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Airline Requirements with Regard to Vaccinations


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1 hour ago, internationalism said:

I think all internation planes from thailand need pcr test.

Vax is about entry to another country - without one quarantine is likely.

Some countries do allow entry just with pcr, atk, as well as antibody test positive within 90 days and proof of covid within 180 days

Include requirements can change quickly!

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3 hours ago, Jeffr2 said:

Getting vaccinated is the easiest way to deal with this.

Granted, but not if got AZ and need to travel today or tomorrow or 2 months on. Wait time is 3 months for shot #2 with AZ. 

 

How 'bout sticking to answering the OP query and ditch the virtue signaling. :post-4641-1156693976:

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2 hours ago, Skeptic7 said:

Granted, but not if got AZ and need to travel today or tomorrow or 2 months on. Wait time is 3 months for shot #2 with AZ. 

 

How 'bout sticking to answering the OP query and ditch the virtue signaling. :post-4641-1156693976:

Most of my foreign friends are fully vaccinated in Thailand. AZ and Pfizer.

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We are in the middle of a holiday right now.

Lion air flights from don muang to hat yai require vaccination certificate and it was checked before boarding.

 

Later, while  traveling from hat yai to pak bara ( the port for onward boat trip to koh lipe), we were stopped twice at police check points but they only asked about certificate but didnt actually inspect after we said we had one.

 

The best suggestion i can make is that it is very likely you will need one and therefore don't travel without one, especially to areas in red zones.

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friends have recently visited various european countries for holidays, all report cursory, at best, checking of vaccination documentation. going forward unless there is an internationally accepted standard, that cant be copied(!) how much value is there? and anyway these checks will soon be nothing more than the shining a torch into handbags checks at mall entrances

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1 minute ago, it is what it is said:

 

friends have recently visited various european countries for holidays, all report cursory, at best, checking of vaccination documentation. going forward unless there is an internationally accepted standard, that cant be copied(!) how much value is there? and anyway these checks will soon be nothing more than the shining a torch into handbags checks at mall entrances

I've been in Europe for several months now. Had our certificates checked many times. Many. And none were cursory. None.

 

Since we didn't have the digital EU certificate, we actually had to pay for tests before getting on a regional flight. Cost a bunch and took quite a bit of our time.

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13 minutes ago, ChrisKC said:

We are in the middle of a holiday right now.

Lion air flights from don muang to hat yai require vaccination certificate and it was checked before boarding.

 

Later, while  traveling from hat yai to pak bara ( the port for onward boat trip to koh lipe), we were stopped twice at police check points but they only asked about certificate but didnt actually inspect after we said we had one.

 

The best suggestion i can make is that it is very likely you will need one and therefore don't travel without one, especially to areas in red zones.

Our friends recently traveled from chonburi to Burnham. Because they were not fully vaccinated, they had to quarantine at home. With daily checks by health officials.

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Domestic airlines: it depends on the color of the origin/arrival. For example, CM to BKK doesn't require being vaccinated or tested. Return, it does.

 

International: check the airline AND the arrival country.

 

Moving around in Europe: from 1st October I believe that a Green Pass is required in many countries to board a plane, a train, dine indoors, visit a museum (or test, test, test, expensive). If double vaccinated in Thailand, a European Green Pass can be obtained even before leaving Thailand.

 

AZ interval in Thailand: used to be 12 weeks, the standard is now 10. And Pfizer is relatively common too by now for expats, 3 weeks.

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Let me add my 2 Cents about Singapore Airlines and Changi Airport for Transit passengers:

 

1.  Transited in February from LAX to BKK.  All transit passengers had to stay inside a secured part of the terminal called the "THA", Transit Holding Area.  It was like a quasi jail.  Bathroom, chairs, tables, vending machines and wifi.  Spent 7 hours in it and it was bad.  It was rather crowded as well. Paid $5 dollars for a Cup O Noodle.  Passengers were then marched in a single file line to the connecting gate.  

