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I’m 73 years old retiring fro the US to Thailand. With the new rule for 3 million baht inpatient coverage, wondering if anyone has information about insurance that I need to purchase that could cover me both Medicare and Expat while living in Thailand. Thank you.

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There is no rule as of yet. The only requirements are for OA Visa/Extensions: 400/40K baht insurance + 100K USD Covid plan / 1 year or length of permission to stay upon entry

 

for O Visa : 100K USD Covid plan for 90 days / none reuired for subsequent extensions

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49 minutes ago, tonray said:

There is no rule as of yet. The only requirements are for OA Visa/Extensions: 400/40K baht insurance + 100K USD Covid plan / 1 year or length of permission to stay upon entry

I guess you have not read about the new requirements.

At this time it appears to be 3 million baht of medical insurance that also covers treatment up to 3 million baht to apply for a new OA visa.

It will not still be 40/400k baht for a year for extension of stay applications at immigration.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, ubonjoe said:

I guess you have not read about the new requirements.

At this time it appears to be 3 million baht of medical insurance that also covers treatment up to 3 million baht to apply for a new OA visa.

It will not still be 40/400k baht for a year for extension of stay applications at immigration.

 

 

There is a new Royal Thai Police order ? As of yesterday I did not see anything ?

Edited by tonray
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8 minutes ago, tonray said:

Where is the RTP order with the actual law ?

The is no immigration order it since immigration has nothing to do with it at this time. It is only for new OA visa applications at a embassy or official consulate at this time,

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This article in Pattaya Mail https://www.pattayamail.com/latestnews/news/thailand-now-clarifies-aspects-of-its-new-welcome-policy-376620 implies that the only change for O-A visas is that $50,000 Covid insurance is required, in addition to 400,000 / 40.000 baht in-patient / out-patient. Doesn't say if it's for new visas or extensions. Looks like a lot more clarification is required.

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29 minutes ago, tonray said:

Where is the RTP order with the actual law ?

what part of "press releases" don't you understand?  Even some of the Thai approved health insurance companies ( in particular AETNA ) have already been posting ads on ASEAN NOW with regards to these upcoming changes, and my health insurance company has confirmed that they ARE coming.  See 2 links below. 1st by AETNA and the 2nd by the Deputy Health Minister. Just the formalities of publishing in the Govt Gazette to come.

 

How are the Non-Immigrant Visa “O-A” (Long Stay Visa) requirements changing? - Insurance in Thailand - ASEAN NOW - News, Travel & Forum

 

Non-immigrant OA visa applicants required to have ฿3m health insurance - Thai Visas, Residency, and Work Permits - ASEAN NOW - News, Travel & Forum

 

 

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12 hours ago, tonray said:

There is no rule as of yet. The only requirements are for OA Visa/Extensions: 400/40K baht insurance + 100K USD Covid plan / 1 year or length of permission to stay upon entry

 

for O Visa : 100K USD Covid plan for 90 days / none reuired for subsequent extensions

Not in Australia re the OA, the 40/400k is now redundant, replaced by 3 million bht cover inclusive of Covid

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6 hours ago, dlclark97 said:

Not sure I understand what was meant with the mention of Medicare.  Medicare does not provide any medical insurance or coverage of any kind when in Thailand.  

Some Medicare Advantage programs do provide for medical insurance while out of the USA.

The insurance plan I have is administered by Aetna and prior to that it was administered by Blue Cross (which was very good).  I must pay out of pocket and submit a claim to Aetna for reimbursement. Generally they do pay  the claim, but for certain procedures they pay nothing.

 

 

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21 hours ago, wwest5829 said:

Herry1465, I retired to the Kingdom of Thailand in 2011 after applying to the Royal Thai Consulate in Chicago. I completed and submitted the required Police Report, Medical Report and Financial Report demonstrating that I would not be a burden to the Thai citizens and would be a person of good repute. Sadly, I have learned over time that applying for the O-A Visa for reason of Retirement was not the best choice. And so, my recommendation for you is, as an American citizen, enter Thailand "Visa Exempt". You will be given permission for a 30 Day. Before coming continue to read on this forum to watch for any changes to requirements, read advice from UbonJoe and read the Thai government Immigration Police requirements. While I entered on an O-A visa, I am planning to switch to an "O" Visa as soon as the borders open to allow the transition. It is up to you but I have used a reputable agency once here in Thailand as they keep up with any local immigration office requirements (vary from different offices). At age 74 the changing and expensive health insurance requirements leave me paying for policies that will pay nothing due to pre-existing conditions. while I had a heart attack here and can highly recommend the world class care, the rules are such so as to ignore what insurance coverage I have in the US (pays $5000.00 pre year for overseas care) and the fact that I paid my bill balance without incident. Medicare, I continue to pay the monthly premium in case of need to return to the US for catastrophic care. If you are a full military retiree you have global coverage ... if a civilian under Medicare, you get nothing outside US territory.

