn.Ldr. Sitha stressed that the incident will be analysed for future adjustment of the Emergency Plan, particularly how to transport passengers to the airport building - the procedure that received several complaints on 9 September. The rehearsal also pointed out that the airline crew was not familiar with the runway, causing complications during the latest accident, the director noted.

In long term, he said, the airport plans to build another substitute runway, in order to sustain further service. The AOT board will meet on Tuesday, 17 September to discuss about the construction budget, according to Sqn.Ldr. Sitha.

But it seems the spirits do not only roam the sky. After a train headed from Malaysia to Bangkok′s Hua Lamphong Station derailed in the capital city yesterday, Daily News, the second best-selling newspaper of the kingdom, reported that a certain curse might be involved.

According to Daily News, a painting at Hua Lamphong depicted a small obstacle in the rail track, which perfectly explains the frequent derailments - more than 15 incidents this year alone.

Even Transport Minister Chatchart Sitthipan, best known for his hands-on approach in inspecting problems of public transports, is mulling a paranormal hands-on solution. He has reportedly ordered the Deputy Permanent Secretary of the Ministry to consider a plan to organise a merit-making ceremony for the sake of his Ministry.

During the past few months, Mr. Chatchart noted, the country has suffered from many transport accidents such as minivan crashes, train derailments, boat crashes, and the Thai Airways incident.

"There have been more deaths than usual. Many have suggested that the Ministry of Transport needs a large-scale merit-making ceremony" Mr. Chatchart said.

 

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Thai pilots attempting to do hand brake turns on the runway should be considered as not advisory in this  Safety Master Plan in light of the recent plane skidding off the runway.  🤣

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

According to the director general of CAAT, Chula Sukmanop, the authority will finish its work by 2022.

So, we still have to wait another 4 years for the "Hub of Master Plans" to become operational.

 

i don't understand why it's going to take 4 years to "review and revise regulations and procedures", they could do it in their lunch hours before Christmas; there can't be that many to review.

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

According to the director general of CAAT, Chula Sukmanop, the authority will finish its work by 2022.

Well, there is a nice little sinecure for a group of hi-so morons for the next 4 years. Why do they just not follow the well established rules and systems of operation already in place around the rest of the world..... 

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There must be a reason for this sudden interest in safety.

 

And, here it is hidden further down in the original article. Another downgrade must be due soon.......

 

Quote

According to ICAO’s latest audit list, Thailand ranks below the global average in all eight effective implementation categories.

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Trentham said:

Perhaps some are mystified by my remark above.....

BANGKOK: -- Supernatural powers are cited as the factors behind recent high-profile accidents in Thailand, namely the botched landing of a Thai Airways plane at Bangkok′s main airport earlier this week. ..................................................

 

 

I couldn't believe it so I had to search online. Absolutely unreal.

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1 hour ago, AhFarangJa said:

Well, there is a nice little sinecure for a group of hi-so morons for the next 4 years. Why do they just not follow the well established rules and systems of operation already in place around the rest of the world..... 

You not un-DER-sa-tan Thailand. Thailand not same you country na. Thailand velly complexity na. 

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2 hours ago, Trentham said:

Perhaps some are mystified by my remark above.....

BANGKOK: -- Supernatural powers are cited as the factors behind recent high-profile accidents in Thailand, namely the botched landing of a Thai Airways plane at Bangkok′s main airport earlier this week.

14 people were injured during the evacuation from the Airbus A330-300 which skid off the runway of Suvarnabhumi Airport on 9 September.

While initial investigation pointed to a malfunctioned landing gear (the officials have not yet finished their inquiry), the Managing Director of Thai Airways, Mr. Sorajak Kasemsuvan, is not taking chances. He said his company will conduct a major ceremony to appease the malevolent spirits said to be haunting the airport.

He is quoted as saying that the ceremony will also thank the said spirits for assisting with the successful operation to salvage the plane from the runway.