 

2. Emailed SIA yesterday about transit in 2022 and this is what I got

 

   a) RT-PCR test within 48 hours of departure and vaccination status is irrelevant

        72 hours before departure is not difficult but 48 hours would be tight.

   b) The THA holding facility for transit passengers is still in place

 

Well no thank you SIA and I will fly with ANA or JAL.  The Japanese Airlines follow the RT-PCR testing policies of your destination country and transit passengers can roam the terminal and eat, drink or shop.  I transited in both Narita and Haneda this year and both were fine with the exception of both airports being rather empty.  

 

 

Edited by sqwakvfr
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7 hours ago, Jeffr2 said:

I've been in Europe for several months now. Had our certificates checked many times. Many. And none were cursory. None.

 

Since we didn't have the digital EU certificate, we actually had to pay for tests before getting on a regional flight. Cost a bunch and took quite a bit of our time.

When I left France for Thailand it was super heavy but you didn't need to be vaccinated. I was but, it was all about the pcr less than 72 hrs. But that was 1st July. Now it's changed but for myself I have the vaccinated passport on my phone. When I left bkk for Chiang Mai. Heavy checks but I was fine with 2 shots and fresh out of quarantine. Now I heard they are making it much harder, but as always probably depends on the airline. 

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thanks for that info hoping like heel to get back to LOS next May,To Chiang Mai first stop, what is the format for landing at CM, have had my 2 AZ shots. and are hoping to get a buster later,I'm Australia, but if all goes to plan Taiwan first.only 3 things I want is no quarantine, the bars & market's open. Bring it on. 

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1 hour ago, sqwakvfr said:

Let me add my 2 Cents about Singapore Airlines and Changi Airport for Transit passengers:

 

1.  Transited in February from LAX to BKK.  All transit passengers had to stay inside a secured part of the terminal called the "THA", Transit Holding Area.  It was like a quasi jail.  Bathroom, chairs, tables, vending machines and wifi.  Spent 7 hours in it and it was bad.  It was rather crowded as well. Paid $5 dollars for a Cup O Noodle.  Passengers were then marched in a single file line to the connecting gate.  

 

2. Emailed SIA yesterday about transit in 2022 and this is what I got

 

   a) RT-PCR test within 48 hours of departure and vaccination status is irrelevant

        72 hours before departure is not difficult but 48 hours would be tight.

   b) The THA holding facility for transit passengers is still in place

 

Well no thank you SIA and I will fly with ANA or JAL.  The Japanese Airlines follow the RT-PCR testing policies of your destination country and transit passengers can roam the terminal and eat, drink or shop.  I transited in both Narita and Haneda this year and both were fine with the exception of both airports being rather empty.  

 

 

I searched for comments re Changi because I have an SQ booking with Changi transit in early December. I found other reports/comments that the Changi Airport Transit Holding Area is well set up, quite comfortable, regular polite checks if transit passengers had any needs/concerns. Drinks / some food available at reasonable cost, all handled no contact.

Checking/processing of documents handled professionally, friendly, any questions well answered.

 

One comment mentioned that a transit passenger asked if he could better details/clarification about regulations/process at his final destination (not mentioned). Immediate response 'we will check and get back to you, about 10 minutes' this happened with good valuable printed details, and very professional, caring friendly conversations and attitudes. 

 

Walk to the next flight departure was single file but with help if needed, nothing unpleasant/nothing unfriendly.

 

One comment mentioned one transit person in a wheelchair with an attendant, who was waiting (with SQ w/chair) at aircraft door in total ppe, head in a totally enclosed full helmet, wheeled the passenger a small distance away from the aircraft, stopped and politely asked the passenger if he had any special needs, and stayed with the passenger until seated in the next aircraft.

 

Bottom line, vast majority of comments indicated that passengers transiting in Singapore were satisfied/impressed at the professionalism and the caring attitude. 