I am in the same situation as you, next extension is in April of next year, I don't think there is any way that I would be able to afford a three million baht policy, was going to do a border run when all this Covid <deleted> started and just missed out on doing one, My biggest concern about switching visas is at some point I think they will make everyone have insurance. At least I have a little time to think about it. 

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16 hours ago, kokopelli said:

Some Medicare Advantage programs do provide for medical insurance while out of the USA.

The insurance plan I have is administered by Aetna and prior to that it was administered by Blue Cross (which was very good).  I must pay out of pocket and submit a claim to Aetna for reimbursement. Generally they do pay  the claim, but for certain procedures they pay nothing.

 

 

I had an Advantage plan when I moved here in 2016, plan administrator informed me it would not be good after six months out of the US

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11 minutes ago, flexomike said:

I am in the same situation as you, next extension is in April of next year, I don't think there is any way that I would be able to afford a three million baht policy, was going to do a border run when all this Covid <deleted> started and just missed out on doing one, My biggest concern about switching visas is at some point I think they will make everyone have insurance. At least I have a little time to think about it. 

While we cannot exclude the possibility, I do think there are obstacles for Thailand in implementing a blanket coverage. I also give some credence to the idea that we are being caught between a political power struggle.

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16 hours ago, kokopelli said:

Some Medicare Advantage programs do provide for medical insurance while out of the USA.

The insurance plan I have is administered by Aetna and prior to that it was administered by Blue Cross (which was very good).  I must pay out of pocket and submit a claim to Aetna for reimbursement. Generally they do pay  the claim, but for certain procedures they pay nothing.

 

 

My advantage plan with Humana was only good for six months out of country, after that you were on your own

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On 10/22/2021 at 6:16 AM, tonray said:

There is no rule as of yet. The only requirements are for OA Visa/Extensions: 400/40K baht insurance + 100K USD Covid plan / 1 year or length of permission to stay upon entry

 

for O Visa : 100K USD Covid plan for 90 days / none reuired for subsequent extensions

 

20 hours ago, steevjee said:

Not in Australia re the OA, the 40/400k is now redundant, replaced by 3 million bht cover inclusive of Covid

Sure enough...the Thai Embassy in Canberra AU clearing states the new requirements which probably went into effect 1 Oct 2021 for new OA Retirement visas.   And I think I read somewhere for OA Retirement "Extensions" it will go in effect 1 Sep 2022.   Fortunately, none of the other Visa categories like Non O Marriage, Non B for Business, ED for Education,  etc. show the Bt3M requirement.

https://canberra.thaiembassy.org/visa-categories/

 

Below is a partial quote from the Thailand Embassy in Canberra, Australia.   It talks the Bt3M insurance requirement.  And it also talks what is required to use a foreign insurance policy...or use a Bt3M bank deposit in lieu of insurance... or use a combo method of deposit plus insurance policy....but to use the deposit method a person would first need to provide a letter of refusal to insure from a foreign or Thai insurance company.  


The way I read below to use a foreign insurance policy it's still going to be harder than heck in most cases to meet the policy documentation requirements and associated signatures.   While a person with a regular commercial policy might be able to meet the doc/signature requirements in the case of a person with a home country government  coverage/policy like say the U.S. retired military Tricare medical coverage that for all practical purposes has no upper limits and provides worldwide coverage, the approval of such a foreign govt policy would probably be a no-go since there is no policy issued per se, there is no policy cover page/sheet defining limits, etc....instead, it's just govt medical coverage pretty much with no limits....a person just signs up for it...and about the most they get is an unfancy letter they can download saying the are enrolled or maybe get an enrollment card.  I expect most countries which have universal health care type coverage which may provide worldwide coverage would be in the same boat regarding documentation.

 

If the words below appear in the eventual police order that comes out governing OA Retirement "extensions of stay" then once again use of a foreign policy will be extremely hard to impossible to use--and you can bet the Thai insurance companies were instrumental in making it so.