Mr. Sorajak′s comment followed a series of coverage by Thai Rath, the best-selling newspaper in Thailand, which gave extensive attention to the supposed involvement of ghosts and spirits in the accident.

Previously, Thai Rath has reported that a ghost in "traditional costume" (which strangely resembles the outfit Thai Airways flight attendants wear) has helped evacuate the passengers from the aircraft shortly after it slid off the runway.

The newspaper has also quoted Mr. Chotisak Asapaviriya, a former director of Airports Authority of Thailand (AOT), as saying that he had organised a regular prayer session to placate the vengeful spirits which reside in the airport vicinity.

At the ceremony to unveil the airport in 2006, Mr. Chotisak told Thai Rath, an official in charge of searching for explosive materials had broken down into a trance, claiming that he was being possessed by a "grandfather ghost" who demanded a shrine to be built on the airport compound. The shrine was quickly built afterwards.

Thai Rath helpfully points out that 8 major shrines have been built around Suvarnabhumi Airport by the staff in order to ward off evil spirits, such as a shrine dedicated to the Naga (holy big snake in Buddhist myths) which is presumably angered by construction of the airport on what was once a swamp inhabited by snakes.

Other smaller shrines include a strangely named "Italian Shrine".

The newspaper cited the curses of the residing ghosts as the main reason the construction of the airport had been delayed for decades. The more rational Thais, however, would point to mire of corruption that has plagued the project before the government of Thaksin Shinawatra finalised the project in late 2005

Dr. Smith Thammasaroj, former director of Suvarnabhumi Airport, told Thai Rath he was convinced of the existence of supernatural entities around the airport even though, he admitted, he had never encountered any particular case personally.

The scientist who once headed Thailand′s Meteorological Department said he had invited so many psychics to conduct ceremonies and constructed so many shrines "that I can′t keep count".

"We even had to build a condominium for the ghosts to reside," Dr. Smith said, "Because the spirits are so many individual spirit houses won′t be enough".

However, there has been few secular responses to the accident at Suvarnabhumi Airport on 9 September, too. Sqn.Ldr. Sitha Tiwaree, Managing Director AOT, said the authority has conducted an Emergency Plan Rehearsal, in which the airport′s fire and rescue departments took part.

The accident involving the Airbus was the most severe case at the airport since its opening 7 years ago, he said.

Sqn.Ldr. Sitha stressed that the incident will be analysed for future adjustment of the Emergency Plan, particularly how to transport passengers to the airport building - the procedure that received several complaints on 9 September. The rehearsal also pointed out that the airline crew was not familiar with the runway, causing complications during the latest accident, the director noted.

In long term, he said, the airport plans to build another substitute runway, in order to sustain further service. The AOT board will meet on Tuesday, 17 September to discuss about the construction budget, according to Sqn.Ldr. Sitha.

But it seems the spirits do not only roam the sky. After a train headed from Malaysia to Bangkok′s Hua Lamphong Station derailed in the capital city yesterday, Daily News, the second best-selling newspaper of the kingdom, reported that a certain curse might be involved.

According to Daily News, a painting at Hua Lamphong depicted a small obstacle in the rail track, which perfectly explains the frequent derailments - more than 15 incidents this year alone.

Even Transport Minister Chatchart Sitthipan, best known for his hands-on approach in inspecting problems of public transports, is mulling a paranormal hands-on solution. He has reportedly ordered the Deputy Permanent Secretary of the Ministry to consider a plan to organise a merit-making ceremony for the sake of his Ministry.

During the past few months, Mr. Chatchart noted, the country has suffered from many transport accidents such as minivan crashes, train derailments, boat crashes, and the Thai Airways incident.

"There have been more deaths than usual. Many have suggested that the Ministry of Transport needs a large-scale merit-making ceremony" Mr. Chatchart said.

 

Instead of A330 insert 747.

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As part of its effort to meet international safety standards, the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has embarked on a Safety Master Plan (SMP) to review and revise regulations and procedures. According to the director general of CAAT, Chula Sukmanop, the authority will finish its work by 2022.