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Scoreboard, my Changi experience was way different.  I will add food can be ordered via an app and delivered to the THA .  I was hungry but not willing to pay $20 for a cheeseburger.  Also, I spent 7 hours in the THA.  My experiences transiting with Korean Air at Incheon and with JAL at both Narita and Haneda were much better  As expected at Narita I was able to buy a Asahi and leisurely drink it while sitting in the terminal.  I have been a member of the Kris Flyer for almost a decade and the glory days of Singapore Airlines for me is in the rearview mirror.  If you fly with SIA I hope your flight and transit experience is better than my experience.  

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7 hours ago, arithai12 said:

 

Domestic airlines: it depends on the color of the origin/arrival. For example, CM to BKK doesn't require being vaccinated or tested. Return, it does.

 

International: check the airline AND the arrival country.

 

Moving around in Europe: from 1st October I believe that a Green Pass is required in many countries to board a plane, a train, dine indoors, visit a museum (or test, test, test, expensive). If double vaccinated in Thailand, a European Green Pass can be obtained even before leaving Thailand.

 

AZ interval in Thailand: used to be 12 weeks, the standard is now 10. And Pfizer is relatively common too by now for expats, 3 weeks.

my consulate wrote to me, that it's not possible to convert thai vax certificate to green pass or even certify authenticity of my thai vax by consulate. They said they don't have anything to do with thai jabs.

I have tried to trace requirements for some countries in europe - switzerland, belgium, austria do allow entry without obligatory isolation 5 days, if transiting for 48-96h. They would accept for entry pcr, positive antibody 90 days, certificate of covid 180 days.

I have registered for Johnson in my home country, because it's 1 shot it would allow me to travel easily the next time. But I can't enter without isolation.

Please post a link to some details 

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There seems to be an issue with some airlines flying to Europe apparently requiring a PCR test here in Bangkok before departure whereas for many EU countries the government rules clearly state that either a PCR OR an antigen test is required. Though the latter must usually be taken closer to departure it is more convenient (and cheaper) as you can have it done within an hour and walk away with a certificate whereas the results of the PCR test take time (and are usually forwarded by e-mail). If you want to have results in a few hours there are a few options (but sometimes at a highly inflated cost).

As examples, the official govt. site for the Netherlands and Germany state:

  • Netherlands: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/mandatory-negative-test-results-and-declaration/information-on-the-test-result     
  • Type of test: 
    • The test used for a NAAT (PCR) test result  must be a molecular NAAT (PCR) test (either PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT). For a rapid test result the test must be a rapid test conducted up to 24 hours before departure. Usually this is an antigen test but it can also be a NAAT (PCR) test.
  •  
  • Germanyhttps://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268
  • A negative test result obtained using nucleic acid amplification technology (e.g. PCR, PoC- PCR) in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. The test must have been carried out no more than 72 hours prior to entry (time of swabbing).

    Alternatively, a negative antigen rapid test result in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. Following a stay in a high-risk area, the test must have been carried out no more than 48 hours prior to entry. Following a stay in an area of variant of concern, the test must have been carried out no more than 24 hours prior to entry

Moving to the KLM site, for a BKK-AMS flight it says (https://klm.traveldoc.aero/results):

Covid-19 Test Required: Passengers aged 12 years and older travelling from a high-risk or very high-risk area outside the EU/Schengen area must hold one of the following:

  • A negative NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA and mPOCT) result conducted up to 48 hours before boarding; or
  • A negative antigen test result conducted up to 24 hours before boarding.

 

So a PCR test is not always required, but check first with your airline.

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5 hours ago, Dazauz said:

When I left France for Thailand it was super heavy but you didn't need to be vaccinated. I was but, it was all about the pcr less than 72 hrs. But that was 1st July. Now it's changed but for myself I have the vaccinated passport on my phone. When I left bkk for Chiang Mai. Heavy checks but I was fine with 2 shots and fresh out of quarantine. Now I heard they are making it much harder, but as always probably depends on the airline. 

When I flew to Portugal, no PCR test if you were fully vaccinated. Now, a test is required.

 

Things change rapidly now!