 

Partial Quote for Thailand Embassy in Canberra Australia

https://canberra.thaiembassy.org/non-immigrant-visa-category-o-a-for-retirement-long-stay-valid-for-1-year/

3.5 Health Insurance

  • a certificate of health insurance policy issued by Thai insurance companies which covers all kind of medical treatment ( both in-house patient and out-patient) and includes COVID-19 related treatment, with the minimum coverage of 3,000,000 THB, during the entire period of stay in Thailand. More information for the health insurance can be found on https://longstay.tgia.org/

 

  • The applicant who prefer to use health insurance policy issued by foreign insurance companies for the visa application must furnish a completed “Insurance Certificate”, as well as a copy of certificate of health insurance policy that which covers all kind of medical treatment ( both in-house patient and out-patient) and includes COVID-19 related treatment, with the minimum coverage of 3,000,000 THB during the entire period of stay in Thailand. The Insurance Certificate as stipulated by the Office of Insurance Commission and Health Insurance of Thailand, must be completed, signed and stamped by the insurance company. The Insurance Certificate form is available at https://longstay.tgia.org/document/foreign_insurance_certificate.pdf

 

If the applicant is refused to purchase the health insurance by the insurance company, the applicant can submit additional documents as follows:

(1) Letter of refusal to purchase health insurance from a Thai or foreign insurance company.

(2) A copy of an up-to-date bank statement with a minimum balance of THB 3,000,000 or AUD 125,000 maintained in the bank account for 2 months prior to the application.

(3) The combined of the other health insurance for the coverage of no less than THB 3,000,000.

 

End Partial Quote

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5 minutes ago, Pib said:

 

Sure enough...the Thai Embassy in Canberra AU clearing states the new requirements which probably went into effect 1 Oct 2021 for new OA Retirement visas.   And I think I read somewhere for OA Retirement "Extensions" it will go in effect 1 Sep 2022.   Fortunately, none of the other Visa categories like Non O Marriage, Non B for Business, ED for Education,  etc. show the Bt3M requirement.

https://canberra.thaiembassy.org/visa-categories/

 

Below is a partial quote from the Thailand Embassy in Canberra, Australia.   It talks the Bt3M insurance requirement.  And it also talks what is required to use a foreign insurance policy...or use a Bt3M bank deposit in lieu of insurance... or use a combo method of deposit plus insurance policy....but to use the deposit method a person would first need to provide a letter of refusal to insure from a foreign or Thai insurance company.  


The way I read below to use a foreign insurance policy it's still going to be harder than heck in most cases to meet the policy documentation requirements and associated signatures.   While a person with a regular commercial policy might be able to meet the doc/signature requirements in the case of a person with a home country government  coverage/policy like say the U.S. retired military Tricare medical coverage that for all practical purposes has no upper limits and provides worldwide coverage, the approval of such a foreign govt policy would probably be a no-go since there is no policy issued per se, there is no policy cover page/sheet defining limits, etc....instead, it's just govt medical coverage pretty much with no limits....a person just signs up for it...and about the most they get is an unfancy letter they can download saying the are enrolled or maybe get an enrollment card.  I expect most countries which have universal health care type coverage which may provide worldwide coverage would be in the same boat regarding documentation.

 

If the words below appear in the eventual police order that comes out governing OA Retirement "extensions of stay" then once again use of a foreign policy will be extremely hard to impossible to use--and you can bet the Thai insurance companies were instrumental in making it so.

 

Partial Quote for Thailand Embassy in Canberra Australia

https://canberra.thaiembassy.org/non-immigrant-visa-category-o-a-for-retirement-long-stay-valid-for-1-year/

3.5 Health Insurance

  • a certificate of health insurance policy issued by Thai insurance companies which covers all kind of medical treatment ( both in-house patient and out-patient) and includes COVID-19 related treatment, with the minimum coverage of 3,000,000 THB, during the entire period of stay in Thailand. More information for the health insurance can be found on https://longstay.tgia.org/

 

  • The applicant who prefer to use health insurance policy issued by foreign insurance companies for the visa application must furnish a completed “Insurance Certificate”, as well as a copy of certificate of health insurance policy that which covers all kind of medical treatment ( both in-house patient and out-patient) and includes COVID-19 related treatment, with the minimum coverage of 3,000,000 THB during the entire period of stay in Thailand. The Insurance Certificate as stipulated by the Office of Insurance Commission and Health Insurance of Thailand, must be completed, signed and stamped by the insurance company. The Insurance Certificate form is available at https://longstay.tgia.org/document/foreign_insurance_certificate.pdf

 

If the applicant is refused to purchase the health insurance by the insurance company, the applicant can submit additional documents as follows:

(1) Letter of refusal to purchase health insurance from a Thai or foreign insurance company.