 

My only reaction to this "news" is

O.M.G.

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I speak from personal experience, >50years in sport aviation, 11 of them here in Thailand.

 

The CAAT is very good at promoting safety in aviation. The safest thing an aircraft can do is to not leave the ground. They have devised a complex system of redundant paperwork, duplicated effort, incompetent and unquestioning staff, ignorant bosses and a brain-dead legal department, which ensures that any given light aircraft, or pilot,  is grounded for months at a time. Meanwhile costs spiral upwards, and destinations are closed down.

 

The CAAT is an equal opportunity organisation. Thais suffer as much as farang, and It mostly doesn't matter who you know.

 

The standard of pilot training is in line with the rest of education in LOS - nobody fails.

To achieve a pilots licence in other countries, student pilots must spend a minimum number of hours flying solo, and undertake solo cross-country flights. Here, student pilots are not permitted to fly solo, until after they have received their licences, which might take months. 

Pilots are required to pass exams in theoretical subjects. Elsewhere it is necessary to have some understanding of the subjects under examination, and to demonstrate an ability to apply that understanding. In LOS it is multiple choice rote learning, with not just some of answers being wrong - the questions are wrong too! The philosophy is, they have paid so much for the training, the loss of face of failure would be unacceptable to student and family.

 

The "safety culture" is actually a blame culture. When things go wrong, somebody must be to blame, and will be prosecuted. Blame can not be allocated to senior pilots, instructors, ranking officers, etc., too much face would be lost. So scapegoats are found, no accident is properly investigated, (they don't begin to know how), and nothing is ever learned. Like motor accidents, if a farang is involved, blame will be assigned there.

 

There is an inherent belief that because an "aircraft engineer" has spent years looking up the backsides of Airbusses, he knows everything there is to know about light aircraft - the truth is they know very little, and they don't know how little they know. It is painful to watch the loss of face when they ask a stupid question about, for example, the lack of an oil-pressure guage on a two-stroke aircraft engine.

 

There is a huge repository of knowledge and experience in Thailand, in the form of experienced and well-educated farang pilots, engineers, etc.  It is totally unacceptable ever to ask for, or worse pay for, help and advice from that source.

 

The true truth is that the emperor has no clothes, and everyone can see it - including the emperor!

 

All of which being said, it is at least possible to fly private GA in Thailand. In most of the neighbouring countries it is not!

 

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you lot don't understand how important this is

 

such a change from closing down the last aviation safety department and opening a new one under a different name.

 

of course the pilots of Thailand are not valued highly around the world, most companies will avoid a Thai pilot

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Grusa, you are very much spot on. Particularly the rote learning and standards set to avoid a fail - being pretty much none. Your experience with inappropriate inspectors with no competence in a directly relevant field are (or were) mirrored in airline ops here. I had to laugh when I asked an ‘observer’ onboard, the guy who was going to ok me to fly a multi crew, heavy jet, what his airline experience was. He rather proudly told me he had a private licence! A few years of operating here was quite the eye opener.

 

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

Thailand To Devise Safety Master Plan

"....the authority will finish its work by 2022". No rush, that should see out plenty of buffet lunches and heaps of first class international travel junkets (as non-paying passengers).

After they wrap that up in 2022 they might start to think about doing a Financial Safety Plan to save the life and future of Thai Airways.......if there is to be any future.  

Last year Thai Airways lost 2.11 billion baht ($67.41 million) for its 2017 fiscal year blaming aircraft maintenance and higher fuel prices. Big opportunities here for future savings by reducing aircraft maintenance and using less fuel on take-off. 

It was also reported that Thai Airways faces future challenges due to increased competition and a shortage of trained pilots, engineers, technicians and flight attendants. No problems there, just recruit them on lower salaries as soon as they come straight out of training school. 

So far as recent landing accidents Thai Airways might consider safety net and hook landings for their aircraft; just to be on the safe side. 

 

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