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14 hours ago, Harveyg said:

If I have a double Pfizer from the US, written in English, with a CDC logo, will it be acceptable for all purposes in Thailand? Sorry for the slightly off-topic question.

If you make a photocopy of it, alongside your driver license or passport and then laminate it, this is useful for checkpoints (especially in the rain) where your original CDC card (which you wouldn't laminate since you might add booster shots to it) might be dropped or damaged. 

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15 hours ago, Heng said:

 

On 10/7/2021 at 10:11 AM, Harveyg said:

If I have a double Pfizer from the US, written in English, with a CDC logo, will it be acceptable for all purposes in Thailand? Sorry for the slightly off-topic question.

Expand  

If you make a photocopy of it, alongside your driver license or passport and then laminate it, this is useful for checkpoints (especially in the rain) where your original CDC card (which you wouldn't laminate since you might add booster shots to it) might be dropped or damaged. 

 

Thanks for the useful tips.  

One more question: ithere does not seem to be an app in the US that contains all peoples’ data and I don’t think if I show my Covid card in Thailand that they will not be able to verify it with the US database right?
I’m wondering if they might reject me because I don’t have the Thai app and therefore they can’t verify me if they want to.  Maybe it will become an issue for a long range visa which I plan on getting?

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19 hours ago, cormanr7 said:

There seems to be an issue with some airlines flying to Europe apparently requiring a PCR test here in Bangkok before departure whereas for many EU countries the government rules clearly state that either a PCR OR an antigen test is required. Though the latter must usually be taken closer to departure it is more convenient (and cheaper) as you can have it done within an hour and walk away with a certificate whereas the results of the PCR test take time (and are usually forwarded by e-mail). If you want to have results in a few hours there are a few options (but sometimes at a highly inflated cost).

As examples, the official govt. site for the Netherlands and Germany state:

  • Netherlands: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/mandatory-negative-test-results-and-declaration/information-on-the-test-result     
  • Type of test: 
    • The test used for a NAAT (PCR) test result  must be a molecular NAAT (PCR) test (either PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT). For a rapid test result the test must be a rapid test conducted up to 24 hours before departure. Usually this is an antigen test but it can also be a NAAT (PCR) test.
  •  
  • Germanyhttps://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268
  • A negative test result obtained using nucleic acid amplification technology (e.g. PCR, PoC- PCR) in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. The test must have been carried out no more than 72 hours prior to entry (time of swabbing).

    Alternatively, a negative antigen rapid test result in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish. Following a stay in a high-risk area, the test must have been carried out no more than 48 hours prior to entry. Following a stay in an area of variant of concern, the test must have been carried out no more than 24 hours prior to entry

Moving to the KLM site, for a BKK-AMS flight it says (https://klm.traveldoc.aero/results):

Covid-19 Test Required: Passengers aged 12 years and older travelling from a high-risk or very high-risk area outside the EU/Schengen area must hold one of the following:

  • A negative NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA and mPOCT) result conducted up to 48 hours before boarding; or
  • A negative antigen test result conducted up to 24 hours before boarding.

 

So a PCR test is not always required, but check first with your airline.

"...whereas the results of the PCR test take time (and are usually forwarded by e-mail). If you want to have results in a few hours there are a few options (but sometimes at a highly inflated cost)...."

 

This seems to be coming very common, often at the departure level of major airports.

 

In Sydney, Australia:

 

- Passenger can book in advance or walk-in, lab has full international certification, just 15 minutes drive from Sydney airport. Report by e.mail guaranteed within 4 hours, for higher price AUD300.

Or report next day before 12.00 midday AUD150.  But for this price passengers informed, where applicable, timing of report cannot be guaranteed when there is high workload.

 

Or passenger can walk in to lab situated inside Sydney airport, full international certification, on departure level, 3 - 4 minutes walk to check-in rows. Fee is AUD150, swab takes 1 -2 minutes, client guaranteed to receive report within 1 hour by SMS/e.mail/or printed report.  

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