(2) A copy of an up-to-date bank statement with a minimum balance of THB 3,000,000 or AUD 125,000 maintained in the bank account for 2 months prior to the application.

(3) The combined of the other health insurance for the coverage of no less than THB 3,000,000.

 

End Partial Quote

Thinking logically, this would normally lead one to believe then after acquiring the 3million baht coverage, one would not need to maintain the 800k anymore...but this is Thailand and I'm sure that will not be the case.

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On 10/22/2021 at 5:21 PM, Expat68 said:

Try Pacific Cross. Thai Visa Friendly Policy (covid19 protected) this is recognised by Thai Immigration

I got Pacific Cross two years ago for my O-A extension. Medicare doesn't cover me here,

I'm now 71 and want real insurance, not just a sham policy to satisfy immigration. I got more than the minimum policy needed for immigration. Also PC will extend coverage, past 75 if you buy from them before that age. Most Thai companies won't start new policies past that age. Of course premiums increase with age.

I'm meeting with my insurance rrp this week and will try to find what PC plans for new requirements.

Converting to O visa may help avoid insurance for a while but I suspect that loophole will close soon. I don't want to leave /re-enter after my OA expires  to get O and need insurance anyway.

It is what it is.

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On 10/23/2021 at 3:47 PM, tonray said:

Thinking logically, this would normally lead one to believe then after acquiring the 3million baht coverage, one would not need to maintain the 800k anymore...but this is Thailand and I'm sure that will not be the case.

Based on how I read the Thai Embassy Canberra requirements you would still require a separate Bt800k for income.  That is, gotta have 3M to cover medical bills plus another 800K to live on.  

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I have Pacific ‘Cross Visa Friendly Policy(Covers 19 related treatment).  The maximum coverage limit is 3.5 Million.  But the annual premium is not friendly.  Between the ages of 55-60 the annual premium is now 61,000 Baht.  Obviously it will be higher for someone who is over 70.  This policy already meets the new requirements for 2022.  

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17 minutes ago, Pib said:

you would still require a separate Bt800k for income

Most of which you cannot actually use for income much of the year.......a big mess. Just keep adding more on top..

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40 minutes ago, RocketDog said:

 

Converting to O visa may help avoid insurance for a while but I suspect that loophole will close soon.

When/if that occurs that's going to affect many, many people as I'm sure there are many, many, many more people with Non-O visa/extensions in all age groups than those with Non-OA which is the 50 and older group.  And if they decide to focus only on the over 50 crowd "regardless of visa category" then that is age discrimination (however age discrimination is not illegal in Thailand). 

 

Personally, I feel the current govt continues to drift farther into being "anti-farang for long term stay/resident."  But if you want to be a tourist for a few weeks/months each year then that is great....highly desired by the govt.  And I have no doubt stuffed envelopes is causing much of the insurance change.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, RocketDog said:

I got Pacific Cross two years ago for my O-A extension. Medicare doesn't cover me here,

I'm now 71 and want real insurance, not just a sham policy to satisfy immigration. I got more than the minimum policy needed for immigration. Also PC will extend coverage, past 75 if you buy from them before that age. Most Thai companies won't start new policies past that age. Of course premiums increase with age.

I'm meeting with my insurance rrp this week and will try to find what PC plans for new requirements.

Converting to O visa may help avoid insurance for a while but I suspect that loophole will close soon. I don't want to leave /re-enter after my OA expires  to get O and need insurance anyway.

It is what it is.

I do not have Pacific Cross, I can only report on my friend who took out Pacific Cross 2 years ago when he was 74 and is still with them

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33 minutes ago, Expat68 said:

I do not have Pacific Cross, I can only report on my friend who took out Pacific Cross 2 years ago when he was 74 and is still with them

Has he made any claims? I haven't so can't judge well yet.

 

Yes, as I said, if you go with them at 75 or before you can stay with them after that. I guess I'll find out how much premiums go up as I age. 🤨

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Just now, RocketDog said:

Has he made any claims? I haven't so can't judge well yet.

 

Yes, as I said, if you go with them at 75 or before you can stay with them after that. I guess I'll find out how much premiums go up as I age. 🤨

No he hasn't made any claims

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